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T6 blurry images wedding photography

Bbphoto
Contributor
I am a starting out photographer, using a t6 with kit lens 18-55. I have been getting a lot of work and everything is great. But I keep seeing some of the “far away” images are coming in blurry and I just can’t seem to figure it out. I thought that it may have been the md filter on the front of my camera but even when I took it off, they were still blurry even if I was only ten feet away. So I guess I have to start making all my shots up close? Please help me figure this out. I shoot in either creative auto or sport due to the fact that I just can’t seem to get crisp images in other settings. And I’m honestly scared to shoot in other modes because this works best for me. Please put in your input and help me solve this problem. Thanks.
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Bbphoto
Contributor
Also - I have bought a pancake lens to help with my setup but I had to return it. It worked amazing, I could still see blurryness in the far away photos but i feel like it was better clarity than the kit lenses. I am trying to figure out what lens to get that won’t cost a fortune as I am on a tight budget. Also would love to buy a better camera but I am saving up. Any input on this would be great as well.

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32 REPLIES 32

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

@Bbphoto wrote:
I am a starting out photographer, using a t6 with kit lens 18-55. I have been getting a lot of work and everything is great. But I keep seeing some of the “far away” images are coming in blurry and I just can’t seem to figure it out. I thought that it may have been the md filter on the front of my camera but even when I took it off, they were still blurry even if I was only ten feet away. So I guess I have to start making all my shots up close? Please help me figure this out. I shoot in either creative auto or sport due to the fact that I just can’t seem to get crisp images in other settings. And I’m honestly scared to shoot in other modes because this works best for me. Please put in your input and help me solve this problem. Thanks.

If you want to do any serious photography, then you must upgrade your lenses.  You also need to educate yourself on the basics of photography.  Look for videos and articles about “ exposure triangle “ and “ depth of field “.

 

https://community.usa.canon.com/t5/General-Camera-Discussion/Canon-YouTube-Video-Series/m-p/269237#M...

 

Using P mode is the best mode to learn the camera’s features.  I suggest that you find the thread with link to the “EOS 101” video series at the above link.  You will want to watch the entire series more than once or twice, because it is a lot to absorb.

 

The Rebel T6 is a very basic, entry level DSLR.  Before you ruin your reputation by doing a poor job of photographing events, I suggest that you get at least 10,000 shots under belt.  Learn how to shoot RAW, and post process your images.  

 

Invest in a couple of fast lenses that have a maximum aperture of f/2.8, or greater.  If you are on a tight budget, I recommend the two lens “Portrait and Travel Lens Kit” from Canon.

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/portrait-and-travel-two-lens-kit

 

That will get you started.  It has a wide angle zoom and a fast 50mm for portraits.  As a wedding photographer, you would want to have at least four lenses available, plus a speedlite flash.  You would want a wide angle zoom, a standard zoom, a macro lens, and maybe a medium telephoto zoom.

 

 

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

kvbarkley
VIP
VIP

We need to see the images to see if it is a focus issue or motion blur. Weddings are usually indoors and don't have much light.

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

If I could make one recommendation, it would be buy a better lens.  2 would be even better. 

 

The T6 is capable, but is a "amature enthusiast" based body at best.  The 17-55 F2.8 is one of the best EF-S lenses available.  But you will have to consider something with more reach.  Your current 18-55 is a kit lens and can do entry level wide and close up snap shots, but you aren't going to get super high clarity from a 18MP camera, Digic 4+ and kit lens, especially in dimly lit scenarios. 

 

Even with a flash, the limited focal length is going to require that you be much closer to your subjects than you or they probably want. You will get more enjoyment and not have to work as hard if you invest in better quality lenses.  "L" series is also a good choice.  With some planning, your investment can be used with the next body you purchase too. 

 

 

*****started a reply and walked away...  the guys beat me to it.

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It


@shadowsports wrote:

Greetings,

If I could make one recommendation, it would be buy a better lens.  2 would be even better. 

 

, but you aren't going to get super high clarity from a 18MP camera, Digic 4+ and kit lens, especially in dimly lit scenarios. 


I would agree with the remark about the kit lens.  You definitely want better glass.  I think 18MP is more than sufficient for capturing highly detailed images, though.

 

3DC3741F-96FA-4F81-9F81-62142CE5E451.jpeg

 

The above was shot with a T5 and Rokinon 14mm T3.1 Cinema lens on cloudy, overcast winter day.  Good light helps, but thoughtful exposure settings and good technique holding a camera can overcome poor lighting to some degree.  

 

This was shot at ISO 800, which is as high as I would recommend with a T5/T6 camera body.  In fact, ISO 800 is pushing it.  I used Lightroom to reduce the noise in this image.

For indoor shooting, you definitely want to add an external strobe.  The built-in strobe has a maximum range of 10 feet.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Wadizzle,

Right...  the difference being your Cine quality lens.

 

This is not the lens I'd chose for a wedding.  Landscape yes.  That photo is magnificent. Very dramatic.  Really like it.

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It


@shadowsports wrote:

Wadizzle,

Right...  the difference being your Cine quality lens.

 

This is not the lens I'd chose for a wedding.  Landscape yes.  That photo is magnificent. Very dramatic.  Really like it.


Thanks,  No, it was not a lens recommendation.  I have already given my lens advice.  The Travel and Portrait Two Lens Kit is a good start towards building a nice camera kit for a photo enthusiast.  You would still need at least two more lenses, plus a flash, to even consider trying to shoot a wedding. 

 

Besides, as good as the images that can be captured with a T6, I think its’ below average low light performance makes it less than the best choice for wedding photography.  Let your assistant photographer use the T6 to capture “atmosphere” shots, and the like.  I would want a better camera before I would consider going professional. 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

667C5A36-BDC7-4F87-B852-28BB2D92C50E.jpeg

I know this tread is old and I am new to this forum, but I am not new in regards to photography. I was wondering did you shoot this pictures in raw as well as jpeg? Or did you always shoot jpeg in camera no raw. I notice that the pictures you upload in this forum are 2048x1365 which are about 2 megapixels but I don't know if the website convert the pictures in 2 megapixel file or came like that from the camera. Two megapixels is very low resolution. That could be the problem. If you are shooting JPEG only in camera make sure is set to the highest setting. I always shoot both, raw and jpeg and you should too. I have a T6i not a T6 and from what i know of I don't experience the pictures that soft. Try shooting with one focus point (usually in the middle but you can move it as required.) I also have multiple cameras, I also have a 90D and a sony A7rIII. If you decide to upgrade I strongly recommend a full frame camera. Since you are doing weddings full frame shall give you better quality in low light, and better dynamic range to recover highlights and shadows. I don't shoot wedding(only one in my life time for a family member) but I shoot landscapes as a hobby. One time I did a comparison between the T6I with the sharper ef-s 17-55 F2.8 and the sony A7RIII with the tamron 28-75mm F2.8 just for fun and I thought the T6I was giving pretty good images but the image in the sony were way better(the sony was sharper) than the T6i. Even if the t6i were using the sharper ef-s 17-55 f2.8 that many people categorize the lens as an "L" without the weather sealing. My point in this is that gear does matter. If they are paying you for taking the best pictures in a once in a lifetime moment in their lives they are expecting the best quality pictures as well. If this is something you want to take seriously, if I was you I would try to upgrade as soon as possible.

Also a backup is always important(second camera, second flash, memory cards etc.)

I which you the best.

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