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Used Tv Mode by mistake, Now how do I fix the photos?

macnak
New Contributor

I did not notice when I switched from automatic to Tv mode by mistake until I got home and saw all the  pictures overexposed and very blue( mostly shot in bright sunny outdoors) . Any suggestions on how to color correct them? I did NOT shoot in raw. Still cant even figure out wht Tv mode is or why its needed. I lost my instruction book and the internet is pretty useless about this.

 

Thanks,

Mark

10 REPLIES 10

SamanthaW
Moderator
Moderator

Hi!

Welcome to the Canon Forums and thanks for your post!

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Thanks! 

ScottyP
Respected Contributor

Tv mode is shutter priority.  Everywhere but Canon Land cameras call it S mode.  In Canon speak Tv stands for the Time Variable.  It is very useful for catching fast action with an adequately fast shutter speed or for deliberately blurring things like waterfalls, etc..

 

In TV mode you select the shutter speed and the camera changes the aperture and/or ISO to compensate so you still get a correct exposure.   If your shots came out overexposed it is because the shutter speed was set too long for the camera to be able to compensate for it.  If the shots are blurry it is because either the subject was moving or your hands were shaking or both, and your shutter speed was set too slow to freeze the action/motion.

 

There is no way to fix blur with software. 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

"In Canon speak Tv stands for the Time Variable."

 

Actually, Tv stands for 'Time Value".  It is not a variable.  It is a fixed setting by the user.  For instance you fix or set the SS to 1/500 and do not want it to change.  But you do want the aperture to change to correct for exposure. Conversely, Av (Aperture Value) fixes the aperture setting and lets the SS adjust for exposure.

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

ScottyP
Respected Contributor

I assume you have the free DPP post processing software?  You can adjust exposure downwards to a limited extent. Just hope it doesn't need more adjustment than what is possible. If your highlights are totally blown out there is no data in there to work with. 

 

The blue color is from the wrong white balance. If you shot in RAW you could make unlimited WB adjustment. You will be limited in a JPG.  You just go less blue and more yellow.  

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

macnak
New Contributor

Thanks for the help, but I never download the software, didn;t want to have to learn yet another program. I'm a old dinosaur that used to develop and print my own film. I knew how to control things, Now everything has changed digitally and electronically , changing names and processes , and making them hard to find until you you are skilled in that particular program . Navigating and the learning curve is getting to timing consuming.

 

These were shot in jpegs, so I was able to salve a few by adusting tteh blue and yellow. keeping it simple.

Mark,

You will have to go some to be older than I.  But let me tell you something, you can learn how to use some simple editing software.  The Canon DPP is free.  It isn't the easiest to use but it will do a lot of basic editing.  Best of all, it allows you to use raw. Raw is 10 times, no a 100 times better than jpg!  However, it requires post conversion and editing.  Almost no camera setting effects a raw file. Exposure is about it.  But even if you miss exposure, you have way, way more latitude to adjust in raw.

A lot of the conversion and basic editing is done automatically by DPP upon import. Actually not requiring any input from you.  Sound simple enough?  It is worth the effort to learn.

 

BTW, my first 35mm camera was a C3 way back in the late '50's.  Three soup bowls. Some acetic acid (vinegar) and developer along with a desk lamp. You'er good to go!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

RobertTheFat
Honored Contributor

@ebiggs1 wrote:

Mark,

You will have to go some to be older than I.  But let me tell you something, you can learn how to use some simple editing software.  The Canon DPP is free.  It isn't the easiest to use but it will do a lot of basic editing.  Best of all, it allows you to use raw. Raw is 10 times, no a 100 times better than jpg!  However, it requires post conversion and editing.  Almost no camera setting effects a raw file. Exposure is about it.  But even if you miss exposure, you have way, way more latitude to adjust in raw.

A lot of the conversion and basic editing is done automatically by DPP upon import. Actually not requiring any input from you.  Sound simple enough?  It is worth the effort to learn.

 

BTW, my first 35mm camera was a C3 way back in the late '50's.  Three soup bowls. Some acetic acid (vinegar) and developer along with a desk lamp. You'er good to go!


Mark,

 

You may have to go some to be older than Ernie, but you'll have to go even more to be older than I am. And if Ernie and I can adapt to 21st-century photography, so can you.

 

Ernie is right about DPP. I've been using it for ten years or more and have learned to work around its eccentricities. It will do the job for you, even if you throw yourself into RAW mode.

 

And I guess Ernie and I have more in common than I realized. My first 35mm camera was also an Argus C3, which my parents gave me for my 16th birthday. (My father and grandfather were also enthusiastic amateur photographers.) It served me well until I bought my first Nikon as a senior in college.

 

But Ernie was a professional photographer and graphic designer, while the most I can claim is that photography was part of my job (the fun part) the last several years of my career as a computer programmer. So do whatever Ernie recommends - except when he and I disagree.  Smiley Wink

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Bob from Mass,

"...except when he and I disagree."

 

There are several roads to the finish line!  I still have my C3.  Both of them. Smiley Happy  I was 12 when I got my first one. The leatherette is coming loose on one but they both still work. I used my grandma's bathroom to develop the film and make contact sheets.  She hated the smell of the stop bath (acetic acid).

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

ebiggs1
Forum Elite

"...all the  pictures overexposed..."

 

Over exposed is most likely not recoverable.  Especially with a jpg.  Reason, there isn't any info there to recover.  Try to edit them with a good post editor and hope for the best.

 

"...very blue( mostly shot in bright sunny outdoors)."

 

Incorrect WB setting.  That can probably be corrected to a degree in post editing.  Using raw instead of jpg there is no WB as it is set in post editing.  Not in the camera.  Unless you have a specific need always shoot raw in preference over jpg.  The editing and recovery is tons better if something goes awry.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!