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Long exposure noise comparison

michal
Occasional Contributor

Hi!
It is known that one of reasons for noise appearing in long exposures is increasing temperature of sensor. This drives me to a question:
Is it true that long exposures will be less noisy in cold nights than warm nights? I mean, comparing more-less +20 Celsius and 0 Celsius. Cold air could serve as a natural cooler 😛
I can't prove it by myself now cuz I only have warm nights 😛

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Ray-uk
Reputable Contributor

Yes, this is the reason why many astrophotographers use specialised cameras that have cooling systems on the sensor.

These usually cool the sensor to 0 C or a couple of degrees above. The trouble with an ordinary digital camera is that there is a lot of electronics and the battery close to the sensor and the heat from these will counteract some of the effect of lower air temperatures around the camera.

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3

Ray-uk
Reputable Contributor

Yes, this is the reason why many astrophotographers use specialised cameras that have cooling systems on the sensor.

These usually cool the sensor to 0 C or a couple of degrees above. The trouble with an ordinary digital camera is that there is a lot of electronics and the battery close to the sensor and the heat from these will counteract some of the effect of lower air temperatures around the camera.

View solution in original post

michal
Occasional Contributor
Wow.


@Ray-uk wrote:

Yes, this is the reason why many astrophotographers use specialised cameras that have cooling systems on the sensor.

These usually cool the sensor to 0 C or a couple mcdvoice of degrees above. The trouble with an ordinary digital camera is that there is a lot of electronics and the battery close to the sensor and the heat from these will counteract some of the effect of lower air temperatures around the camera.


that's correct