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Delayed exposure?

Tintype_18
Super Contributor

I found the setting that holds the shutter open for photos of fountains, waterfalls, etc. Neglected to note and can't find the title in the index. Used every word I can think of- delayed, exposure, etc. Camera is the EOS Rebel T7. Thanks.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Tintype_18
Super Contributor

Read the instructions on Bulb. Page 114 has the steps and the shutter is open up to 30 seconds. Like to try this on a fountain or waterfall. Thanks to all.

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14 REPLIES 14

stevet1
Frequent Contributor

@Tintype_18 wrote:

Read the instructions on Bulb. Page 114 has the steps and the shutter is open up to 30 seconds. Like to try this on a fountain or waterfall. Thanks to all.


Tintype,

I could be wrong, but I don't think you'll need to hold your shutter open for as long as 30 seconds, Anywhere from 1-10 seconds should be long enough.  If you have a tripod, mount your camera on the tripod, set your camera up for a 2 or 10 second delay, set your shutter speed, press your shutter, and step back from it so you don't jar it.

If you do a Google search on Photography Shooting Waterfalls, you should find plenty of tips on doing that.

 

Steve Thomas

Good info. Thanks. I have a book on digital photographpy, Digital Photography for Dummies, written just for me. There were some photo of fountains, streams and waterfalls that give a distinct effect to the moving water.

Reviewing this and plan on experimenting with some of the streams and waterfalls in the mountains. I also have a cable remote that would eliminate shaking the camera on the tripod. Have done this along with the 2 second delay.

FWIW,  I have my camera set up in the kitchen, looking out the window at suet blocks for attracting birds. I use the cable remote to "hide" to avoid spooking the birds.

I use one of these. Great for really separating your location from the camera.

 

Screenshot 2021-01-30 095931.jpg

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

Good idea. Thanks. The corded remote only has a 6 ft. cord. I can "hide" from birds, shooting through the window but the cordless would be much more "efficient" to be hidden from view. Some outdoor photographers will set a camera for roaming wildife as deer, hide in some sort of blind and use the remote to take the photo. Got the $$$ in the account to buy one.