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Canon 80d worse than Canon rebel t3i

yteln
Occasional Contributor

Hi,

 

I just got a brand new Canon 80D and took some test shots on the exact same settings as my old T3i (f/stop, shutter speed, ISO but also all the other settings I could manually set.. white balance, focus mode, exposure comp, flash exposure comp, image effects, auto correct image brightness off, one shot AF, metering mode, etc.). Also swapped the lense so that it was the same on both.I set both cameras to take L + raw and am comparing jpegs. 

 

I'd expect 80d win this comparison but t3i produced much nicer, brighter images. Even when looking at just LCD screen I could immediately tell that t3i photos are brighter and better looking, but then downloaded it on PC and confirmed that as well.

How's that possible? Either I'm missing something or my new 80d doesn't function properly since it's obviously a much better camera and with the same settings should produce superior images.

 

Any ideas what I may be missing, any hidden setting which might be causing it or is there anything I can do to figure it out?

Regards

35 REPLIES 35

Smiley Surprised Not me it was 10 degrees this morning.  Leave that to the younger guys that have not quite developed common sense yet!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

"You should be out capturing a snow scene for your town's 2021 Community Calendar."

 

Maybe not calendar worthy but at 23 degrees I did venture out. Not willingly, I might add.

 

_OS11112.jpg

_OS11115.jpg

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

wq9nsc
Respected Contributor

Only three inches of snow here Ernie but it is still miserable outside.  I am staying inside to align a newly acquired vintage radio where it is nice and warm.  Once calibration and alignment is complete I may even take a better photo of it 🙂  The multitude of buttons, controls, and nested menus on this sort of gear makes a Canon DSLR body seem not so complex.

 

Rodger

AQ9I4644.JPG

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video

Very cool.

 

You know I built a couple Heathkit radios way back in the last century. I still have a couple AR 1500a's downstairs in the storage room. Would be a great thing to do today.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

wq9nsc
Respected Contributor

I think those particular Heathkit stereo receivers are in pretty high demand by vintage gear enthusiasts these days so keep them in good shape.  There have been a couple of failed attempts at reviving Heathkit over the years but times have changed.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video

Also keep in mind the above photo is the one you claimed is the best.  It is from the T3i.  Here is the one from the 80D.

IMG_0096.jpg

 

Again extremely OOF or extremely poor lens. Impossible to compare or to say which is better or best.

 

IMG_0096.jpg

 

BTW, LR reports 35mm, not 50mm, and f2 for 1/60 SS with ISO 100.  My correction added 1 full stop exposure.  Lens correction not possible since it doesn't exists in my version of LR and/or PS/ACR.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

yteln
Occasional Contributor

Sorry my bad, it's 35mm f2, was thinking in FF equivalent. 

 

Also I didn't claim any of these photos are "the best" they were just taken from the same place with 2 cameras without any proper lightning, just in an attempt to compare bodies. What I meant is that t3i performed better on some scenes and 80d on others. Conditions weren't ideal so that I can clearly see flaws which as you can see there are many. I understand there's a ton to improve these photos, but it's kinda out of scope for this exercise 😉

 

That being said, thank you very much for your help with the analysis, it was very helpful. There's definitely a lot to keep in mind, but I think overall my conclusion is IQ between these cameras didn't improve that much (although still 80d is better in many aspects). More of an eveolution that revolution. I'm thinking about just switching to mirrorless where I could see a clear improvement though. Just need to decide between sony and canon.

 

"What I meant is that t3i performed better on some scenes and 80d on others."

 

There is no way on the face of this green earth that you can say that with any conviction.  Bad is bad, which is less bad isn't a logical conclusion. Again, I am sorry for being so blunt buy these can not in any meaningful way be compared to which is better. The correct answer is neither!

 

"I'm thinking about just switching to mirrorless where I could see a clear improvement though..."

 

Won't help or fix a thing if you still compare OOF, underexposed, shots.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Tronhard
Respected Contributor

@yteln wrote:

Sorry my bad, it's 35mm f2, was thinking in FF equivalent. My responses in blue.

 

The Yongnuo 35mm f/2 is, a best, a budget lens. See a sample review HERE  

 

The thing is that a camera like the T3i will be more tolerant of a poor lens than the much more sophisticated 80D.  Not only is the 80D's sensor capacity higher (almost twice that of the T3i), but it is a step up in other aspects - to put it simply, you're moving from a consumer-level camera to a PRO-sumer level camera several generations of development later.  Building a successful system is a matter of balancing the camera body with the lenses appropriate for it's level of performance.  The Yongnuo simply is not in that league.

 

Also I didn't claim any of these photos are "the best" they were just taken from the same place with 2 cameras without any proper lightning, just in an attempt to compare bodies. What I meant is that t3i performed better on some scenes and 80d on others. Conditions weren't ideal so that I can clearly see flaws which as you can see there are many. I understand there's a ton to improve these photos, but it's kinda out of scope for this exercise 😉

 

When you send images in for review of the technical merits of equipment, you need to take every effort to take out of the equation the human element.  That means being very careful that focus and exposure settings are appropriate, and consistent between the two camera for starters.

 

Looking at the photo blow-ups that Ebiggs1 displayed it appears that your point of focus is actually about a foot closer to the camera than the side table.  In fact the light on the far right seems to be reasonably sharp.  So either you did not focus on what you thought you had, or the lens was badly mis-focusing.

(I am curious as to whether you used autofocus or manual focusing here: you should use autofocus)

 

That being said, thank you very much for your help with the analysis, it was very helpful. There's definitely a lot to keep in mind, but I think overall my conclusion is IQ between these cameras didn't improve that much (although still 80d is better in many aspects). More of an eveolution that revolution.

 

I'm thinking about just switching to mirrorless where I could see a clear improvement though. Just need to decide between sony and canon.

 

Going Mirrorless will do you no good at all if you cannot get decent shots with the technology you have, arguably it will simply make your shots look worse.   So you need to establish what is wrong with what you have and stop blaming the cameras - the likelihood of the 80D not performing is much less than the lens giving poor results or using bad technique.

 

On technique: do you shoot via the viewfinder or the LCD display?  If you do the latter, I suggest using the viewfinder for shooting with both cameras as you then have three points of support for the camera.  Holding the camera away from you (like a cell phone) is an unstable platform and liable to give you camera shake.

 

So:  I suggest you take some time to do the following:

  • Make sure the cameras are both set to their default settings initially, but reset the image quality to RAW and Hi-Res JPG
  • Find a place with plenty of consistent light and without objects that will move, but have clearly defined shapes and tones
  • Make sure both cameras are set to autofocus - for this purpose I would suggest using spot focusing so you can be sure to focus on the same point exactly.  Be very careful to avoid camera shake - you could use a tripod if necessary.
  • Endeavour to set the framing consistently between the two cameras
  • With the cameras set to Av mode, take photos at f2, f5.6, f8 for each camera
  • Do this for ISO 160, 320 and 400 - so you are looking at about 9 shots total.
  • If you have a second lens, repeat the procedure - if it is a zoom lens use the same focal length between both cameras

Review the JPGs on a computer screen that is preferably calibrated to render correct colour, gamma and tone - you should be doing that for any photos you take.

 

If you want to have us review the results I am sure we will be happy to help, but you have to provide viable material to work with and be sure to reduce the variables in the experiment so we can narrow down the issues.


 

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

"I was focusing on ... 3 bottles of water and a guittar respectively."

 

I was simply going by the info I had. Three bottles of water.

 

I have never used a Yongnuo lens nor even seen one in person.  I don't think they are even AF on a 80D but perhaps they are. The things I have heard about them has kept me from ever trying one.  Most say they are very poorly made with all plastic parts even some lens elements are plastic.    Don't know, don't want to. I think this case is over.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!