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How much longer will EF be around?

chahath
New Contributor

I know photography is more than just gear, and a lens that was great 5 years ago didn't get worse just because newer better ones are out, but I fear that if I don't sell my EF lenses soon they'll become worthless when everyone and their dog have moved on to the RF mount. I don't shoot professionally and I'm not made of money, so I'd rather not have to write off all the money I spent on EF lenses if I can avoid some of the loss by selling them while they're still worth something.

87 REPLIES 87

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

Dude, get real. I was clealry referring to mirrorless offerings. Canon is not even close to being able to compete with what Sony offers. They are years behind and they will remain so at the rate they are releasing flop after flop. That isn't even debatable. As for "pro" offerings, none of these companies would likely survive for long if they had to depend mostly on pros. It is the hobbyist and enthusiast that bring in the money. 

 

 

Dude?

 As for "pro" offerings, none of these companies would likely survive for long if they had to depend mostly on pros.

 

On the contrary my dude friend, the low end market has almost totally evaporated. Basically enthusiasts and pro are all that is left.  Sony makes no pro gear remember!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

@ebiggs1 wrote:

Dude? 


Well, I didn't want to call you Pops. 

I do respond to "Pop".  Smiley Happy

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!



"I suppose Sony has nothing fear from Canon"

 

That is simply backwards, Canon has nothing to fear from Sony.  


The comment was a surrender.  I was not trying to get into a flame war.  

 

Sony camera bodies have their share of flaws, and lack of good weather sealing is a major one.  Camera bodies do not have to be “professional grade” to have some degree of protection against dust and moisture.  One should not have to buy the flagship product to get useful weather sealing, either.  

 

I am not saying [that] only the top of the line products have weather sealing.  But, it just seems like the more consumer oriented camera bodies do not [have] any [even though Sony specs say that they do].  

 

Protection against dust is just as important as protection against moisture.  Case in point.  The EOS R covers its’ image sensor when there is no lens attached.  I do not know if the EOS RP has this feature, but it should if it doesn’t.

 

There is a crowd that raves about Sony AF.  I have already cited its’ flaws, which they have tried to correct in the A7r4.  Sony seems to have finally figured out how to smoothly track and focus on a subject in video modes.  Canon has had this feature for years  with the second generation of Dual Pixel AF.

 

Personally, I do not think the average consumer needs a 61 MP camera.

 

CD57BA11-758F-4187-A172-D3241162BF5A.jpeg

 

The above image was shot with 14 MP 1D4 using an EF 35mm f/2 IS USM lens.  Looks plenty sharp and high resolution for me.  

 

When you post to social media, the images often times are downsized.  Sometimes you [encounter] file size limits like this forum.  In my experience, the “low resolution” images, 16 MP or less, look better under these circumstances.

 

DDE228B9-0EB6-4DD7-A36A-7B26007FD2CA.jpeg

 

Here is color version of a cropped mage that I recently posted as a full size 26 MP black and white image.  

 

2019_05_271004039-3.jpg

 

The color version is not as sharp because it had to [be] downsized for posting on social media.  The 14 MP color image is far sharper than the 26 MP cropped color image.  

 

In other words, most consumers do not need 61 MP.  There are a limited number of shooting scenarios where the 61 MP will make a difference to a professional photographer.  The average consumer does not need 61 MP, and would have a hard time telling the difference between a 61 MP image and a 16 MP image.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

"One should not have to buy the flagship product to get useful weather sealing,..."

 

Cost vs performance. It costs money to add features like weather sealing.  Gaskets that cover every possible opening doesn't come free.  A Rebel that had the weather sealing of a 1 series or even a 5 series would cost considerably more. How much is the Rebel buying consumer willing to pay?  I don't know, maybe they would. Canon obviously doesn't think so.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"One should not have to buy the flagship product to get useful weather sealing,..."

 

Cost vs performance. It costs money to add features like weather sealing.  Gaskets that cover every possible opening doesn't come free.  A Rebel that had the weather sealing of a 1 series or even a 5 series would cost considerably more. How much is the Rebel buying consumer willing to pay?  I don't know, maybe they would. Canon obviously doesn't think so.


“Sony camera bodies have their share of flaws, and lack of good weather sealing is a major one.  Camera bodies do not have to be “professional grade” to have some degree of protection against dust and moisture.  One should not have to buy the flagship product to get useful weather sealing, either.  

 

I am not saying [that] only the top of the line products have weather sealing.  But, it just seems like the more consumer oriented camera bodies do not [have] any [even though Sony specs say that they do].”

 

Context is an amazing thing.

 

As for how much longer will the EF mount be around goes, it is here to stay.  The EF mount is used in more places besides consumer DSLRs.  Canon is a leading manufacturer of lenses for security cameras, many of which use EF mount lenses.

 

 

 

6576BC20-A628-4650-AC94-56DC2ACE2C05.jpeg  1923B6BC-4AD7-485C-9D3F-1A66EF4511BE.jpeg

 

Axis and Avigilon are two of the leading manufacturers of security cameras in the world.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

@ebiggs1 wrote:

The one big problem and perhaps my biggest issue with Nikon whether it is the D5 or D850 is it doesn't feel like a Canon 1 series in your hands. 

 

All cameras have their strong points and weakness.  


I have no problem with how a Nikon feels. The bigger problem for me is the shallow buffer. The D750 holds a measly 13 RAW frames before it buffers out, shooting at full speed. That may be fine at the museum or at the bird bath, and it may be fine when I come upon a desert tortoise, but is no good for me otherwise. And it takes about 8 seconds to drain while writing to a UHS-2 card. Even the 6D2 has a deeper buffer. So that is a much bigger problem for me than the fact that it doesn't "feel" like a Canon 1. 

 

As you noted, they all have their strengths and weaknesses, but a shallow buffer is a real problem for wildlife and outdoors. 

"...but a shallow buffer is a real problem for wildlife and outdoors."

 

I agree it isn't good but all cameras have limits. You know that going in. You as the photographer have to work around those. I'm just not a "blame my tools" person.  But you do need to pick the best tool for the job.

 

I don't want to be rude or dis yours or anybodies gear but Nikon's "in general" feel cheap compared to Canon. Now I am mostly talking about the full on pro line of cameras and lenses. However, I think the Rebel is a way more robust camera vs the Nikon equivalent.  Just my very humble opinion and 5+ decades of trial and error.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

"That is why I bought two Nikon Df bodies - the Df ..."

 

It is a little beyound a shutter button and a meter! Smiley Wink

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!