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How much longer will EF be around?

chahath
New Contributor

I know photography is more than just gear, and a lens that was great 5 years ago didn't get worse just because newer better ones are out, but I fear that if I don't sell my EF lenses soon they'll become worthless when everyone and their dog have moved on to the RF mount. I don't shoot professionally and I'm not made of money, so I'd rather not have to write off all the money I spent on EF lenses if I can avoid some of the loss by selling them while they're still worth something.

87 REPLIES 87

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

Well, the 6D2 is a no-go for me, due to the problems with DR at BASE ISO. I am frequently in the desert, and often shoot at base. The issue has been documented to my satisfaction, and it is a problem. Now, I'm not one of these people who say that the 6D2 has bad DR period. It does not, but I believe that at 100, trying to recover detail in the shadows is a problem that I don't need. I think a lot of people shoot jpegs and they won't notice it in that format. But they will in raw. 

 

As for your friend's experience with the D500, and his issue with his hit rate and and getting soft images, give me a break. That camera can shoot at 10 FPS, has 153 AF points, of which 99 are cross type. That camera is highly regarded by more than a few wildlife and outdoor pros. No offense, but I think it's your friend who has the problem. Or maybe pros like Ronan Donovan are just "lucky" with the D500. 

 

 


@John_SD wrote:

Well, the 6D2 is a no-go for me, due to the problems with DR at BASE ISO. I am frequently in the desert, and often shoot at base. The issue has been documented to my satisfaction, and it is a problem. Now, I'm not one of these people who say that the 6D2 has bad DR period. It does not, but I believe that at 100, trying to recover detail in the shadows is a problem that I don't need. I think a lot of people shoot jpegs and they won't notice it in that format. But they will in raw. 

 

As for your friend's experience with the D500, and his issue with his hit rate and and getting soft images, give me a break. That camera can shoot at 10 FPS, has 153 AF points, of which 99 are cross type. That camera is highly regarded by more than a few wildlife and outdoor pros. No offense, but I think it's your friend who has the problem. Or maybe pros like Ronan Donovan are just "lucky" with the D500. 

 

 


Any decrease in the dynamic range of the 6D2 at ISO 100 are highly exaggerated.  The dynamic range at higher ISOs more than makes up for losing 1/3 of stop, or whatever it is, at ISO 100.  If you believe that you recovering detail out of the shadows at ISO 100 is a non-starter, then so be it.  

 

I think it is a non-problem.  Shoot at ISO 200, where DR exceeds the 6D.  This shot with a 6D2 and a EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM.

 

71676240-E121-40E3-BA6A-5EC1A483C611.jpeg

 

Like I said, my friend was getting soft images mainly because his shutter was too slow for sports.  I am not trying to argue, but Nikon’s claim that the D500 has 153 AF points is very misleading because only 55 are selectable.

 

The D500 is a highly regarded camera for wildlife photography.  Yes, my friend did have problems using the camera.  Don’t forget, he was using a 70-200 with a teleconverter.  After having used it myself, I had to remove the teleconverter.  Yes, I could easily track subjects after a little practice.  But these were relatively big subjects, kids on a football field.

 

Being very near the ocean, there are frequently sea gulls flying around.  I could track them, but the shots were not tack sharp.  I could get pretty sharp photos when I first acquired a gull, but images were softer as it tracked.  I was tracking gulls against the sky.  

 

Like I said, the AF tracking in the Canon is much better, but I suspect the real problem was the lens.  The Nikon 70–200mm f/2.8 does not come close to the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM.  I am sure that Nikon’s far expensive super telephoto primes are sharper than the 70-200 f/2.8 zoom, which would easily explain why the D500 has such a good reputation among pro wildlife photographers.

If you want the Nikon, then go for one.  Do not let me sway your opinion.  There is more to photography than the camera body, though.  It is a combination of body, lens, and photographer.  Canon has the better lenses, that much is certain.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

"The lens was Nikkor 70-200mm, but it was not the newest one."

 

That is a dreadful lens!  Not one of Nikkor's best efforts and it costs way to much.  The new replacement is much better and costs way, way too much.

The D750 and now the D850 are tempting cameras.  Very tempting if you do not already have a lot of Canon lenses and gear. I could love the D850 but not now. Where I am at.

 

The one big problem and perhaps my biggest issue with Nikon whether it is the D5 or D850 is it doesn't feel like a Canon 1 series in your hands. The D3500, Rebel equivalent, is horrible feeling ot me. I know that is a personal thing and others like them. I don't.

 

All cameras have their strong points and weakness.  These should not become the photographers, if they do you aren't much of a photographer and probably need to find another hobby or profession. My 2 cents and worth every penny.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

I can't be too far off with my assessment of how they feel.  When I did the DSLR 101 classes, I bet there was a 5 to 1 advantage to Rebel owners to Nikon owners. I asked some why they bought what they did and most of the time the Nikon owners said reputation of Nikon. Not features or price or 'feel'.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"The lens was Nikkor 70-200mm, but it was not the newest one."

 

That is a dreadful lens!  Not one of Nikkor's best efforts and it costs way to much.  The new replacement is much better and costs way, way too much.

 

The one big problem and perhaps my biggest issue with Nikon whether it is the D5 or D850 is it doesn't feel like a Canon 1 series in your hands.

.


My friend really liked the way the Canon body felt in his hand, too.  I was using battery grips, so I suspect that had a major something to do with it.  He said my Canon rigs felt better balanced in his hands.  

 

He fell in love with he idea of 70-200 on full frame, 6D2, and a 100-400 on a crop body, 7D2, and how the two setups had a near identical weight, look, and feel to them.  Of course, he loved the images.

 

He knows that the older Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 has issues, and is not quite as good as the Canon version.  He was just blown away by how dramatically sharper the Canon 70-200mm II was compared to is older Nikkor.  And, it was several hundred dollars cheaper than the newest Nikkor, which is still not as good as the Canon. 

 

I think he was overwhelmed by the AF tracking controls in the Nikon.  Who knows how he had them set in his D500.  He did not like the menu system in the Nikon, but loved the Canon menus.

 

He found the Canon AF tracking to be more intuitive.  He fell love with the AF Case settings in the 7D2.  He never fully understood his Nikon AF tracking menus until he used a Canon.  The Nikon AF Guide book for the D500 is terrible.  The Canon 7D2 AF Guide is much more clearly written.

 

Because he likes to use extenders a lot, I encouraged him to get the 80D over the 7D2.  He also likes to shoot lots of videos of the kids, too, which is why I turned him away from a 7D2.  He dabbles in shooting music videos, too.  He cannot wait to see a 7D3.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

@Waddizzle wrote:

Because he likes to use extenders a lot, I encouraged him to get the 80D over the 7D2.  He also likes to shoot lots of videos of the kids, too, which is why I turned him away from a 7D2.  He dabbles in shooting music videos, too.  He cannot wait to see a 7D3.


Threre have been ongoing rumors that Canon will release the 90D, which will replace both the 80D and 7D2, effectively bringing both cameras to the end of the line. Here are the rumored specs. See Canon Rumors. Supposedly this is coming from a longtime reliable insider voice, who also nailed the 6D2 specs a couple of months before it was released. So we shall see. 

 

Canon EOS 90D Specifications: (Rumored)

  • 32.5mp APS-C DPAF Sensor
  • Dual DIGIC 8
  • Dual SD card slots
  • 10fps still shooting
  • ISO range of 100-51,200
  • 45 AF points (no word on the number of cross-type points)
  • 4K video at 24/25, 30 and 60fps (No word on DPAF in 4K recording)
  • 3.2″ rear articulating LCD
  • Dust and moisture sealing
  • Built-in wifi and Bluetooth
  • $1399 USD price at launch
  • Coming late August 2019


@John_SD wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

Because he likes to use extenders a lot, I encouraged him to get the 80D over the 7D2.  He also likes to shoot lots of videos of the kids, too, which is why I turned him away from a 7D2.  He dabbles in shooting music videos, too.  He cannot wait to see a 7D3.


Threre have been ongoing rumors that Canon will release the 90D, which will replace both the 80D and 7D2, effectively bringing both cameras to the end of the line. Here are the rumored specs. See Canon Rumors. Supposedly this is coming from a longtime reliable insider voice, who also nailed the 6D2 specs a couple of months before it was released. So we shall see. 

 

Canon EOS 90D Specifications: (Rumored)

  • 32.5mp APS-C DPAF Sensor
  • Dual DIGIC 8
  • Dual SD card slots
  • 10fps still shooting
  • ISO range of 100-51,200
  • 45 AF points (no word on the number of cross-type points)
  • 4K video at 24/25, 30 and 60fps (No word on DPAF in 4K recording)
  • 3.2″ rear articulating LCD
  • Dust and moisture sealing
  • Built-in wifi and Bluetooth
  • $1399 USD price at launch
  • Coming late August 2019

Rumors can be fun.  Some of the specs make [me] wonder what were they thinking. 

 

I would hope that the [dual] SD card slots would be UHS-II, not UHS-I.  A 32 MP, 10 fps, successor to the 7D2 would need to write a LOT of data very quickly.  I like the two slots of the same type, though.  At least I hope both SD slots are UHS-II, and not one UHS-I slot and one UHS-II slot..

 

Seeing how the 80D already has 45 cross-type AF points, I would be surprised if they dialed back on that specification.  In fact, seeing how the 7D2 has 65 all cross-type AF points, I would expect the number of AF points to be closer to 65 than 45.

 

I think omitting the GPS found in the 7D2 would be a major mistake.  The GPS has been an appealing feature in the 7D2.  Not including it would put Canon at a distinct disadvantage compared to the competition.  The 6D2 has Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and GPS, which I understand is housed in the top of the camera where a flash would be on a Canon crop sensor body.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

@Waddizzle wrote:

@John_SD wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

Because he likes to use extenders a lot, I encouraged him to get the 80D over the 7D2.  He also likes to shoot lots of videos of the kids, too, which is why I turned him away from a 7D2.  He dabbles in shooting music videos, too.  He cannot wait to see a 7D3.


Threre have been ongoing rumors that Canon will release the 90D, which will replace both the 80D and 7D2, effectively bringing both cameras to the end of the line. Here are the rumored specs. See Canon Rumors. Supposedly this is coming from a longtime reliable insider voice, who also nailed the 6D2 specs a couple of months before it was released. So we shall see. 

 

Canon EOS 90D Specifications: (Rumored)

  • 32.5mp APS-C DPAF Sensor
  • Dual DIGIC 8
  • Dual SD card slots
  • 10fps still shooting
  • ISO range of 100-51,200
  • 45 AF points (no word on the number of cross-type points)
  • 4K video at 24/25, 30 and 60fps (No word on DPAF in 4K recording)
  • 3.2″ rear articulating LCD
  • Dust and moisture sealing
  • Built-in wifi and Bluetooth
  • $1399 USD price at launch
  • Coming late August 2019

Rumors can be fun.  Some of the specs make wonder what were they thinking. 

 

I would hope that the dust SD card slots would be UHS-II, not UHS-I.  A 32 MP, 10 fps, successor to the 7D2 would need to write a LOT of data very quickly.  I like the two slots of the same type, though.  At least I hope both SD slots are UHS-II, and not one UHS-I slot and one UHS-II slot..

 

Seeing how the 80D already has 45 cross-type AF points, I would be surprised if they dialed back on that specification.  In fact, seeing how the 7D2 has 65 all cross-type AF points, I would expect the number of AF points to be closer to 65 than 45.

 

I think omitting the GPS found in the 7D2 would be a major mistake.  The GPS has been an appealing feature in the 7D2.  Not including it would put Canon at a distinct disadvantage compared to the competition.  The 6D2 has Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and GPS, which I understand is housed in the top of the camera where a flash would be on a Canon crop sensor body.


Well, when I look at recent Canon releases, I am struck by the fact that Sony has nothing to fear, as the company is really without rival at this point in time. Its planned September release of the mirrorless 61 MP A7R4 monster is a case in point. By contrast, anemic,safe and slow seem to be Canon's guiding philosophy these days, sad to say. The company's recent releases have been disappointing to say the least. I expect the trend to continue. 


@John_SD wrote:

Well, when I look at recent Canon releases, I am struck by the fact that Sony has nothing to fear, as the company is really without rival at this point in time. Its planned September release of the mirrorless 61 MP A7R4 monster is a case in point. By contrast, anemic,safe and slow seem to be Canon's guiding philosophy these days, sad to say. The company's recent releases have been disappointing to say the least. I expect the trend to continue. 


I suppose Sony has nothing fear from Canon. Canon gear works as advertised, without any hidden surprises like short battery life.  But I will give Sony credit, though, because they have tried hard to significantly improve battery life.

 

Like I said, the Sony cameras are not the land of milk and honey that they might seem to be a first glance.  The camera do have some significant issues.  People are realizing that banding in Sony bodies is real.  It seems that it only occurs when you use the silent shutter mode with faster shutter speeds.

 

The A7r4 monster has its’ own set of flaws and issues.  The pixel shift to create a 240 MP image is a neat trick.  But no one has seen the software to process the 1 GB files.  The individual 61 MP files are about 120 MB in size.  The effects of the rolling shutter across the entire sensor creates very distorted images.  The 4K is usable provided the camera is fixed, and nothing in the frame moves very fast or very far. 

 

There are more issues with the A7r4: i.e.; the only way to get AF eyeball tracking in video modes is to use native Sony lenses. Tony Northrup explains those problems and a host of other issues in his latest video.  He does not like the camera, which says a lot because he has become a mirrorless camera fanboy over the past year  Jared Polin is not a fan, either!

 

Like I said, there is far more to photography than the camer body.  The body is the least important piece of lithe puzzle.  In the order of most important to least importance, it is photographer, lens, and then camera body.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

"I suppose Sony has nothing fear from Canon"

 

That is simply backwards, Canon has nothing to fear from Sony.  No matter what specs Sony may try and cram into a camera they do not produce professional gear.  Now let's consider the Sony lens line up to Canon's! Are you kidding, Canon has nothing to fear from Sony.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!