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Birding Lens Recommendations for EOS Rebel T7

Kflo
Apprentice

I’m just getting into the photography world. My husband is a goose hunter and wants me to take photos of the hunts. I have the EF-S 18-55mm and EF 75-300mm lenses. Neither are going to be good for capturing birds flying in. Need recommendations for a lenses that would be good for capturing goose and ducks flying from the sky into the water. Budget around $1,000 USD. 

8 REPLIES 8

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

The best bang for your buck (price point) will be an EF 150-600 mm by Sigma (Contemporary) or Tamron (G2) 

Either of these lenses will provide the most flexibility for Wildlife and BIF.  Note that capturing BIF takes practice.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


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Tronhard
Elite
Elite

I can only vehemently agree with my respected colleague Rick. If you look in the section in the menu for Gallery and choose Share you photos, you can search for examples of images using those lenses.

He is also right that wildlife, particularly bird photography, has a learning curve and requires practise - lots of it.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

March411
Enthusiast

Right now the Sigma site has the 60-600mm and the 150-600mm in stock. Both are slightly over your target price but may be worth looking at and splurge a little. I own the 60-600mm and love the lens.

KEH is a reputable use lens reseller and has them in stock also, I've purchase excellent to like new and they have been excellent lenses. They will be closer to your price point.

The 60-600mm is a bit on the heavy side but helps produce beautiful images and has a deep range. If you decide to go with Sigma at some point you may want to purchase the dock, it allows you to calibrate your lens and get it tack sharp images.



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many EF lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for image processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/

In terms of pure focal length range and image quality, I'm with you - the Sigma 60-600 is a stunning optic and as close to a single lens solution as one can get with a 600mm max focal length.  I have been hesitant to suggest it only on the basis of weight - it's a hefty beast.  Much depends on what the OP is comfortable in carrying.
Given that they are using an APS-C camera, something at the short end - perhaps an EF-S 15-85 IS USM, a EF 17-40 f/4, or the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 might be worth considering in addition, for the great landscapes of the area.

Totally envious, I always wanted to spend a year in Yellowstone...


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Agreed, at almost 6 lbs the 60-600mm it can get heavy, the 150-600mm comes in at just about 4.5 pounds which could be significant if you are holding it all day.

I had my 60-600 in the field on Monday and hand hold when I shoot but have a monopod holding the weight in between shots. Each lens will cause fatigue if you try carrying them all day.

Either are a good choice and produce great images.

Canon 5d MIV - 1/1250 - F6.3 @ ISO 640

Cardinal.jpg



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many EF lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for image processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/

Tintype_18
Authority
Authority

Both should be good. I have the Sigma 150-600mm for nature photos.

John
Canon EOS T7; EF-S 18-55mm IS; EF 28-135mm IS; EF 75-300mm; Sigma 150-600mm DG

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"I have the EF-S 18-55mm and EF 75-300mm lenses."

Who said neither is good for birding? Did you try?  The ef 75-300mm is not a great lens but 300mm may be sufficient FL at least for some shots. I'd give it a go before you buy another lens.

When talking super tele zooms somebody or several folks will always complain about how big and heavy they are. Its just the name of the game. Tele lenses are big and they are heavy it's just a matter of the current law of physics. Either you can handle it or you can't but it is the price you pay for a super telel zoom.

There is a super light big tele that most don't consider and perfect for those that can't seem to handle a super zoom. The ef 400mm f5.6L which is no longer made but readily available on the used market.

WBIMG_231120.jpg

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"I have been hesitant to suggest it only on the basis of weight - it's a hefty beast."

The Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens is not designed for the general market. It is a purpose made professional quality lens for that market. That is why Sigma has the much lesser quality plastic C model line.

For most people the C model is perfect. If I was still active in my career I would buy the Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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