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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 91
Registered: ‎08-24-2013
Accepted Solution

Raw processing

I just have a few questions on processing canon raws.

 

1. I just learned that Adobe lightroom throws away all picture styles so that what I see on my LCD screeen is not what I get in lightroom. I saw the picture style correctiong thing, and I have set it to standard.  I wanted to know what else may be affecting my pictures.

 

2. Is there way to convert raw files to DNG while savingthe jpeg style information?

 

3. Metering. I keep reading about matrix metering. Is that the same as evaluative metering?

 

VIP
Posts: 11,353
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Raw processing

The whole idea of RAW is the fact it captures exactly what the camera sees.  It does not process the image at all.

When you shoot RAW, the expectation is you 'want' to do the settings and manuplication.  It is simple to restore them in LR or PS, howerver.

 

JPG is distructive and loses a lot of the data.  That data is unrecoverable.  You simply threw it away.

 

If you want jpg's shoot jpg's but if you want the best possible results shoot RAW and decide yourself what the photo should look like.  It is more work but you need to decide if you want it.

 

Matrix metering is the same thing as evaulating metering.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 91
Registered: ‎08-24-2013

Re: Raw processing

I am interested in having what i shoot on my lcd screen match what I get in lightroom. HOw do I do that besides shoot in just jpegs

Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,827
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Raw processing

Lightroom has profiles that try to emulate Picture Styles. They are all the way down the bottom of the right panel in the develop module.
John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LRCC Classic
VIP
Posts: 11,353
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Raw processing

"HOw do I do that besides shoot in just jpegs"

 

If you want the shot to look like a jpg, why are you shooting RAW in the first place?  The whole concept of RAW is to make sure your shot does NOT look like a jpg!

RAW can be dumbed down to look like a jpg because you can do way more adjusting in it than you can in jpg.  But I can't understand why.

Just shoot jpg's from the get go. Jpg's are not bad and RAW is not for everybody.  You should always shoot your reuirements. Not something somebody somewhere else may have told you is better.

Shoot what works with the least amount of trouble.

 

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,815
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Raw processing

When you shoot in RAW the camera records choices such as picture styles, white balance, etc. but it does NOT apply them to the image itself.  It's not allowed to make any change to the image that would result in a loss of original data (that's the whole point of RAW ... it preservers all the information and allows the highest possible post-shooting adjustment latitude.)

 

HOWEVER... when you shoot in RAW, a "preveiw" image is also generated and the preview image is technically a JPEG.  I suspect you're seeing the preview.  There is nothing wrong with Lightroom ... it's doing exactly what it is supposed to do and displaying the RAW image exactly as your camera recorded it (which is without any artistic adjustments).

 

You'll need to apply the corrections using Lightroom to mimic the look you want or use the Lightroom presets.

 

As for metering... yes Nikon "Matrix Metering" is basicaly their version of Canon "Evaluative Metering".  The two systems are not identical, but both meter most of the image (they leave out the extreme borders) and automatically try to find the light and dark areas to optimize exposure.  It's not foolproof, of course, but it does do satisfactory work in most circumstances.  

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 91
Registered: ‎08-24-2013

Re: Raw processing

Forgive me I was under the impression that what I shot in the LCD screen was representation of what I was seeing through the view finder and my file whether it was jpeg or raw. Now that  I know this not the case. It make me rather sad, but what can you do?

 

I

 

 

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎09-01-2014

Re: Raw processing

[ Edited ]

@Kolourl3lind wrote:

Forgive me I was under the impression that what I shot in the LCD screen was representation of what I was seeing through the view finder and my file whether it was jpeg or raw. Now that  I know this not the case. It make me rather sad, but what can you do?

 

I

 

 


@Kolourl3lind,

I've tried several different RAW editors and found them not to be what I expected, for the same reasons you stated. I use Didital Photo Professional, yes, the free version that comes with your camera. It doesn't change your RAW file, but it DOES bring in the settings you had in the camera for that particular shot, i.e., white balance, contrast, color saturation, etc., for the initial view when you first load the RAW files. I know a lot of photographers that depend on their RAW editors to "create" a final product. Personally, and this is just a preference, I like to leave a shoot with a useable product, as much as can be expected. Images don't always need improving or tweeking and I don't particularly like setting up a profile for all my cameras, although I did with a couple of RAW editors. I still found DPP to fill my needs.

If you like the way your images look on your LCD, you will love the way they look on your computer using Digital Photo Professional. Just make sure that DPP has the latest update, which is 3.14.15.0 for 32bit opperating system and 4.?? for 64 bit. The 64bit version only supports full frame cameras, at least that's the way it was the last time I checked.

The only problem I see for you using DPP, is that you want a PNG file (which for you that don'y know, uses lossless compression) and DPP will only export JPeG and TIFF. However, there are plenty of free or low cost image editors that will do the conversion from TIFF to PNG. For most uses, exporting from DPP, even commercial, a JPeG set to its "best" quality, will do the job. Excepting Hi Resolution printing, then I go with the RAW or TIFF to my printer.

 

I hope this helps,

 

-FD

Highlighted
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,827
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Raw processing

I agree that DPP does a good job and may be all some folks need for minor tweaking, cropping, etc. I am assuming that if Kolourl3lind opens a JPEG in LR that he/she is happy with that look (i.e.it looks like the camera LCD) and when printed the print looks like the monitor. In other words there is no problem with monitor calibration or printer profiles.

 

However, if Kolourl3lind is comfortable using LR and wants to stick with it then go to the bottom right of the Develop Module:

 

Capture.JPG

 

 

By clicking on the Profile that says "Adobe Standard" a popup window opens and there are profiles called "Camera Standard", "Camera Landscape" and others with "Camera" prefix.

 

These are Adobe's attempt at emulating the in camera Picture Syles. They aren't perfectly exact but they are very close.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LRCC Classic
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 91
Registered: ‎08-24-2013

Re: Raw processing

I was just looking into DPP this morning. I didn't know I had it. All hear about LR and PS. I really just skipped over this program. To me, it doesn't matter what the format of the file is along as it's close to what I percieve I am taking a pictures of when I shoot through my view finder. I would like to know I have a good base to start working off when I make edits.

 

I am more in the camp of learning the photography and get it right at the time of the shoot. I have often walk home satisfied with my photos after viewing them on the LCD screen only to upload them in LR and scratch my head thinking this doesn't look like the picture I took.. I thought my screen must not be calibrated correctly.

 

Now that I know what's going on, it just make things easier. Just a large pot hole on the road of photography.

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