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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-07-2018

No white balance information available

Hi.

 

I have DPP 4.8.20.0

 

Screenshot shows what I wrote in subject.

 

canon.png

Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,414
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: No white balance information available

Technically, both displays are correct because your image appears to have been a photo saved as JPEG in the camera.  

The right hand info display is showing you the camera settings used to create the image.  The left side is trying to indicate that a JPEG has no actual WB setting.  The only WB setting that applies to a JPEG is “As Shot”, which in your case is “Cloudy”.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-07-2018

Re: No white balance information available

What are the other settings except "As Shot"?

 

Is the left side read correctly WB of the RAW file?

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,414
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: No white balance information available

[ Edited ]

@Echelonwrote:

What are the other settings except "As Shot"?

 

Is the left side read correctly WB of the RAW file?


I am not sure if I fully understand your questions.

 

A JPEG does not really have WB data.  The WB setting is baked into the image when it was adjusted, which is why I describe it “As Shot.”  

 

Your second question is where the disconnect begins.  The left side is not reading a RAW file EXIF data.  It is displaying the JPEG EXIF data.  

 

Look at it this way.  A RAW file is the digital equivalent of a film negative.  It contains metadata that describes how it was created  Canon’s DPP software is effectively a digital darkroom.  A JPEG is the digital equivalent of a hard copy print of a photograph.

 

DPP can read the RAW file, and produce an image that would be equivalent to what a virtual JPEG would look like.  You can use DPP to make changes to various settings, which alter the appearance of the virtual JPEG.  When you are satisfied with your adjustments, you use DPP to produce an actual JPEG file of the virtual JEPG that it has been displaying.

 

A JEPG contains metadata that describes how it should be displayed, whether it is on a digital display, or printed on paper.  There is little difference between displaying on screen or on paper.  The computer code to produce one or the other is identical.  The only difference is that the programmer sends the instruction code to a display device, or a print device.  But, that is going off on a tangent.

Your issue is that you are beginning with a JPEG, not a RAW file.  You are not able to make the extensive adjustments that you can with a RAW file.  Many JPEG files contain metadata that echoes what would have been in the RAW file that was used to create the JPEG, which is what you see on the right.

 

However, JPEG files contains metadata that describes how it should be displayed, be it on a computer monitor or on paper.  In this sense, I am talking about all JPEG files, not just the ones created by photo software.  Windows MS Paint can create a JPEG file, which will only contain metadata that describes how it should be displayed.

 

 

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
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