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New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-06-2018

Best Powershot to Buy

Hey everyone, I am new to this forum so I may post this in multiple discussion threads as I am not sure which would be the most appropriate. 

I have owned DSLR camers for years but never a point and shoot. 

 

I am currently debating between the SX 740, G7 X MK II and G9 X MK II.

 

I've done research on reviews, comparisons, etc but it's super close to call and the price difference is pretty significant with the G7 X. I have a feeling the SX 740 would be sufficient for me but wanted to get more opinions. 

 

Zoom isn't a big deal since I still own my DSLR, and high video quality/focus and mounting support are important (though I am aware that these three can be mounted where the SX 730 can not).

I am planning to use this for vlogging (video blogging) for vacations, travel, food, excursions, etc.

 

Thank You all! 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,035
Registered: ‎03-01-2014

Re: Best Powershot to Buy

Why not consider a dedicated camcorder then?

New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-06-2018

Re: Best Powershot to Buy

either far too expensive and bulky or too cheap and low quality for what I need. I've already tested out camcorders

Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,168
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Best Powershot to Buy

[ Edited ]

@aj2475 wrote:

either far too expensive and bulky or too cheap and low quality for what I need. I've already tested out camcorders


Dollar for dollar, you will probably get better video performance from a camcorder than you would get from a point and shoot camera.  The digital image sensor in about any “stills” camera will tend to overheat with extended use.  Photo cameras can capture video, but they are designed to do so for a short video clip lasting a few seconds to a few minutes, not sustained clips lasting dozens of minutes.

 

The image sensors designed for capturing video are different from those designed for capturing stills.  An image designed for video can capture 1080P HD at 50/60 frames per second.  An image sensor designed for photography can capture a very high resolution image very quickly, typically 10-100 times faster than a video sensor.

A video sensor draws less power over time.  A photo sensor sensor draws more power for a shorter tIme period to complete its’ task.  When a photo sensor is used for video, it will draw considerably more power capturing a sustained sequence of images than a video sensor.  This is why image sensors in still cameras tend to overheat when shooting video.  I am certain your research revealed this trend.

 

Whatever you decide to purchase, just remember that you will get what you pay for.  My advice is be aware of what you are buying, and how well that product aligns with your intended use.  Just like cars, or anything else, not all cameras are created equal.  Let us know how you make out.

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