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New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-18-2020

Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

Hey All,

 

Hoping to get some help here. The other day I dropped my camera a couple of feet and it landed on the end of my 18-55mm lense. It seems to have jammed the lense back, and now it gets stuck between 24 and 35mm and needs to be forced through.

 

Any tips on how to fix this? I tried to dissassemble the lense but my screwdrivers started to strip the screws so I wanted to check on here first before I went any further with that.

 

Thanks!

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,024
Registered: ‎11-19-2017

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

[ Edited ]

Greetings,

I'd send it to Canon.  You're already going down a path that doesn't sound like it will end well.  

 

Start here:

 

https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/support/service-repair/repair

 

Get an estimate and see what direction you want to go in.

 

If the cost to repair is prohibative...  This is what I would do.

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-s-17-55-f-28-is-usm-refurbished

~Rick
Bay Area - CA
~6D2 ~Many Lenses ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~Windows10 Pro ~EVGA RTX 2080 FTW3 Ultra ~Pixma Pro-100
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VIP
Posts: 9,670
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

I think the lens is probably toasted, dead and gone.  It is cost prohibitive to repair it.  Do not hold high hopes for your lens when and if you contact Canon Support.  The best "repair" for your current lens is probably the used lens market.  People are selling those reasons for a multitude of reasons, and most of the reasons would probably bring a frown to your face.

 

If you had to buy a new lens, what would be your budget?  What sort of stuff do you lthink that you ike to photograph?  LOL.  What sort of photographs do you capture most often?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Reputable Contributor
Posts: 972
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

I agree with Wadizzle that this lens is inexpensive enough that it isn't worth sending in for repair because labor costs and parts would certainly be more than a refurb version of this lens.

 

If you are mechanically competent, get a quality set of precision screwdrivers and find the one that properly fits the screw head and you may find that it is repairable.  And although you have to use care, I have found that with damaged screws a small impact driver (NOT the big air or electric types meant for automotive work but the smaller electric units designed for typical hardware) is excellent for removing small screws.  The key is with these devices all you have to do is hold the tool so that the bit stays firmly in the fastener while the tool provides all of the turning torque instead of you having to do both at once in the case of a regular screwdriver.  I have used these small impact drivers countless times when repairing older electronic gear where it cleanly removes fasteners with ease rather than damaging the head.

 

However I think you ultimately are going to end up with a new lens and spend some time deciding if that next lens will be another 18-55 or if there is something else that is going to serve you better long term.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video
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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,963
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

He needs a JIS screwdriver which will be stripped by a phillips every time.

 

I suggest iFixit as a source of tools.

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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎04-16-2020

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

There's something very special about metal screws over-torqued into plastic flanges and Japanese over-torque like nobody else, transplanted factories or no.

 

Good luck finding scredrivers that won't chew or be chewed and please report back to us if you do.

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Reputable Contributor
Posts: 972
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

[ Edited ]

I bought my JIS bit set from McMaster Carr several years ago, for small electronics and cameras you need JIS sizes 000 through 1.   I bought a set of 12 separate bits (2 each from 000 through #3)  and also a set of precision replaceable tip screwdrivers several years ago and they have worked fine and held up well.  They don't seem to carry the tiny separate bits anymore but they do still have the precision screwdrivers with replaceable tips in the sizes that you will need.

 

I would stay away from Amazon and Ebay for stuff like this unless it is a known name brand tool.  In many cases you can get away with a "consumer grade" cheap tool when it won't get much use but in the case of a driver bit the odds are very good that you will destroy the fastener head on your first attempt with a cheap tool that has a poorly formed bit and you really don't want to have to try an EZ out or similar on a precision piece of optical gear.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video
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VIP
Posts: 12,547
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

I agree with Rick

"I'd send it to Canon.  You're already going down a path that doesn't sound like it will end well."

 

The first part is free so if it is to high don't do it.  And, the second part, it may not end well in the end is right.

I generally discourage new to camera gear folks from attempting DIY repair but if it is a total loss, why not.  Go for it!

 

Keep in mind you may find parts and tools difficult to find.  You may find a new lens is the cheapest way out.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,440
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm


@ebiggs1 wrote:

I agree with Rick

"I'd send it to Canon.  You're already going down a path that doesn't sound like it will end well."

 

The first part is free so if it is to high don't do it.  And, the second part, it may not end well in the end is right.

I generally discourage new to camera gear folks from attempting DIY repair but if it is a total loss, why not.  Go for it!

 

Keep in mind you may find parts and tools difficult to find.  You may find a new lens is the cheapest way out.


I think Ernie has a point. You're almost certainly not going to fix the lens, bur you may learn something useful, or at least interesting, about how lenses are put together. If you have the time, go for it.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎04-16-2020

Re: Repairing Zoom 18-55mm

Thanks for that info, wq9nsc.

 

The last time I needed tools for the camera guts I had strewn all over was before the internet. :-D

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