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New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-11-2014

High speed indoor shooting

I shoot a lot of indoor gymanstics.  I have the 135 2.0 lens but still battle with blur.  Is the 85mm 1.2 an appropriate lens or is it best left for portrait work.  I've read a fair amount about it and seen some conflicting info.

Moderator
Posts: 564
Registered: ‎11-20-2012

Re: High speed indoor shooting

Hi Lordaniel!

 

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New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-11-2014

Re: High speed indoor shooting

I use an EOS 7D.  I mentioned I have the 135 2.0 lens.  I also have the 200 2.8.  Most of my shooting is indoors at 30 to 70 feet from my target.  I'm looking for a lens that will allow me to capture fast moving gymnasts without a lot noise from turning up the ISO.  I've been looking at the 85 1.2 but have seen comments that it is not a sports lens.  For the price, I don't want to risk be dissatisfied.

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 38
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: High speed indoor shooting

Both lenses are stellar lenses. The 85 1.2 is no doubt one of Canon’s best L lenses and perfect for portrait photography. The 85 has one of the creamiest bokeh I have seen from Canon lenses. However I would not use this for high speed indoor shooting because this lens is quite big and chunky and is slow as a tortoise (especially when focusing). The 135 2 is also a good lens, but I find the range very limiting and not that useful. For high speed indoor shooting I would rather shoot with a lens that is more versatile, because with primes your range is quite limited. I prefer the 70-200 2.8 because due to its versatility (range), IS IS IS IS (image stabilization), and its large aperture (which will give you nice blur) if its from theater to outdoor sports. I hope this helps   

I like DSLRs and a Gear Whore.

Canon:
Canon EOS 1Dx, EF 35mm f/1.4L USM, EF 50mm f/1.2L USM, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM IS II, EF 200mm f/2.0L IS USM

Nikon:
Nikon D4, Nikon D800, Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 Super Speed 50mm T/1.5, Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED, Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II, Nikkor 300mm f/2.8G ED VR II
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 38
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: High speed indoor shooting

http://www.cameralabs.com/lenses/lens_buyers_guide/Canon_EF_lenses/Which_telephoto_lens/Which_Canon_...

 

this should help out

I like DSLRs and a Gear Whore.

Canon:
Canon EOS 1Dx, EF 35mm f/1.4L USM, EF 50mm f/1.2L USM, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM IS II, EF 200mm f/2.0L IS USM

Nikon:
Nikon D4, Nikon D800, Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 Super Speed 50mm T/1.5, Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED, Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II, Nikkor 300mm f/2.8G ED VR II
Reputable Contributor
Posts: 759
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: High speed indoor shooting

[ Edited ]

I use the EF 24-70/2.8 and EF  70-200/2.8 IS quite a bit for sports photography, indoors and out.

 

Indoor lighting might force you to use a fairly high ISO on your camera, in order to get a fast enought shutter speed. I use 7D up to 1600 any time and 3200 without too much concern, just a little extra noise reduction in post-processing.

 

As mentioned, the 85/1.2L is a wonderful portrait lens, but not designed for sports. With such a large aperture lens, depth of field is naturally very shallow. So precise focusing is important. The 85/1.2L appears to have what's called "long throw" focus... this is slower, but more precise, by design.  

 

Among other lenses, I also use the 135/2, EF 85/1.8 and EF 50/1.4 for sports. Unlike the 85/1.2, they are quite fast focusing and very capable of keeping up with fast action. Your 200/2.8 should offer similarly fast performance. Prime lenses aren't as convenient as zooms, but many offer at least one stop larger aperture than any zoom. So you have to weigh the need for all the light you can gather against the convenience of a zoom.

 

***********
Alan Myers

San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & PRINTROOM 

 





Frequent Contributor
Posts: 38
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: High speed indoor shooting

Dear sir,

I have used the lens you have recommended for high speed indoor shooting, however I would disagree with you. Because 24-70 is not a useful range for sports unless you are shooting with more than one body. From my understanding shooting sports typically referring to more tight portraits of athletes while as shooting their movement. The primes you listed also are a good choice, however due to the limited range you will miss more possible shots. I have shot with 24-70, 70-200 and 200 f2 for sports, and I have concluded the range 70-200 would be more suited and more versatile. But 24-70 is useless, but one can consider the 16-35 for the environmental shot. 'Excuse for my horrible enligsh Smiley Sad
I like DSLRs and a Gear Whore.

Canon:
Canon EOS 1Dx, EF 35mm f/1.4L USM, EF 50mm f/1.2L USM, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM IS II, EF 200mm f/2.0L IS USM

Nikon:
Nikon D4, Nikon D800, Carl Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2 Super Speed 50mm T/1.5, Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED, Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II, Nikkor 300mm f/2.8G ED VR II
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,860
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: High speed indoor shooting

Sounds tough. You already have the lenses one would suggest. A full frame camera would allow you to use higher ISO's.

I do not know what kind of environment you're shooting in. My kids are little so as a photographer I am free to do all kinds of things at their peewee soccer games. If they were older and the sport was serious I probably couldn't do a lot of what I do. A simple cheap solution would be to mount a very very simple constantly-on light (from hardware store?) on a light stand.
Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-11-2014

Re: High speed indoor shooting

Thanks all.  All your comments are on target for my issue.  Sounds like I need a full frame camera or learn to use higher ISO and processing software.

VIP
Posts: 10,651
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: High speed indoor shooting

Contrary to other thoughts Alan has the correct solution;

"I use the EF 24-70/2.8 and EF  70-200/2.8 IS quite a bit for sports photography, indoors and out."


This is as good as it gets from Canon. Remember f-ratio is not the single consideration to photography. Alan is aware of this fact.

Another fact is the 24-70mm on your camera is more in line with a 38-112. This is a very friendly range for indoor sports. Now couple it with the 70-200mm (112-320m) and you basically have it covered. Reasonable aperture and very fast reliable focus performance.

A prime lens i.e. 135mm f2 is more difficult to use for sports and likely why no pro I know of uses one (for sports).

Your 7D is very useable at 1600 and even 3200 ISO. WIth 320mm, equivalent, you should not need great enlargements so high ISO should not be a problem.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with less and less other stuff.
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