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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-14-2018

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

I agree. Had very good luck with the 400mm F5.6. The thing is, everything in Wildlife photography is far away.

The 400mm F5.6 is good at middle distance, but beyond that crops at 100% start breaking down.

The 896mm combination gives just that more reach. And when 896mm is too much, pulling back on the zoom is really nice.

Especially when images are sharp across the whole range.

I think the image stabilization is also a plus when shooting at 896mm on the Canon 100-400mm.

I like shooting at a shutter speed of 2000 at f/10 for field of view sharpness.

In low light I can drop down to a shutter of 800, and then shoot at f/8, with good images at ISO 2000-5000.

Extremely flexible.

VIP
Posts: 9,556
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

"The thing is, everything in Wildlife photography is far away."

 

Exactly, that is why it is a difficult challenge to do.  However, the answer is not more FL in this case.  Especially nearly 900mm.

900mm is never going to be easy and you are going to have less than the best shots. The distance has become your enemy.  The atmosphere is a problem. You need to spend more effort on getting closer.

 

This shot was about 30 yards which is way farther away than I like to shoot.  I had to crop it farther than I like also.

_DX_2341.jpg

 

I know it is duffucult to get close to some wildlife and some you don't even want to be too close.  But it is the best solution if you want the best results. 900mm of FL is not the best answer.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with, a lot of other stuff.
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-14-2018

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

Well, here’s some quick shots at 896mm.

Where you just can’t get any closer:

5BFD67B4-B1B3-44BA-AED3-1329B8158EB2.jpeg3E6A9810-3EBA-455A-BC26-6F9A15D5C4FA.jpegD5FD15EB-619B-49C3-994A-386A97B0C235.jpegE76AC114-BB26-4DC2-92BF-363567DB1442.jpeg118797A3-0887-40F2-8E29-366F896DD12A.jpeg65C92218-2D2B-4F14-BCBD-583F6CC14A52.jpeg

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-14-2018

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

Still more at 896mm

19F60221-EC06-44FA-A210-11C186968B92.jpeg7495D7A3-9F83-48A5-B288-C4B6BAAF7E0D.jpeg52929D83-A342-4CFE-8777-EA8CC6720555.jpeg8DF2C171-EC96-4F88-895E-122E93E0DEED.jpeg

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,517
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

With birds, the best approach, if you have the patience, is to try to befriend them. Once they get the idea that you always have a treat available, they'll let you get as close as you need to. (A related proverb is that a National Park animal never turns down a free meal.) A few years ago there was a guy on another forum who routinely got fantastic pictures of hummingbirds. He did it by setting up a feeder that dispensed some sort of flavored sugar water that he knew they liked. Most people rarely see a hummingbird outside of a zoo. He had to practically swat them away.

 

When our kids were small, they liked to feed the wild ducks that frequented a pond in back of our house. I remember one day when they didn't get out there soon enough, and that year's duck family came up and started banging on the back door to get their attention.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
VIP
Posts: 9,556
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

Your shots are really nice.  They are as good as you can likely expect.  The only way I see to get better IQ is to use less FL and get closer.  However, you say that is impossible.   With the increased distance you start fighting the air it self.  Besides the resolution of any lens goes down as distance to subject increases.  I know everybody wants to improve and get forever better but in your case I think closing the distance is all that is left.  You are doing fine using what you have and the situation presented to you.

 

Like Robert suggested, tempting the animals with treats or perhaps camo clothing or a blind, etc.  That is what is left.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with, a lot of other stuff.
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-14-2018

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

Thanks!

My original concern was how my Canon 400mm F5.6 seemed to struggle when adding a 1.4x Extender.

So much so in image softness and missed out of focus shots, that I rarely used the 1.4x Extender.

Really felt like the single AF point at f/8 was struggling.

Watching some YouTube video on the Canon 80D, and it’s new support of 27 AF points using a Canon 1.4x Extender III,

had me buying a refurbished Canon 80D and a refurbished Canon 100-400mm II from Canon USA.

 

https://youtu.be/Ir6kkSFS618

 

The AF tracking was fast and almost all my shots were in focus and sharp, on the Canon 80D.

Some get excited about the Canon 7D Mark II 10 frames a second.

But if 6 out of 10 are not in focus or sharp, 10 frames doesn’t buy you very much.

 

Many look at Sigma or Tamron 150-600mm to get that extra reach.

I hear from those who have those lenses, they all struggle at the high end.

 

The Canon 100-400mm II with the Canon 1.4x Extender III on a Canon 80D is a great alternative.

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,538
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender


@JosephKarpinskiwrote:

Thanks!

My original concern was how my Canon 400mm F5.6 seemed to struggle when adding a 1.4x Extender.

So much so in image softness and missed out of focus shots, that I rarely used the 1.4x Extender.

Really felt like the single AF point at f/8 was struggling.

Watching some YouTube video on the Canon 80D, and it’s new support of 27 AF points using a Canon 1.4x Extender III,

had me buying a refurbished Canon 80D and a refurbished Canon 100-400mm II from Canon USA.

 

https://youtu.be/Ir6kkSFS618

 

The AF tracking was fast and almost all my shots were in focus and sharp, on the Canon 80D.

Some get excited about the Canon 7D Mark II 10 frames a second.

But if 6 out of 10 are not in focus or sharp, 10 frames doesn’t buy you very much.

 

Many look at Sigma or Tamron 150-600mm to get that extra reach.

I hear from those who have those lenses, they all struggle at the high end.

 

The Canon 100-400mm II with the Canon 1.4x Extender III on a Canon 80D is a great alternative.

 


The AF system in the 80D is at least the equal o the 7D2.  It is next level better, IMHO.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,939
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: 896mm Comparison Canon 400mm F5.6 vs Canon 100-400mm II on Canon 80D with a Canon 1,4x Extender

Audubon’s Guide to Ethical Bird Photography


Respect for birds and their habitats must come before getting that perfect shot. Here's how to be a responsible bird photographer.


The first essential element in bird photography is a sincere respect for the birds and their environment. In any conflict of interest, the well-being of the birds and their habitats must come before the ambitions of the photographer. Here are some basic guidelines.

 

Avoid causing unnecessary disturbance or stress to birds.


Use a telephoto lens or a blind for close-up shots. If your approach causes a bird to flush (fly or run away) or change its behavior, you’re too close.


Some birds may “freeze” in place rather than flying away, or may hunch into a protective, aggressive, or pre-flight stance. Watch for changes in posture indicating that the birds are stressed, and if you see these, back away.


Never advance on a bird with the intention of making it fly.


Use flash sparingly (if at all), as a supplement to natural light. Avoid the use of flash on nocturnal birds at night, as it may temporarily limit their ability to hunt for food.


Before sharing locations of specific birds with other photographers or birders, think carefully about potential impacts to the birds or their habitats.


Concern for birds’ habitat is also essential. Be aware of your surroundings. Avoid trampling sensitive vegetation or disturbing other wildlife.


Nesting birds are particularly vulnerable and need special consideration


Keep a respectful distance from the nest. If you’re using a macro lens or including the nest as a focal point in an image with a wide-angle lens, even if you’re operating the camera remotely, you’re probably too close. Telephoto lenses of at least 500mm are recommended.


Avoid flushing the adults, scaring the young, or doing anything to draw the attention of predators to the nest. For example, repeatedly walking to a nest can leave both a foot trail and scent trail for predators.


Do not move or remove anything around the nest, as it may be providing both essential camouflage and protection from the elements.


Never use drones to photograph nests, as they can cause injury and stress to the nestlings and parents.


Luring birds closer for photography is often possible but should be done in a responsible way.


Birdfeeding stations, whether or not they’re used for photography, should be kept clean, stocked only with appropriate food items, and positioned with the birds’ safety in mind.


Never lure hawks or owls with live bait, or with decoys such as artificial or dead mice. Baiting can change the behavior of these predatory birds in ways that are harmful for them.


Playback of bird voices to lure them close for photography should be used sparingly, and not at all in the case of endangered birds, or birds at critical points in their nesting cycle.


Show respect for private and public property and consideration for other people.


Enter private land only with permission. On public property such as parks and refuges, be aware of local regulations, hours, and closed areas.


In group situations be considerate of other photographers and birders who may be watching the same bird. Remember that your desire to photograph the bird doesn’t outweigh the rights of others to observe it. Remember also that large groups of people are potentially more disturbing to birds, so it may be necessary to keep a greater distance.

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