Canon Community Canon Community
 


Reply
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎05-06-2014

3ti wide lens?

I recently bought a Canon 3ti kit with the standard 18-55 lens.

I am a realtor and need to often take photos of smaller rooms.  I do not want the fish bowl effect but I would like to be able to shoot wider and get more of the room than just one corner.

What do I need to look for in a lens that can do this?  Or is it possibly a setting on the camera that I have not discovered?  

I am a super novice with the camera.  So far I have only mastered the 'auto' setting.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎02-28-2013

Re: 3ti wide lens?

Canon 10-22.  I'd go so far as to say that it, with a Rebel, has become the industry standard for RE photography.  It's a great lens, I miss it terribly since moving to FF.

New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎05-06-2014

Re: 3ti wide lens?

So far I am enjoying it but it is a bit overwhelming. I need to learn my way off of the auto mode. It has worked well except for rooms with a lot of light coming in through the windows. I can't seem to balance the light in the picture.
Thanks for the quick reply on the lens!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: 3ti wide lens?

Read your manual re using Exposure Compensation in Program (or most modes other than Auto or full manual). That should help with the brightness but you may also need to learn how to shoot some of those situations using the flash & / or Flash Exposure Compensation. Practice a bit & it will become second nature.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎02-28-2013

Re: 3ti wide lens?

There’s only going to be so much you can do with balancing light.  Exposure compensation or manual settings can help, but there are limits.  Bright sunlight coming in a window into a dark room covers too wide a spectrum for the camera.  RE photographers use a technique called HDR or use external lighting, or both.  Both topics are outside the scope of this conversation, but there is plenty of information already out there if you’re interested.  Even a single flash, put on your camera and shot straight up into the ceiling can help a lot.  What you’re trying to do is bring the light level of the room up to the light level outside.  Even for night shots or those without windows a flash can help lighten up those dark corners.  When I do RE photography I routinely use 4 flashes, and mix in some HDR, but it’s not necessary to go to that extreme.

 

There’s a wide spectrum of quality in RE photography, from point and shoot realtors using iPhones, to high end architectural photography, and everything in between.  If all you’re looking for is a basic photo to get people in the door, then there’s no need for extremes.  But this could be a great opportunity to learn something about photography and positively affect your business if you’re up for it.

New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎05-06-2014

Re: 3ti wide lens?

Your last statement is my intent. I despise the horrible photos that I see on listings out there. The photos are what get people in the door. And poor quality is not at all in the best interest of my business.
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎02-28-2013

Re: 3ti wide lens?

Glad to hear that.  The RE world needs more photographers.  Personally, I believe that good photography can have a significant impact on pulling in clients, but not everyone believes that. Again, I tend to go to extremes when it comes to image quality, but I’m a photographer, not a realtor.

 

This is probably more info than you’re looking for, but here’s some elements that could have a big impact on your photography.  Any one of these changes would improve your photography, more will improve it more:

 

  • New Lens: this is a no brainer.  You need wide angle for RE photography
  • Manual Exposure: Your camera can only guess the proper exposure, and it tends to guess poorly when there’s a bright light source in a darker room.  RE photography is a great way to learn manual exposure, the house isn’t going anywhere.  Start simple, say ISO 400, aperture f/5.6 (ok with 10-22), shutter 1/30 (you’ll need a tripod).  If it’s too bright or dark then move the shutter speed up or down.  Simple.  And consistent.
  • Flash: It really makes a big difference.  Even a single flash on the camera will help.  Doesn’t have to be automatic (TTL), a cheap manual flash is fine – but you need to have learned manual exposure first.  Or get something like the Canon 430exII and you can still shoot automatic.
  • Post Processing: There are many options, but I’m just going to tell you to go buy Lightroom 5 (or wait a couple months for 6).  It’s like $100, which isn’t a bad investment for work.  This will allow you to fix lens distortion from the 10-22, correct perspective, adjust exposure (shoot in RAW), clean up noise, sharpen, fix color casts, etc.  Even just a basic understanding of LR will have a significant impact on your work.
  • HDR: This is much more advanced.  I don’t care for the majority of HDR out there, but used in moderation it’s a good tool to have in your arsenal.  I do a manual version in Photoshop where I blend together multiple photos where I underexpose for a bright window and overexpose a dark corner, etc.  Don’t worry about this for now.
  • Off Camera Flash: Also more advanced, and also don’t worry about it now, just letting you know what’s out there.  But this is how the big guys shoot.  Multiple flashes placed around a room.  Personally I find it a lot of fun, not everyone does. 
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: 3ti wide lens?

I think you might enjoy some of Steve's (Veroman) tips here based on your desire to get it right.

 

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1050632/0

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
powered by Lithium

LIKE US on Facebook FOLLOW US on Twitter WATCH US on YouTube CONNECT WITH US on Linkedin WATCH US on Vimeo FOLLOW US on Instagram SHOP CANON at the Canon Online Store
© Canon U.S.A., Inc.   |    Terms of Use   |    Privacy Statement