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New Camera Choice T7i or T8i (or if really worth it 90D)

foreverteachabl
Contributor

Good day all, I am soon to be a Canon user. I look forward to joining what appears to be a great community. I fish a lot, metal detect (treasure hunt,) just got into mushroom hunting, and I love taking macro pictures, and nature scenes. I have the Nikon D3500 and love it but my wife wants a touch screen and gave me the OK to get a new camera for our first trip to Iceland 🙂 Her friend has the T7i so I was thninking of that or the T8i and invest in the 18-55 f2.8 for the trip along with the Rokinon 16 mm f/2 that I purchased prematurely after doing some research before joining this community. 

I would like help deciding on the better of the 2 cameras that I mentioned above. (or if really worth it, the 90D, which would cut down on lens options due to budget) I am an amateur with aspirations but mainly want to enlarge some of my own photos and frame them since friends on Facebook keep telling me to do so. In terms of functions on the body, I  found that I like to adjust ISO's and exposure manually, and have never used the premade setting on the Nikon. I may still choose to do so though on a new camera though. 

I would also like some lense suggestions as well please. I really only used my Nikon nifty fifty and the kit 70-300 lens. Both served me well but I was hoping for a little better quality for the zoom and with image stabilization since I have a slight essential tremor and not the steadiest 🙂

 

Thanks everyone for your help

9 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Be sure the lens has firmware 2.03. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

View solution in original post

"The 90D is a high megapixel crop sensor camera, and as such has among the smallest pixel pitch of any Canon camera. 

It basically boiled down to the fact that the 90D can exceed the capability of some shooters and lenses."

 

John is correct. When you get in to specs and ability that a camera like the 90D everything has to be on its A game. It is diffidently not a "point and shoot" camera if you are looking for the best IQ. The EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens is a wonderful lens. It is the best Canon has to offer in this category. Best fact is, it is a constant f2.8 aperture. The Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens is sharper, no doubt. Also a constant aperture lens at f1.8.

 

However, since you have already ordered the EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens, I and you will be happy using it. Perhaps you do give up a bit of IQ but you gain 20mm on the long end. That's worht something and will make it more versitile. 

 

If you still feel you want or need the sharpest photos possible I would buy the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art (prime) Lens. It just might be the sharpest lens on the planet for a DSLR like the 90D. Again, it is diffidently not a "point and shoot" camera if you are looking for the best out of it. Do your part and it will do its part. 

 

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

View solution in original post

"The 6D Mark II would be a superior camera at a higher entry price."

 

I would dispute that a little. If IQ was your main most important thing, and I thought is was, the 90D and the Siggy zoom will likely beat a 6D2. When you talk IQ you need to know what lens is on which camera. The camera is part of the equation. The lens makes the picture, the camera simply stores it. Of course that a simplistic statement but generally true.

 

The reviewers said, even some here on this forum, said you can't do landscapes with a crop style camera. Also, you can't get undistorted photos from the ef-8-15mm f4 lens. Don't believe all the reviews you read on the ole inner web. Most at least some are biased and/or have personal agenda. I don't.

 

IMG_2025.JPG

Canon EOS 7D, EF 8-15mm f4L@ 15mm, f16, SS1/400, ISO160

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

View solution in original post

"... and a 35mm macro IS because it is so fun and light."

 

I see little value in adding another 35mm even though it is or claims to be a macro lens. I really doubt you will use it much after using the Sigma 18-35mm f1.8 Art lens.  I will grant you the Siggy zoom is not light so that might be an issue if "lightness" is a factor.

 

What brand name is the 35nn macro?

 

"I decided to stick with the T8i ..."

 

I'm good with that. It is the best Rebel Canon ever made and if both of you like it, that a win. Now slap that Siggy on it and go make some great photos.

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

View solution in original post

I would suggest it might be tripod specific (not knowing your exact setup) but the Rebel itself will be the same as the Nikon. I would go slowly and shoot for a while and just see what additional gear you may need. Sometimes buying right off quickly means buying twice. Not as much fun!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

View solution in original post

I kind of lost track of which camera you decided to go with but since you're new to Canon, may I suggest that you spend another $30 and get David Busch's book specific to the camera you purchased? I bought mine on Amazon. I find his manuals useful because where the Canon manual tells the "how", David's books tell the "why." He doesn't go into technique or post processing but you can look up any setting on the camera and find an explanation of what it does and the setting he recommends, also how auto focusing works, etc.

 

Two more tips: The paper copy of the camera manual that comes inside the box is not a complete manual. To get the complete manual, go to the Canon website and then to your camera's page (which you should bookmark anyway to check for any firmware updates, utility softwar, etc.), and under the tab "Manuals", you will find the complete user manual which you can download. It's nice too because you can search for key words.

 

Next tip: you might already be using a post-processing program that you're happy with but don't overlook the free app that Canon offers called Digital Photo Professional. I find it useful in many ways, just two being that if I want to see exactly where the camera was focusing, I can see that on my computer screen. Another really handy feature is photo stacking. If you get the 90D, it has a focus bracketing feature that automatically take a series of photos at different focusing distances so you can achieve maximum depth of field (especially handy for closeups and macro). With DPP, you just select the first picture in the series and activate the "Depth Compositing" feature, and it will automatically stack the pictures for you. You can get this app by going to your camera's page on Canon and choose the tab "Drivers & Downloads."

 

Have a great trip to Iceland and I hope you will have time beforehand to get to you know your camera and the settings customized.

View solution in original post


@Wandalynn wrote:

I kind of lost track of which camera you decided to go with but since you're new to Canon, may I suggest that you spend another $30 and get David Busch's book specific to the camera you purchased? I bought mine on Amazon. I find his manuals useful because where the Canon manual tells the "how", David's books tell the "why." He doesn't go into technique or post processing but you can look up any setting on the camera and find an explanation of what it does and the setting he recommends, also how auto focusing works, etc.

 

Two more tips: The paper copy of the camera manual that comes inside the box is not a complete manual. To get the complete manual, go to the Canon website and then to your camera's page (which you should bookmark anyway to check for any firmware updates, utility softwar, etc.), and under the tab "Manuals", you will find the complete user manual which you can download. It's nice too because you can search for key words.

 

Next tip: you might already be using a post-processing program that you're happy with but don't overlook the free app that Canon offers called Digital Photo Professional. I find it useful in many ways, just two being that if I want to see exactly where the camera was focusing, I can see that on my computer screen. Another really handy feature is photo stacking. If you get the 90D, it has a focus bracketing feature that automatically take a series of photos at different focusing distances so you can achieve maximum depth of field (especially handy for closeups and macro). With DPP, you just select the first picture in the series and activate the "Depth Compositing" feature, and it will automatically stack the pictures for you. You can get this app by going to your camera's page on Canon and choose the tab "Drivers & Downloads."

 

Have a great trip to Iceland and I hope you will have time beforehand to get to you know your camera and the settings customized.


Great advice. 

Here is another source of good material: I can't link to it, but search for Nina Bailey books. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

View solution in original post

I also think that is good advice, too, but actual shooting is best. Shoot and shoot a lot. Notice what works and what doesn't. That's another reason why post editing is so very important. It allows you to see more of what can and can't be done. What works and what doesn't.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

View solution in original post

Thank you. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

View solution in original post

42 REPLIES 42

I kind of lost track of which camera you decided to go with but since you're new to Canon, may I suggest that you spend another $30 and get David Busch's book specific to the camera you purchased? I bought mine on Amazon. I find his manuals useful because where the Canon manual tells the "how", David's books tell the "why." He doesn't go into technique or post processing but you can look up any setting on the camera and find an explanation of what it does and the setting he recommends, also how auto focusing works, etc.

 

Two more tips: The paper copy of the camera manual that comes inside the box is not a complete manual. To get the complete manual, go to the Canon website and then to your camera's page (which you should bookmark anyway to check for any firmware updates, utility softwar, etc.), and under the tab "Manuals", you will find the complete user manual which you can download. It's nice too because you can search for key words.

 

Next tip: you might already be using a post-processing program that you're happy with but don't overlook the free app that Canon offers called Digital Photo Professional. I find it useful in many ways, just two being that if I want to see exactly where the camera was focusing, I can see that on my computer screen. Another really handy feature is photo stacking. If you get the 90D, it has a focus bracketing feature that automatically take a series of photos at different focusing distances so you can achieve maximum depth of field (especially handy for closeups and macro). With DPP, you just select the first picture in the series and activate the "Depth Compositing" feature, and it will automatically stack the pictures for you. You can get this app by going to your camera's page on Canon and choose the tab "Drivers & Downloads."

 

Have a great trip to Iceland and I hope you will have time beforehand to get to you know your camera and the settings customized.


@Wandalynn wrote:

I kind of lost track of which camera you decided to go with but since you're new to Canon, may I suggest that you spend another $30 and get David Busch's book specific to the camera you purchased? I bought mine on Amazon. I find his manuals useful because where the Canon manual tells the "how", David's books tell the "why." He doesn't go into technique or post processing but you can look up any setting on the camera and find an explanation of what it does and the setting he recommends, also how auto focusing works, etc.

 

Two more tips: The paper copy of the camera manual that comes inside the box is not a complete manual. To get the complete manual, go to the Canon website and then to your camera's page (which you should bookmark anyway to check for any firmware updates, utility softwar, etc.), and under the tab "Manuals", you will find the complete user manual which you can download. It's nice too because you can search for key words.

 

Next tip: you might already be using a post-processing program that you're happy with but don't overlook the free app that Canon offers called Digital Photo Professional. I find it useful in many ways, just two being that if I want to see exactly where the camera was focusing, I can see that on my computer screen. Another really handy feature is photo stacking. If you get the 90D, it has a focus bracketing feature that automatically take a series of photos at different focusing distances so you can achieve maximum depth of field (especially handy for closeups and macro). With DPP, you just select the first picture in the series and activate the "Depth Compositing" feature, and it will automatically stack the pictures for you. You can get this app by going to your camera's page on Canon and choose the tab "Drivers & Downloads."

 

Have a great trip to Iceland and I hope you will have time beforehand to get to you know your camera and the settings customized.


Great advice. 

Here is another source of good material: I can't link to it, but search for Nina Bailey books. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

I also think that is good advice, too, but actual shooting is best. Shoot and shoot a lot. Notice what works and what doesn't. That's another reason why post editing is so very important. It allows you to see more of what can and can't be done. What works and what doesn't.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

foreverteachabl
Contributor
Wow just saw your comment. Thanks so much for the great information!

foreverteachabl
Contributor
Thanks so much!

foreverteachabl
Contributor
Thanks again. I did get the 8Ti. I tried the 14mm f2.8 Rokinon which was a great feeling lens with built in lens hood and great cap, but must have got a poor copy since image quality was affected. I got a used Canon 100mm macro, a canon 35 mm macro, tested us to a new 70-200mm F4L, and returned the Sigma 18-35 F1.8 due too image quality. I'm still looking for the wide angle lens with northern light capabilities and think your suggestion for the Canon 17-55 f2.8 might be the best unless the 16-35 f/4 would work


@foreverteachabl wrote:
Thanks again. I did get the 8Ti. I tried the 14mm f2.8 Rokinon which was a great feeling lens with built in lens hood and great cap, but must have got a poor copy since image quality was affected. I got a used Canon 100mm macro, a canon 35 mm macro, tested us to a new 70-200mm F4L, and returned the Sigma 18-35 F1.8 due too image quality. I'm still looking for the wide angle lens with northern light capabilities and think your suggestion for the Canon 17-55 f2.8 might be the best unless the 16-35 f/4 would work

Rokinon lenses are noted for inconsistent quality control. If yiu get a good copy they are a good buy at the price, but it cna take several tries.

 

I have an Irix 15mm f/2.4 that I usew for my astro shoots - start trails and MW.

Hayes Farm Milky Way_John Hoffman.jpg

 

Chocorua Barn_John Hoffman.jpg

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

Nice shots John. Smiley Happy

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Thank you. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

foreverteachabl
Contributor
Thanks everyone for all your help!!!
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