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Canon rumor

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

The various tech and rumor sites are stating that their Canon sources are indicating that Canon may unveil an entry-level full-frame mirrorless, the EOS R, as early as September 5, which would be in time for Photokina later in the month.

 

This one is specced similarly to the enthusiast-level Nikon Z6. And the cost would be roughtly the same at around $1999. I believe the 6D II was priced at $1999 upon its release. But what is really interesting, is that according to the Canon source, the new EOS R will be able to accommodate EF lenses without an adapter. All of this is rumor, but I hope it is true. 

 

The Canon full-frame mirrorless flagship, to be released a couple of months later, is to compete with the pro-level Nikon Z7.

 

See Canon Rumors, TechRadar, PetaPixel, etc. 

31 REPLIES 31

RobertTheFat
Honored Contributor

If the camera will use EF lenses without an adapter, doesn't that mean that it won't be able to use M lenses? If Canon were going to go that route, why are their new high-end mirrorless FF cameras still based on the M format?

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

@RobertTheFat wrote:

If the camera will use EF lenses without an adapter, doesn't that mean that it won't be able to use M lenses? If Canon were going to go that route, why are their new high-end mirrorless FF cameras still based on the M format?


That I can't answer, but according to CanonRumors:

 

"...it’s a working theory that the RF and EF mount will differ slightly and EF lenses will mount on the RF mount and cause it to “switch” to the EF protocol. If you mount an RF lens, it will switch back to the native RF protocol to support the lens.  Interestingly, this locks the RF mount up into Canon’s patent portfolio which will make it difficult for third party mount adapters to support on other camera bodies.

 

"Right now the information coming from sources is extremely vague.  Canon is keeping this completely under wraps like no other release that we’ve seen in the past.  This may be entirely conjecture, and may not actually be what Canon is doing, but at this point in time, it sounds like a plausible scenario."

 

It's a new camera world taking shape out there. Out with the old, in with the new. 

Tronhard
Respected Contributor

For what it's worth this was apparently leaked from the Japanese Noki**bleep**a brand registration site.  It shows images of the body, lenses and the unit mounting the EF 100-400 MkII with the MkIII 2x extender attached to an adaptor.

 

https://www.canonwatch.com/category/rumors/canon-rumors/

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

amfoto1
Reputable Contributor

There have been a plethora of rumors... and more leaks than I've seen in years regarding a new camera launch! It's been Canon's worst kept secret! (More leaks than the White House, Senate, House of Representatives, FBI, CIA and Pentagon put together! Smiley Very Happy)

 

Follow the link above for more info....

 

But many of the rumors appear wrong. First, it looks like there will be three adapters to allow current EF/EF-S lenses to be used on the new full frame mirrorless camera, which will be called the EOS R and will be 30MP (like 5D Mark IV). I'd be surprised if it were only $2000.... but haven't seen any priciing yet. We'll have to wait until tomorrow.

 

The reason there are three lens adapters is interesting....

- One adapts EF-mount lenses to the new RF-mount.

- Another does the same, but also has a built-in drawer for drop-in filters. This will be very cool when adapting some of the lenses like the EF 11-24mm or TS-E 17mm, which are difficult to use with filters due to their convex front elements. It also will allow use of smaller, far less expensive filters (I'm guessing 52mm or 58mm) on a lot of lenses that now use 77mm or 82mm. 

- A third adapter is specifically for EF-S lenses. That surprised me, but the EOS R apparently has a "crop mode" that allows it to use the APS-C crop-sensor lenses too!

 

The EOS R appears to have a 20mm lens register (distance from the lens flange to the camera's film/sensor plane). This is nearly an inch shorter than the 44mm or so used in the EOS/EF-mount, and the reason that the adapters are needed. The RF lenses native to the R will not require an adapter and initiall there will be four of those available: RF 35mm f/1.8 IS STM Macro, RF 28-70mm f/2L USM, RF 50mm f/1.2L USM and RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM.

 

Due to the 20mm lens register of the full frame camera, I don't think it will be able to use EF-M lenses, even in crop mode. There aren't a lot of those lenses yet, anyway (and there are rough equivalents of all or most of them in EF or EF-S anyway). But, who knows! Maybe Canon has some trick up their sleeve.

 

A BG-E22 Vertical/Battery Grip also will be available for the R, doubling the battery capacity of the camera (which will use the same LP-E6N as 7DII, 5DIV, etc. Also can use LP-E6, with a few minor limitations).

 

There are a lot of other really cool and interesting features, including what looks to be an amazing auto focus system (over 5000 AF points... pairs of pixels embedded in the sensor and nearly the entire image area covered... and -6EV capability!).

 

Frankly, for my purposes I'll need to stick with my DSLRs for the foreseeable future, in large part due to the 2500+ shots per charge I get with a pair of LP-E6N. Mirrorless have to power up a lot more stuff contiuously while in use, so none are anywhere near as power-efficient as DSLRs.

 

Even so, I can hardly wait until tomorrow to learn more about the new camera!

 

***********


Alan Myers
San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7DII (x2), 7D(x2) some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & ZENFOLIO 

 

 

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

@amfoto1 wrote:

Frankly, for my purposes I'll need to stick with my DSLRs for the foreseeable future, in large part due to the 2500+ shots per charge I get with a pair of LP-E6N. Mirrorless have to power up a lot more stuff contiuously while in use, so none are anywhere near as power-efficient as DSLRs.

 

Even so, I can hardly wait until tomorrow to learn more about the new camera!

 

***********   

 


Those are poor reasons to stick with what will become dead tech.

 

Unless I were quite elderly and already had a fortune tied up in DSLRs and its lenses, I would be thinking not of batteries, but of the need to unload my existing DSLR gear while I can. Virtually all authorites are stating that DSLRs are not the way to spend your gear money now. Their resale value will be abysmal, and sooner rather than later. Of course, that won't matter if you plan to stick with DSLRs for the remainder of your life. But the writing is on the wall and it couldn't be more clear. DSLRs are soon to be a thing of the past and mirrorless is the future, for pro and enthusiast alike. Sure, there are guys who still shoot film. So what? The world has moved on and they haven't.

Tronhard
Respected Contributor

 wrote
Those are poor reasons to stick with what will become dead tech.

Unless I were quite elderly and already had a fortune tied up in DSLRs and its lenses, I would be thinking not of batteries, but of the need to unload my existing DSLR gear while I can. Virtually all authorites are stating that DSLRs are not the way to spend your gear money now. Their resale value will be abysmal, and sooner rather than later. Of course, that won't matter if you plan to stick with DSLRs for the remainder of your life. But the writing is on the wall and it couldn't be more clear. DSLRs are soon to be a thing of the past and mirrorless is the future, for pro and enthusiast alike. Sure, there are guys who still shoot film. So what? The world has moved on and they haven't.


Frankly I find your statements to be over-simplified.

 

First, let's deal with film. It is a valid medium that is actually finding a resurgence right now, as indicated by the proliferation of film products on the market. The companies that are making these products and services are not doing so on a whim, they see a valid business case for them. Those who shoot film (including quite a few professionals), do so because of the specific characteristics of the medium, it certainly isn't because "they haven't moved on."

 

Second, the demise of the DSLR. Both Nikon and Canon have brought out MILC bodies, but it is patently obvious, based on specs and the reaction of the professional community that they are not going to replace DSLRs wholesale. There are many pro photographers out there who:


a) have a huge investment in EF and EF-S lenses and who intend to use them and their bodies for some time to come- because they intend to make the most of their investment. The new platforms will have to prove themselves first - sure there will be early adoptors among professionals but any professional will tell you that it's not the latest tech that makes a great photo, it's the talent of the photographer and how well they know their gear.


b) Looking at the Canon offering, it is spec'd to be more like a replacement for the enthusiast 6DII than the professional 1D or 5D series. Right now Canon are expected to release a 7DIII (professional APS-C DSLR) and an 90D (enthusiast APS-C DSLR), and that indicates an intention to stay with the technology for the time being. Nikon are preparing for the release of the Df II, which if you are familiar with the model is a digital body that harkens back to the interface of an SLR.  THEY see a business case to support this development.

 

Will the MILC dominate in the future... I would agree, but these offerings do not spell the sudden bringing down of the curtain of the DSLR - not according to those professionals I engage with.  The total number of cameras may be dropping, and the point and shoot being massacred by cell phone cameras, but there is still room in the market for more than one type of interchangeable lens camera.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

John_SD
Reputable Contributor

Well, I'm not suggesting that everyone is going to throw away their gear tomorrow and buy version 1 of Canon or Nikon's new full-frame mirrorless offerings. But the two giants have made the path forward quite clear. I don't think a reasonable person could dispute that, regardless of what you think of mirrorless. 

 

I don't have much money invested in DSLRs or lenses. So for me, the decision is easy. I will move to full-frame mirrorless in due course. Personally, if i did have a lot of money tied up in DSLRs, I would be weaning myself off of them. I would not invest any more money and I would be looking to sell my nonessential lenses and camera bodies before the bottom drops out. I'd keep what I can't sell and use it until it meets the end of its useful life.Then I would move into mirrorless. But that's just me. As for film, it is a vestiage of bygone times, despite knowing a few guys who shoot a roll now and then. 

"As for film, it is a vestiage of bygone times, despite knowing a few guys who shoot a roll now and then."

 

Film has moved to the vestige of 'art'.

Canon has already ditched a lens mounting system once.  Will they do it again?  Smiley Frustrated

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Tronhard
Respected Contributor

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"As for film, it is a vestiage of bygone times, despite knowing a few guys who shoot a roll now and then."

 

Film has moved to the vestige of 'art'.

Canon has already ditched a lens mounting system once.  Will they do it again?  Smiley Frustrated

 


John_SD says "I don't have much money invested in DSLRs or lenses. "    So what did you spend your money on, or is this a new thing for you?  How much skin do you have in the game?  If you are a newbie I would agree that careful investment in MILC tech is a good idea, but don't underestime the enormous market out there in DSLRs that the major manufacturers have to support and show respect to.

 

The thing is this is not an 'all or nothing' situation right now or for some time yet.  I have already agreed that this is the beginning of an evolution from DSLR to MILC, that was pretty obviously coming for some time, but both Canon and Nikon have been demonstrably wary of jumping in with both feet - they have left that to Sony and Fujifilm in particular.  Canon are expected to release more DSLR bodies and are supporting the EF mount so they have not suddently switched platforms and left the market hanging, specifically because of the investment of millions of customers throughout the world - that would be poor business strategy.  In support of the EF situation I only have to look at the crop of quality EF lenses that they have just released in the last few months - they, like bodies, take time to develop and they aren't just going to drop them tomorrow, for a start they are still selling well they want to get their money back, and lenses last for a very long time.

 

The comment about film being "a vestige of a bygone age" is simplistic, dismissive, disrepectful and demonstrative of those who see photographic technology as an end in itself rather than a tool to achieve a result. I suggest doing a search on Google for professional photographers who shoot film, and while we are at it read the Time article http://time.com/4646116/film-photography-inspiration/ .  These are successful, high-status photographers who are much sought after and get very well paid because of the quality of their analogue work.

 

As ebiggs1 has said it is most likely connected to art.  Well, the news is that photography is a marriage of technology and technique for a myriad of purposes and art in its various forms is a huge part of that. Most experienced photographers would say that of the two, technique is the more significant a photographer who knows his equipment and the right skills will always beat an unskilled photographer with the latest tech.

 

Supporting analogue technologies is recognized by a growing list of film manufacturers including:

    China Lucky Film - the market in China is growing massively
    Cinestill
    Ferrania (included the Solaris brand. Shut down in 2012, but as of 2017 efforts to revive it are underway)
    Fujifilm
    Ilford Photo (went bankrupt in 2004, but reorganized and restarted production)
    IMAX
    Inoviscoat (An Agfa spin-off that manufactures film components for other brands, including Impossible Project)
    Kodak
    Lomography
    Polaroid Originals (was Impossible Project)
    Rollei (repackages film from other sources, including aerial film manufactured by Agfa-Gevaert in Belgium)
    Tasma

and the list is growing...  there are even companies starting to make new film bodies.  They would not have got past the business case stage from investors if they could not prove a viable market.

 

I used to shoot film professionally, though I have been a digital (professional and non-pro) user for 18 years now, but I recognize the value of the medium and I am not arrogant enough to dismiss those who still see value in it.  I own about $50k worth of digital gear, including MILCs, but I have no intention of selling off my stuff in a panic.  Good luck to those who do.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me