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Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,435
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Where do you store your photos?


cicopo wrote:

I gave up using "back up" software for a similar reason. I plain & simply make copies on my USB drives, & when a desktop drive fills up I print a screen grab of it's contents which goes into the box that drive ends up in on my shelf. The box comes from the new drive I replaced it with. Too many copies is better than no file.  


If you use Microsoft Windows, then I suggest that you give SyncToy are look.  It’s free.  It’s fast.  I use it to run “batch” backups to multiple locations when I import photos from a camera.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Valued Contributor
Posts: 420
Registered: ‎11-19-2017

Re: Where do you store your photos?

I use an 8TB NAS that is backed up locally.  I also use Amazon Photos and Google Drive.     

 

Back up software is good for disaster recovery, Acronis, Macrium (windows guy)

Rick
Bay Area - CA
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New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-09-2018

Re: Where do you store your photos?

On lots of hard drives. 

Super Contributor
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: Where do you store your photos?

[ Edited ]

For the really long-term storage that a lot of people are talking about you had better also keep converting the image files themselves to something that is compatible in that period of time.  50 years from now your heirs definitely aren't going to be able to use current generation RAW files or jpg format.  This is where "data" that is already suitable for human viewing becomes important-the printed image being a prime example of that human compatible data.

 

I have no issue restoring and keeping in operating condition vintage complex communications (i.e. shortwave) receivers from the early 1930s and you could try to extrapolate that to leaving your heirs one of the "electronic photo frames" but especially with the removal of lead to comply with European RoHS standards custom integrated circuits from the modern era aren't going to have anywhere near the life of a 1930s era vacuum tube and there won't be any practical workarounds for your hobbyist great great grandson to repair the old family digital picture frame.  The old engineering adage of KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) is a strong consideration when preserving something for extended periods of time and the more complex the "solution" the more potential points of failure that exist.

 

Today if your great uncle's safe yielded a copy of your complete faimily history on 8" hard sector floppy disks you could find someone who could extract the information but 50 years or more into the future a lot of our current file formats will likely be useless and that old cloud data will present you with the future version of the  current "I don't recognize that file, what app would you like to use" message.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M2, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses
Super Contributor
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Where do you store your photos?


wq9nsc wrote:

 

Today if your great uncle's safe yielded a copy of your complete faimily history on 8" hard sector floppy disks you could find someone who could extract the information but 50 years or more into the future a lot of our current file formats will likely be useless and that old cloud data will present you with the future version of the  current "I don't recognize that file, what app would you like to use" message.


You are one of the very few in this thread who has it right. Relying on hard drives for photo storage is courting disaster -- perhaps not in the current owner's lifetime, but 50 or 100 years from now, all of those photos will be lost. And the future family members of the deceased will wonder why the familty photographer was so careless and shortsighted. 

 

No, printing is the way to go. As I have stated in this thread, I remain grateful to my long-gone grandmother for leaving behind a suitcase full of photos from the early 1930s onward, revealing in detail a world that doesn't exist anymore. Nearly all remain in great condition. 

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