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Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,335
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Items lost in the field

[ Edited ]

@RobertTheFat wrote:

 

And of course what you're prodding me to point out is that polarizers can do at least one thing that Photoshop can't do: remove reflections from bodies of water. PS can neutralize the reflection, but it can't show you what was hidden beneath the reflection.


A polarizer filter can also do its’ job without adding as much distortion as Photoshop, [or Lightroom] would.

 

[EDIT]. Full disclosure, for the record, I use LR, so I do not use CPL or UV filters, anymore.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Valued Contributor
Posts: 303
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Items lost in the field


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"Polarizers have been rendered nearly useless in New England, almost everywhere because of Photoshop."

 

Now Bob before you hit the panic button, I did keep "nearly" in your statement.


And of course what you're prodding me to point out is that polarizers can do at least one thing that Photoshop can't do: remove reflections from bodies of water. PS can neutralize the reflection, but it can't show you what was hidden beneath the reflection.


Another thing Photoshop can't do for you is protect your lens element when you're shooting at the tidepools around splashing salt water, or in the California deserts when the wind is blowing. Neutral density fliters can offer some protection, but they can't perform the double-duty polarizers do. And by shooting in the desert, I don't mean pulling off the road and shooting from the safety of a "Viewpoint." Photoshop would be fine for those snapshots. 

VIP
Posts: 10,381
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Items lost in the field

"Another thing Photoshop can't do for you is protect your lens element ..."

 

I am going to bow to that point and give you the gold star for the day. However, no matter how much Bob protests, PS can or at least the resulting photo will reveal anything the photographer wants it to.  It is just a factor of knowledge and talent about how to use/edit in PS.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with less other stuff.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,335
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Items lost in the field

[ Edited ]

@John_SD wrote:

 

Another thing Photoshop can't do for you is protect your lens element when you're shooting at the tidepools around splashing salt water, or in the California deserts when the wind is blowing. Neutral density fliters can offer some protection, but they can't perform the double-duty polarizers do. And by shooting in the desert, I don't mean pulling off the road and shooting from the safety of a "Viewpoint." Photoshop would be fine for those snapshots. 


No, Photoshop cannot protect your lens, but a Clear filter can.  But, a high quality Clear filter allows you to render better color than any CPL, UV, or ND filter.  IMHO, one thing that separates Canon from the crowd is the color rendering.  

 

Once, I began using B+W filters as protection filters, I noticed an immediate improvement in the color rendering.  I think I had some improvements in exposure metering, and automatic white balance, too.

Besides, if I were shooting around splashing salt water, I would want more protection for my gear than a mere lens filter.  I would go for the full rain cover to protect against the salt mist.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Valued Contributor
Posts: 303
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Items lost in the field


@Waddizzle wrote:

@John_SD wrote:

 

Another thing Photoshop can't do for you is protect your lens element when you're shooting at the tidepools around splashing salt water, or in the California deserts when the wind is blowing. Neutral density fliters can offer some protection, but they can't perform the double-duty polarizers do. And by shooting in the desert, I don't mean pulling off the road and shooting from the safety of a "Viewpoint." Photoshop would be fine for those snapshots. 


No, Photoshop cannot protect your lens, but a Clear filter can.  But, a high quality Clear filter allows you to render better color than any CPL, UV, or ND filter.  IMHO, one thing that separates Canon from the crowd is the color rendering.  

 

Once, I began using B+W filters as protection filters, I noticed an immediate improvement in the color rendering.  I think I had some improvements in exposure metering, and automatic white balance, too.

Besides, if I were shooting around splashing salt water, I would want more protection for my gear than a mere lens filter.  I would go for the full rain cover to protect against the salt mist.


I've never used a Clear filter, as it doesn't sound like it would be useful for me in the environements I'm in. Can such a filter darken washed-out desert skies? 

 

Ernie and others seem to spend a great deal of time making corrections and enhancements in Photoshop. While I don't doubt its power, I want to be able to do as much as I can in-camera, out in the field. IMHO, a CPL is absolutely essential in the desert and when you're knee-deep in saltwater.

 

Your suggestion about the camera cover is well-taken, though, and I suppose I've been lucky that I haven't caught a rogue wave at the tidepools, though as someone who grew up on surfboards, I'm pretty good at reading the waves and knowing when a break is coming, even when my back is to the incoming. They have a certain sound we're attuned to out here. Now rip currents are another matter LOL. 

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,335
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Items lost in the field

I've never used a Clear filter, as it doesn't sound like it would be useful for me in the environements I'm in. Can such a filter darken washed-out desert skies?

 

No, a Clear filter cannot darken skies.  But, post editing software can do it with just a few clicks.  The only thing a filter can do that software cannot is polarize the light entering the lens.  But, software can do an excellent job of bringing out the details in many shots that seem to have washed out skies.

Also, an HDR shot can clean up a washed out sky, too.  Photoshop has a remarkable “dehaze” filter.  But, go with what works for you.  Personally, I would be more inclined to use a UV filter, or a graduated ND filter, to clean up a sky, instead of a CPL filter.  Software can reproduce the effects of UV or ND filter, but not a CPL filter.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,746
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Items lost in the field


@Waddizzle wrote:

I've never used a Clear filter, as it doesn't sound like it would be useful for me in the environements I'm in. Can such a filter darken washed-out desert skies?

 

No, a Clear filter cannot darken skies.  But, post editing software can do it with just a few clicks.  The only thing a filter can do that software cannot is polarize the light entering the lens.  But, software can do an excellent job of bringing out the details in many shots that seem to have washed out skies.

Also, an HDR shot can clean up a washed out sky, too.  Photoshop has a remarkable “dehaze” filter.  But, go with what works for you.  Personally, I would be more inclined to use a UV filter, or a graduated ND filter, to clean up a sky, instead of a CPL filter.  Software can reproduce the effects of UV or ND filter, but not a CPL filter.


One factor that has a limiting effect on the utility of a polarizer is that not all of the light from, say, a washed out sky enters the lens polarized in the same direction. So different parts of the sky will be affected differently. That can impart a degree of unreality to a wide landscape shot. Photoshop, which is indifferent to the polarization of the light that formed the image, doesn't have that problem. Of course the sky is what it is, and what constitutes "reality" in such a case is in the eye of the beholder. But the eye of the beholder is, after all, the intended target.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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Posts: 10,381
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Re: Items lost in the field

"Photoshop, which is indifferent to the polarization of the light that formed the image,..."

 

Which is where you get lost, my friend.  The ability to make such a photo look "right" is in the ability and talent of the PS user.  There is nothing PS can not imitate that a polarizer can do.  Depending on the "ability and talent of the PS user."

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with less other stuff.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,335
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Items lost in the field


@Waddizzle wrote:

I've never used a Clear filter, as it doesn't sound like it would be useful for me in the environements I'm in. Can such a filter darken washed-out desert skies?

 

No, a Clear filter cannot darken skies.  But, post editing software can do it with just a few clicks.  The only thing a filter can do that software cannot is polarize the light entering the lens.  But, software can do an excellent job of bringing out the details in many shots that seem to have washed out skies.

Also, an HDR shot can clean up a washed out sky, too.  Photoshop has a remarkable “dehaze” filter.  But, go with what works for you.  Personally, I would be more inclined to use a UV filter, or a graduated ND filter, to clean up a sky, instead of a CPL filter.  Software can reproduce the effects of UV or ND filter, but not a CPL filter.


6B967110-F771-41D3-9795-5DFC6D190DD2.jpeg

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 10,381
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Items lost in the field

_OS18082-Edit.jpg

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with less other stuff.
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