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Valued Contributor
Posts: 349
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

DSLR prices in Canon store

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With Canon's renewed committment to mirrorless cameras as the way forward, I have watched its DSLR prices enter free-fall. The same holds true for Nikon, as it, too, is looking to the future. I expect this trend to continue. This is a good thing for someone who is looking for a great deal and doesn't mind buying into dead tech.It's a definitely a buyer's market. 

 

I just took a look in the Canon store, and it is selling new 60D Mark II camera bodies for $1299, refurbished for $1099. On release date of 6/17, the body sold for $2000. For someone who wants to move into full frame with the understanding that mirrorless is the future, killer deals can be had on excellent DSLRs. I think it's worth it even if you want to sit on the sidelines for a few years as mirrorless heats up and its prices remain high. I myself would consider dead tech as an entry point into full frame, with the intention of moving into mirrorless a few years down the line. 

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Posts: 11,096
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store

"...mirrorless is the future,..."

 

Maybe so but it does not make a DSLR irrelevant. They will continue to work as they do for many years to come. They don't suddenly stop working just becuase a mirrorless camer comes on to market. There is the possibility the DSLR could go the way of the floppy disk. However, I don’t know a single person who misses the floppy disk. The DSLR is 18 years old.  Will it be here in another 18 years?

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
Valued Contributor
Posts: 349
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store

I agree. 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,807
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store

I don't think I'd say the prices are in "free fall".  It's normal for prices to come down on camera bodies that have been in production for several years.  It seems like every 5D body starts at over $3k (closer to $3500) and eventually makes its way down to nearer to $2500 when Canon has a replacement body.

 

There are still trade-offs to mirrorless cameras.  Without a reflex mirror and focusing screen, the sensor is always powered up to be able to frame and focus any shot.  That will translate into more battery power.   While Canon's Dual-Pixel CMOS AF system works well, I don't think it is as fast as Canon's sports bodies.  I'm not sure how it performs for action-photography.

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,951
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store


@TCampbell wrote:

I don't think I'd say the prices are in "free fall".  It's normal for prices to come down on camera bodies that have been in production for several years.  It seems like every 5D body starts at over $3k (closer to $3500) and eventually makes its way down to nearer to $2500 when Canon has a replacement body.

 

There are still trade-offs to mirrorless cameras.  Without a reflex mirror and focusing screen, the sensor is always powered up to be able to frame and focus any shot.  That will translate into more battery power.   While Canon's Dual-Pixel CMOS AF system works well, I don't think it is as fast as Canon's sports bodies.  I'm not sure how it performs for action-photography.


I think we pretty much have a consensus: Mirrorless cameras are the wave of the future, but they aren't the current state of the art. Nevertheless, you have to start somewhere. And unlike their previous tepid forays into mirrorless, Canon seems to be serious about it this time. And if history provides any clue, and if technology continues to advance as it has, they'll eventually get it right.

 

I hope they'll be able to maintain battery compatibility. I have a lot of LP-E6's and 6N's kicking around.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
Valued Contributor
Posts: 349
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store

The battery-drain issue inherent with mirrorless is a legitamate concern. The only real way to mitigate that now is to keep more batteries/grips with you in the field, which is costly and cumbersome. However, this prioblem will be engineered away eventually, at least to the point of batteries holding up longer than they do now under mirrorless use. Right now, the BG-E22 grip for the EOS R runs for $490 at B&H. That cost would give many a hobbyist/enthusiast pause.

 

 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,951
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store


@John_SD wrote:

The battery-drain issue inherent with mirrorless is a legitamate concern. The only real way to mitigate that now is to keep more batteries/grips with you in the field, which is costly and cumbersome. However, this prioblem will be engineered away eventually, at least to the point of batteries holding up longer than they do now under mirrorless use. Right now, the BG-E22 grip for the EOS R runs for $490 at B&H. That cost would give many a hobbyist/enthusiast pause.


Especially since they were giving grips away free when I bought my 5D4 last spring.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
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Re: DSLR prices in Canon store

"There are still trade-offs to mirrorless cameras.  ... Canon's Dual-Pixel CMOS AF system works well, I don't think it is as fast as Canon's sports bodies."

 

Totally agree.  It is not.

 

"...  they'll eventually get it right."

 

One would hope so. IMHO, it is not as of today.

 

 

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
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Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store


@TCampbell wrote:

 

There are still trade-offs to mirrorless cameras.  Without a reflex mirror and focusing screen, the sensor is always powered up to be able to frame and focus any shot.  That will translate into more battery power.   While Canon's Dual-Pixel CMOS AF system works well, I don't think it is as fast as Canon's sports bodies.  I'm not sure how it performs for action-photography. 

 


I am guessing that you mean the “the sensor is always powered up” whenever the camera is “awake”.  I think DPAF in the EOS-R represents a third generation of the technology.  I suspect the focusing system is more than capable.  It is lens selection that just may be holding it back from competing with DSLRs and current lenses.

 

The first generation of DFAF was found in cameras like the 7D Mark II and 70D worked quite well in Live View mode.  When used for video, there was a noticeable lag when the AF system would try to track a moving subject.  You could lock on a face.  If the face moved to a different distance, and then stopped, the face would be out of focus during the movement, and then snap into focus a moment after the face stopped.

 

What seems to be the 2nd generation of DPAF is found in the 80D, and 6D Mk II.  When used for video, the noticeable lag when tracking a moving face is arguably absent.  But, this performance is only available with just a few STM zoom lenses.  You will not get this level of facial tracking with other Canon lenses.

Along comes the EOS-R with a new AF system, mount adapters, and a handful of new RF lenses.  These new RF lenses ARE capable of using all of the Movie Servo AF features.  Video must update focus a LOT faster than a DSLR in a continuous shooting mode.  

 

The ability to accurately track moving subjects seems to already be in the EOS-R.  I do not see any lenses that are typically used for action photography out there that can realize the capability that already seems to be built into the camera.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,951
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: DSLR prices in Canon store


@Waddizzle wrote:

@TCampbell wrote:

 

There are still trade-offs to mirrorless cameras.  Without a reflex mirror and focusing screen, the sensor is always powered up to be able to frame and focus any shot.  That will translate into more battery power.   While Canon's Dual-Pixel CMOS AF system works well, I don't think it is as fast as Canon's sports bodies.  I'm not sure how it performs for action-photography. 

 


I am guessing that you mean the “the sensor is always powered up” whenever the camera is “awake”.  I think DPAF in the EOS-R represents a third generation of the technology.  I suspect the focusing system is more than capable.  It is lens selection that just may be holding it back from competing with DSLRs and current lenses.

 

The first generation of DFAF was found in cameras like the 7D Mark II and 70D worked quite well in Live View mode.  When used for video, there was a noticeable lag when the AF system would try to track a moving subject.  You could lock on a face.  If the face moved to a different distance, and then stopped, the face would be out of focus during the movement, and then snap into focus a moment after the face stopped.

 

What seems to be the 2nd generation of DPAF is found in the 80D, and 6D Mk II.  When used for video, the noticeable lag when tracking a moving face is arguably absent.  But, this performance is only available with just a few STM zoom lenses.  You will not get this level of facial tracking with other Canon lenses.

Along comes the EOS-R with a new AF system, mount adapters, and a handful of new RF lenses.  These new RF lenses ARE capable of using all of the Movie Servo AF features.  Video must update focus a LOT faster than a DSLR in a continuous shooting mode.  

 

The ability to accurately track moving subjects seems to already be in the EOS-R.  I do not see any lenses that are typically used for action photography out there that can realize the capability that already seems to be built into the camera.


You've got me a bit confused. What is DFAF? You must mean DPAF? But the 7D2 doesn't hav (any generation of) DPAF, does it?

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
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