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New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎08-02-2018

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

Canon 6D - not only is it a beautiful full-frame sensor, but you could (probably) use your existing Canon lenses and other accessories. Thanks & Regards, Live NetTV
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Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

"...you could (probably) use your existing Canon lenses..."

 

You can't use ef-s lenses on a 6D or 6D Mk II.  She can use her ef 85mil.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with, a lot of other stuff.
New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎08-09-2018

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

[ Edited ]

The SL2 has a Digic 7 processor which will improve your high ISO photos. 

 

But for really clean high ISO nothing beats Full Frame. In addition to the cost of the 6D you would need to buy at least one new EF lens. [link removed per forum guidelines]

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 530
Registered: ‎11-19-2017

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

[ Edited ]

Was a pricepoint ever established? 

 

Everytime I suggest something here, the person posting often says, "thats out of my budget".  The last time was a $298 refurb body directly from Canon. 

 

So, now that we know what kind of pictures the OP is looking to take and how they want to use their camera, can we establish a pricepoint, so we aren't suggesting things that are below or above what the user wants to spend?  I played with a SL2 last week that was installed in a photobooth at one of my clients.  Nice little body, super compact too.  There is value in both platforms..  APS-C and FF and like Ernie mentioned previously, if APS-C is meeting your needs, stick with it. 

Rick
Bay Area - CA
~6D2 (f/w 1.0.4) ~16-35mm f2.8L II, 50 f1.8 STM, 85 prime USM, 70-200 f2.8L IS II ~70-300 USM II ~Sigma 24-70 f2.8 Art (f/w 2.01)
~Sigma 150-600 C + TC1401 1.4x (f/w 1.03) ~Speedlite 430 EX II ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~Windows10 Pro nVidia GPU 1803
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Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

"...  for really clean high ISO nothing beats Full Frame."

 

You can't say this as a blanket statement. You have to specify exactly which models you are comparing. Would you take a 1D and its FF sensor for high ISO or a 7D and its crop sensor ? I know that's extreme but it makes the point.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with, a lot of other stuff.
New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎09-04-2018

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

[ Edited ]

@athman8 wrote:

I dont think I want to switch to mirrorless but could be convinced Would need to understand if  how I can use my current lenses Ive invested in a few good ones that i love redbox showbox apk morpheus


Hi, athman8

 

I'm totally agreed with you.

Super Contributor
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

[ Edited ]

I tend to agree with Rick (Shadowsports) on this one... we have no idea of the OP's budget and that is a critical piece of information.

 

That said, from what I have viewed in this thread a Canon SL2 (offering considerable performance upgrades over the SL1), combined with a 70-200 F4 lens would give a much better reach for the images of individuals on the field.  The other lenses would work as they do with the SL1.  Based on the images the OP has posted those seem to be working out well for her.

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy
New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-11-2018

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

You should only upgrade when you need to. Chances are good you won't wait that long or be that sensible. Smiley Wink

So, basically, to me, it comes down to a few "tipping points" as to when "upgrading" (more realistically you may be sidegrading [e.g., crop to full frame], or expanding [e.g., adding mirrorless to a dSLR rather than replacing it]) has been worth it for me. You will find these reasons not unlike those that decide when it's time to purchase a car. In order of most-sensible to least they are:

  • When your current camera dies and you have nothing to shoot with.

  • [Personal "worth it" metric--your eventual value may vary] When the sum of the new camera body's tier and generation counts above/after my old one is at least 3, and my old body is getting near that 100k click mark.

  • When your frustration level with your current gear makes letting go of money you've set aside more than worth it--and you've done enough research to know how the new gear eliminates (or reduces) the frustration. [May involve discovering previously-unknown/unresearched tradeoffs after purchase that may equalize frustration more than envisioned].

  • When you can find a rockin' deal (usually used or refurb)

  • Just because you **bleep** well want it that bad.

  • here

However. Keep in mind that nearly ANY other piece of gear you can purchase will hold value longer and better than a camera body. Lenses, flashes, and support gear can be used across multiple cameras. They tend not be replaced every 1-3 years, and they also tend to hold value better on the used market. Camera bodies depreciate even while they're still new.

And, in addition, experience and training often count for more when it comes to image quality than any piece of gear. If the goal is to get better photographs, then your money may actually be better spent on airline tickets, or a seminar, or books and training videos than on any camera body.

 

Thanks 

 

 

Valued Contributor
Posts: 305
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

There is a big spread between what is the overall best equipment for acquiring these types of images and what is the best equipment to meet this individual's particular needs.  Full frame sensors of the same generation/technology and with roughly equal pixel counts will have a noise advantage over a crop sensor given their relative pixel size and light gathering capability but a current generation good crop size sensor will easily outperform an earlier full frame in the noise department. I use primarily full frame now but I still have and use my old 1D Mark 2 with its 1.3X sensor and I loved that sensor size for outdoor sports but it doesn't provide the high ISO performance I need for night or indoor games.

 

I do some band and cheerleader shots but primarily soccer and football players where the shutter speed has to remain very high for the fast action.  For what I primarily shoot, at night F2.8 is the "slowest" lens I can reasonably use because in addition to the shutter speed/ISO trade-off I also need the fastest/best AF performance which also comes from using a fast lens.  For shooting the band the requirements are a little less demanding given the somewhat reduced action speed and a 70-200 F4 would do although I would still go for the better F2.8 version if the budget permits and this lens will serve you well into the future. For my usage I would take a used older non IS F2.8 over a new F4 with IS but that is because of my primary focus upon action sports.  The 70-200 F2.8 is a very good and very versatile lens and tomorrow night I will be using a 300 F2.8 on the 1DX 2 with the 70-200 F2.8  on the 1DX which is a pretty good Friday night football combo.  For indoor soccer I am going to experiment with trying the excellent and relatively inexpensive 135 F2 on the second body to see how that works compared to the more versatile zoom.  For what you are shooting, a good current crop sensor body will work fine BUT keep in mind shooting requirements in the future so that whatever you buy now will also suffice for anything you will be doing in the next few years.  In my overall budget if I was dropping back a level on something I would drop back on the body before dropping to a less desirable lens.

 

You want to be as close as possible to what you are shooting in order to take advantage of as much available light as possible and given the often poor and varied field lighting of most public school facilities you need to plan your shots in advance to get the student shots you want when they are in an optimal location.  With the band you can find out the program in advance and be prepared for what they are going to do at each point during the on field part of their performance. You might even attend a practice session (if permitted) so that you can make notes of shots you want to get during the actual show and to figure out your desired placement.  If you want really good photos of the band on the field, at the very least get as far forward in the stands as you can while still maintaining a clear view but if where you are shooting is like most public schools there is a track surrounding the field and you can probably get access to it.  Talk to the school AD or other admin about sharing photos with the band director, yearbook staff, etc. well before the event and this should help you to gain field access.  At the high school level this is usually a pretty simple process especially if done in advance and this "diplomatic immunity" will usually work when visiting other fields once you know the band director.  When playing at other schools I will go in with the coaching staff, AD, or trainer in order to ensure field access; the exception was when we played at a university facility and then I just went through the typical media access process.  If the images you take are of benefit to the school then the relevant administrators will be your ally in helping you to acquire better images AND they will be familiar with the school policies on image usage so that you don't inadvertently provide images to the wrong people.  I wouldn't send a group of images directly to a booster club or other "unofficial" school affiliate without a full understanding of the school policies.  Don't do anything that will damage your field access opportunities.

 

Make sure that you stay aware of your surroundings and stay in the clear.  At many high school fields timing is pretty tight for halftime and you don't want to be between the football players and the field entrance when they get ready to go back on near the end of halftime.  One of the funnier scenes I have witnessed in high school football was a rather out of shape photo guy struggling to run at the head of the players entering the field; he wasn't trying to get photos of them but had been shooting the band and didn't realize he was in their way.  It looked like a bad U.S version of the running of the bulls.

 

Some of the players got a laugh out of my fast footwork at the last football game I shot because an opposing player was determined to make the catch even though he was about 10 yards out of bounds and I did a very fast reverse to clear the area. I was invited to attend the next team practice in order to demonstrate my fast reverse.  This is a reminder that YOU are also being viewed while doing photography so don't trip over the players bench or accidentally tackle an official while capturing images causing embarrassment to YOUR student.  At that game my daughter and several of her fellow soccer players motioned me over to the stands to exchange high fives in recognition of my not getting tackled; I have coached most of them over the years and my daughter has a great sense of humor Smiley Happy

 

Most importantly, resolve to get the most out of whatever equipment you are using so that the gear can fully deliver all that it can provide.  Technology is a tool that is too often used as a crutch; whatever new gear you buy will provide better results compared to your SL1 but make sure that you also take the time to upgrade your technique as necessary and newer gear will open up new possibilities so prepare to do some new and different things with it rather than just focusing upon areas where it has improved over your current body and lens.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M2, 1DX, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video
New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-24-2018

Re: What camera body should I upgrade to (from SL1)?

[ Edited ]

@sienna2506 wrote:

The SL2 has a Digic 7 processor which will improve your high ISO photos. 

 

But for really clean high ISO nothing beats Full Frame. In addition to the cost of the 6D you would need to buy at least one new EF lens.


Thank you for the suggestion. Smiley Happy

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