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Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-13-2019

Video lens for 80D

I have an 80D. The only lens I have is the EFS 18-55 lens it came with. I want to be able to shoot interview videos where the subject is in focus with the background blurry. I also want to shoot b-roll with footage of up close things and the background blurred. 

 

What is the most econimical lens to accomplish this with?

Thank you!

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Posts: 9,220
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Video lens for 80D


@bripow wrote:

I have an 80D. The only lens I have is the EFS 18-55 lens it came with. I want to be able to shoot interview videos where the subject is in focus with the background blurry. I also want to shoot b-roll with footage of up close things and the background blurred. 

 

What is the most econimical lens to accomplish this with?

Thank you!


The secret to being a good videographer with a DSLR is to first learn how to be a good photographer.  Doing so will teach you about different lenses, the exposure triangle, depth of field, and the camera’s focusing and shooting modes.  If you are not familiar with two phrases that are in bold text, then I suggest that you do web searches for articles about them.

Canon says that their EF-S STM zoom lenses, there are about 5 or 6 of them, are ideal for shooting video in Movie AF mode.  But, I do not think that any of those lenses will do all that you seem to be looking for when it comes to blurring the background.

 

I would suggest that you look into Rokinon’s Cinema lenses.  These are fully manual lenses, but they have wide apertures and a “de-clicked” aperture control ring.  Controlling aperture on an auto focusing lens can be awkward because you do not have continuous control. 

 

If you are unfamiliar with apertures, f/stops, and t/stops, then take the time to learn about general photography.  Once you learn the basics of photography, then you can tackle topics like shutter angle.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,794
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Video lens for 80D

The most economical lens wth the largest aperture is the 50mm/f1.8 II.

 

However, as pointed out above by omission, this lens has a fairly loud focus motor so you will want to use it in fixed focus mode.

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Posts: 6,408
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Video lens for 80D

There is a 50mm f/1.8 STM
John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic
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Posts: 793
Registered: ‎12-24-2013

Re: Video lens for 80D

The EF 50mm f/1.8 STM should work great for you, but the STM autofucus on this lens not silent. Use an external mic if you are shooting in a quiet setting.

Mike Sowsun
S110, SL1, 80D, 5D Mk III
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Re: Video lens for 80D


@MikeSowsun wrote:

The EF 50mm f/1.8 STM should work great for you, but the STM autofucus on this lens not silent. Use an external mic if you are shooting in a quiet setting.


I agree.  The STM lens is newer and sharper.  That lens is a “must have” lens for any Canon DSLR photographer on a budget.  It could also be a pretty good starter lens for a DSLR videographer, too.  The basic problem here is that lenses that are good for photography are not always good for videography.

 

The STM prime lenses do tend to be noisier than the STM zoom lenses.  I would only use an STM prime with the lens switch set to MF.  Aperture adjustments tend to be noisy, too, and easily picked up by the built-in microphone.  I would also recommend only using it on a tripod with a subject that was not moving around very much ... like someone who was seated and speaking to the camera.

The combination of 50mm focal length and f/1.8 aperture can produce background blur.  But, how much blur that could be created would depend upon the relative distances from the camera to the subject and the background.  A longer focal length would produce more background blur.  Do a web search for “ depth of field “ to get a better idea of what I am talking about.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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