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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-25-2015

Troubleshooting error 99

I was given a used 30D, by my brother who could not get it to work. The original owner didn't know that it wasn't working but it hadn't been used in some time.
- It took one photo with flash for me, and then nothing. I bought and charged a new battery.
- I get error 99 but the message doesn't always show. I now get no shutter action at all.
- All the display and setting functions appear to work.
- When I turn it on, the red light for the chip blinks once.
- Battery reads 7.61V
- I've cleaned the contacts on the battery and in the battery compartment, using alcohol on a wooden stick.
- I also tried a different card. Didn't seem particularly logical but didn't know what else to try!

Because it did take one photo at one time, I've been guessing that everything potentially works but that something isn't getting the voltage that it needs.
Any suggestions?

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 748
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

[ Edited ]

Remove memory card and lens. Turn your program wheel into M and try to take a picture.

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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-25-2015

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

Thank you Peter.
Still "error 99"though. (I did turn on the function to take photos without the card. I'm a newbie, so am subject to mistakes that an experienced user won't make.)

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 748
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

You can also remove the clock battery.
http://cpn.canon-europe.com/files/education/infobank/batteries/care_of_batteries/caption_005.jpg

Start the camera without any battery, turn it off, install main battery.
Turn on the camera, look into the camera house and the mirror to see what will happen when you release the shutter.

Err99 can be anything, but often it is a problem with the lens contact or the shutter.
---------------------------------------------------------
My Swedish blog

M5, 7D, 6D, D30, 300D, 30D, 1000D IR, EOS DCS 3c, EOS D2000, 16-35/4L IS, 100/2,8 Macro, 70-200/2,8L IS II, 24-105/4L, 85/1,8, 50/1,4, 24/1,4L II, 300/2,8L IS, Helios 58/2

Darktable, RawTherapee, Photomatix, Luminance HDR, GIMP 2.10.6.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,339
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

From my own experiences & tests error 99 is caused by any component that's drawing more power (watts) than it's design limit. The higer draw triggers the error code & shuts things down before something fries. Considering how many electro mechanical parts must move to flip up the mirror & open & close the shutter it's easy to realize wear or dried up lubricant /  or build up of dirt in the lubricant can create a tighter fit which in turn requires greater force to move the component.

That reasoning applies to why replacing a tired battery with a new one may get things working again but even then the error may come back as things stiffen up even more. 

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,987
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Troubleshooting error 99


@cicopo wrote:

From my own experiences & tests error 99 is caused by any component that's drawing more power (watts) than it's design limit. The higer draw triggers the error code & shuts things down before something fries. Considering how many electro mechanical parts must move to flip up the mirror & open & close the shutter it's easy to realize wear or dried up lubricant /  or build up of dirt in the lubricant can create a tighter fit which in turn requires greater force to move the component.

That reasoning applies to why replacing a tired battery with a new one may get things working again but even then the error may come back as things stiffen up even more. 


I guess the theory here is that a new battery might decrease the current draw (which is probably what's being measured, BTW) by operating at closer to its rated voltage than the old one did. (For a given power load, a higher voltage implies a weaker current.) But it doesn't solve the underlying problem, if the latter is that moving parts have gotten gummed up. If the camera is considered worth saving, it should probably be professionally cleaned and lubricated.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,339
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

That's my thinking. As a battery weakens the voltage under load drops forcing whatever device it's powering to draw more amps to get the correct wattage needed to operate. Watts = Amps X volts so as the voltage drops the amps must go up & the amps are what can burn things up quickly.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-25-2015

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

[ Edited ]

Thanks all, for your suggestions so far. The camera did actually work, one time only, with the old battery, but the shutter and mirror haven't moved with the new battery. Or with the old one, either. The cleaning suggestion makes sense to me. Although of course I have no experience in this area.


I did find a couple of how-to's on line to do with shutter replacement and repair attempts at shutter problems. People are saying that an error 99 shutter failure is common on the EOS 30D. (Must be true, I read it on the internet ;-) )
Since it did work once, my instincts lead toward cleaning.

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 766
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

[ Edited ]

Before getting deeper into repairs...

 

Have you tried replacing the date/time battery? It's a small, silver battery in a slide out compartment inside the main batteyr compartment of the camera. Those batteries normally have a service life of roughly 5 years, and are relatively cheap, common and widely avalable, and easy to replace. I don't know that a failed date/time battery would cause an Err 99. Usually the only symptom of one is that the camera loses the date/time setting each time you turn it off and back on. Most Canon I've used will shoot fine, even without a date/time battery installed... so this is only a remote possibility, with the problem you're seeing.

 

Have you tried the camera with a different lens? It could be that the fault lies in the lens... Perhaps there's a short or one of it's components is failing and drawing too much power. There are several electromechanical servos and/or motors in most lenses, driving the aperture, focus and IS, if it's a stabilized lens. There are "flex connectors" in most lenses, too, that can crack with age and use, then short out.

 

You didn't mention what lens is on the camera. I've seen certain older third party lenses cause errors and lock up cameras, too. For example, I have an older Sigma 28-75mm that works fine on Elan 7 and EOS-3 film cameras and 10D DSLR, but the moment it tries to focus will immediatly cause any later model Canon body to lock up and throw off an error code. It's probably an issue with the firmware of the lens. Old Sigma are the most common at fault, but some old Tamron seem to do it too. Sometimes the manufacturer will update the lens... but sometimes not. This particular 28-75 is a cheap version and not possible to fix.

 

Have you inspected the memory card socket? Look closely for bent, broken or otherwise damaged pins down in there. Those can cause short circuits in the camera, too.

 

If none of the above helps, but the camera powers on normally (only goes to Err 99 when the shutter is pressed), you also might try "rebooting" the camera. This is much like rebooting a computer. To do this, first turn the camera off, then remove all the batteries (including the small date/time batt), then turn the camera back on and press the shutter release button once. Nothing will appear to happen. The shutter won't actually fire. This is only being done to drain any remaining power from the circuits.

 

Next turn the camera off, reinstall the batteries, turn it back on and then navigate the menu to the date/time. If you got a proper reboot, those should need to be reset. (Other menu and custom function settings may have reverted to factory defaults, too. So check those before starting to shoot with the camera again.)

 

If able to turn the camera on and access it in the menu, you also might want to update (if needed) or reinstall the firmware. A fresh copy of the firmware can be downloaded from the Canon website. It's not difficult, but does have to be done properly, so very carefully follow the instructions you'll find at the Canon website.

 

Neither a reboot nor an update/reinstall of firmware will solve every problem. But, sometimes they do and they are free to try and easy to do yourself.

 

If all else fails, you'll have to find someone who works on 30D to find out if it's worth repairing. Not sure if the Canon Service Dept. still supports the 30D... But, if not, there are some good third party repairers out there, too. I've heard a lot of positibe things about http://www.discountcamerarepair.com/home.html on another forum. There are likely others.... some of which may be close to you (Discount is in Denver, CO).

 

***********


Alan Myers
San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & EXPOSUREMANAGER 

 

VIP
Posts: 11,239
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Troubleshooting error 99

"Before getting deeper into repairs..."

 

This is good advice.  Do the easy free stuff first.  A new battery.  A different lens.  A new memory card, etc.  If it is a same generation lens from an off-brand maker, thst is a good place to look.  Most, if not all of that era can be problematic in one way or another.  Choose wisely.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
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