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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,298
Registered: ‎03-01-2014

Re: Old Canon DSLR

Ok why are you so loyal to CF cards ? Or need 2 different card types in one camera ?

Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,007
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Old Canon DSLR


@John_ wrote:

Ok why are you so loyal to CF cards ? Or need 2 different card types in one camera ?


In my case, it's because I have a couple dozen of them. And when I bought my wife a T2i, I wasn't happy that it took only SD cards.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
VIP
Posts: 11,315
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Old Canon DSLR

[ Edited ]

John_ wrote:

Ok why are you so loyal to CF cards ? Or need 2 different card types in one camera ?


In my case, it's because I have a couple dozen of them. And when I bought my wife a T2i, I wasn't happy that it took only SD cards.

 

 

I am not sure that is a good reason but it is a reason, I guess.  CF cards are faster and they are more robust.  Granted this difference has dimished in the last little bit of time but never the less it's there. They are easier to handle.

The two slots allow much more flexibility. Different file types or real time backups, etc. In a consumer camera this is not as important.  But in a pro model it is essential.

And with a Canon pro camera you get both.  So you do get the best of either format.  SD or CD. Smiley Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,298
Registered: ‎03-01-2014

Re: Old Canon DSLR

Ok that makes sense I thought the answer would be along those lines including the flexibility in the Pro lines of cameras. I haven't looked at the pro lines of Canon cameras and for me at my level the SX50HS is enough to handle and learn. Do the pro series have the 2 slots ?

Thanks for the reply !

Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,007
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Old Canon DSLR


@John_ wrote:

Ok that makes sense I thought the answer would be along those lines including the flexibility in the Pro lines of cameras. I haven't looked at the pro lines of Canon cameras and for me at my level the SX50HS is enough to handle and learn. Do the pro series have the 2 slots ?

Thanks for the reply !


It's becoming more common, the 7D Mark II being the latest example. But the more conspicuous change is that when a new camera has only one card slot, it's almost certain to be for SD cards.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
VIP
Posts: 11,315
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Old Canon DSLR

"Do the pro series have the 2 slots ?"

 

All Canon's pro level cameras have two slots as do all of Nikon's.  It is almost a given anymore.  I used a Nikon D4 a couple days ago and I believe it had two CF slots????  The 1 series Canon pro all have a CF and a SD.  Except the first one, it had only one CF.

 

I won't comment on other brands as I don't consier them "pro level".

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-17-2013

Re: Old Canon DSLR

I had a 5D and then a 5Dii, and when the 5Diii came out I realized I had a camera that was bin great condition, built like a tank but technologically obsolete. So I decided until the tech curve levels out I would go "entry level" and picked up a 6D. I never had two card slots before and really don't miss a second slot. Not really necessary. So 6D full frame vs 7D crop, I say go 6D. Great great camera for the money.
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,298
Registered: ‎03-01-2014

Re: Old Canon DSLR

As a novice I ask a lot of questions...what do you mean by full frame 6D vs crop 7D ? Does the 7D crop the subject so that what you see through the veiwfinder is not what you get in the photo ?

VIP
Posts: 11,315
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Old Canon DSLR

[ Edited ]

John the term "crop sensor" is totally over used and misleading.  The wonderful 7D and 7D Mk II show you exactly what you get in the view finder or LCD screen.  To the vast majority of camera users the them, to them it is meaningless.

The only practical use is to give you a relationship of the focal length numbers on the lens compared to a 35mm film camera.

 

Some say it has a telephoto benefit.  And some photographers make use of this in sports and birders, etc.  Whether it is actually a benefit is up to debate.  If it is there is also the same loss of wide viewing on the short side.

 

Most consider a 35mm lens as "normal" on a crop camera and a 50mm is more "normal" on a FF body.  There again it is just numbers.

If you want a camera that is more "pro" in build and you want a speedy camera than the 7D series is for you.  If you do like the look that you get from a FF, better low light ability,  but are willing to take a lesser built and slower camera than the 6D is good.

 

Another benefit to the crop series of camera is less expensive lenses as it can use any lens Canon makes where the 6D can not.

 

Remember no camera does it all.  There is no free lunch in photography.  You give to get and you have choices.  Smiley Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-17-2013

Re: Old Canon DSLR

The 6D has a larger sensor than the 7D, that's all it means.  So when considering the image that a lens projects onto the sensor, the 7D (and all other DSLRs with a APS-C sized sensor) "crops" the image.  You still get everything you see through the viewfinder in both cameras.

 

In my experience, the 6D has the advantage over the 7D.  I shoot more for print, and therefore noise is a huge factor.  Theoretically, the 6D has lower noise in higher ISO situations, and this is generally true of full frame cameras because their sesor pixels are less dense.  In the real world, it depends on the situation but I've had better results with the 6D (which has exactly the same sensor as the 5Diii).  

 

Also I prefer full frame because I've found shooting wide angle on an APS-C sensor is very challenging since you run into distortion problems when accomodating the equivalent angle of view (10mm lens vs 16mm on the full frame, 14mm vs 24mm, etc).  You don't have that same problem when shooting telephoto, and the "telephoto advantage" is really a myth, since you would get the same results "cropping" a full frame image (in this case "crop sensor" is appropriate).

 

I honestly see no reason not to go full frame.  It's better all around, and trust me, the 6D is very well bulit.  The ONLY disadvantage it has compared to the 5Diii and 7D is fewer focus zones (not a big deal), slower shooting rate and video features.  If you'll be shooting a lot of pro-level video I wouldn't recommend the 6D.

 

 

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