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New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-17-2019
Accepted Solution

New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

Experts, I need some guidance.

 

I am new to DSLR, with some studying of the relationship between ISO / Aperture and Speed.

 

My vacation pictures are much better taken with cellphone than my new 80D.

 

Appreciate any guidance.

 

Cellphone - 1/1250 sec. f/1.7 4.25mm, ISO 50

 

12019-08-31 (40).jpg

 

80D

1/100 sec. f/7.1 32mm   ISO 100

12019-08-31 (42).jpg

 

VIP
Posts: 8,471
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

I do not know what shooting mode you used on the 80D, but there’s a MAJOR difference in shutter speed.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
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New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-17-2019

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

I used aperture priority and for most of the scenery pictures tried to keep it above 20. I did not override the speed nor EV.
VIP
Posts: 11,491
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

First this is a simple snapshot and P mode would have been fine. 

 

Question, nobody uses Av mode and sets it to f7.1 ?

 

WHy did you use MF?  That is probably your problem for this type shot leave it on AF.  Actually leave it on AF for most shots. 

You can turn your 80D into a cell phone like camera by using the green square full auto mode if you want that type picture.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
VIP
Posts: 11,491
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

"80D

1/100 sec. f/7.1 32mm   ISO 100"

 

The settings of choice for me would have been Av mode set to f8, ISO 200. Letting the 80D select the SS required for a proper exposure. (That's what Av mode does)  Raw file format and post processing in Lightroom. Now if you want a more creative shot, say, the waterfall more flowing, a tripod and a much slower SS would be required.  Wanting to catch in sharpest detail, even droplets of water, a much faster SS, of course.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
VIP
Posts: 8,471
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

I used aperture priority and for most of the scenery pictures tried to keep it above 20. I did not override the speed nor EV.”

 

2320540014832019_05_111002599.jpg

 

Cell phones are good at taking snapshots, which is what these images are.  DSLRs capture photographs, which is what cell phones cannot do 

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Reputable Contributor
Posts: 599
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

[ Edited ]

As Ernie questioned, what is it you were specifically trying to capture with that photo?  The cell phone photo looks very washed out and on the verge of significant overexposure to me (i.e. the striations on the cliff in the upper left of your cell phone photo).

 

From your chosen DSLR settings it appears you wanted extreme depth of field from around 7 meters to infinity in acceptable focus which means nothing is going to "pop" in that composition unless Bigfoot comes kayaking down the falls wearing a florescent yellow bathing suit with sparklers in each hand and at least to me a lot of the potential scenery isn't adding to the scene so if some of the most extreme close in stuff was slightly blurred in order to sharpen the rest of the image I don't think you are losing anything.  Keeping the sensor at its native ISO does result in the greatest dynamic range but I would have chosen a faster shutter speed and lower F stop with most lens unless you are using a tripod because even though you can handhold at those shutter speeds, blur due to camera shake is still very possible at 1/100 even with that wide angle lens. Nothing in the DSLR image looks as sharp as it should since the entire scene should be within acceptable focus given your camera setup.

 

Can you post some other examples of vacation photos you took at a faster shutter speed?  A doubling of shutter speed at these slower speeds greatly reduces the dependence upon the user remaining perfectly frozen. The attached photo was taken 11 years ago in Colorado when I knew that I would be concentrating on keeping my 5 year old daughter entertained and safe instead of putting all my mental focus upon photography so I used a pretty easy setup for most of the hikes on that trip.  The photo is from a 1D Mark II with 24-70MM 2.8 lens (30 mm in the attached photo) @ F7.1, 1/200, ISO 100.  Shot  RAW with very light processing done in DPP. It is certainly nothing special but I chose it because the camera F stop and shutter speed are close to what you used.

 

Your DSLR can and will provide very good output but there is a very worthwhile learning curve so don't become discouraged.  A cellphone camera is like riding the bus where all you have to do is get on and sit back while you have to drive a DSLR but the difference in what you can capture is well worth it.

 

Rodger

 

NZ1W2826.JPG

 

EOS 1DX M2, 1DX, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-17-2019

Re: New to DSLR - poor quality pictures

Thank you all for your feedback.  As I continue reviewing later shots, I remember adjust focus area to more centered.  Thinking it may have weighted too much. 

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