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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎01-27-2018

Need help with setting my 5Ds

Hello All,

 

I bought my 5Ds over a year ago. Disappointingly, I have not had much time to play with it much. I'm about to take a long road trip to Utah and visits all the great national parks. I was wondering if anyone could give me advise on how best to configure my 5Ds so that I can get the most out of it. I would say the bulk of the photos to be taken are landscape. I searched Google for recommended settings, but sadly found none. Instead I've found settings for the 5D mark iv instead. Wondering the same setting applied to the 5Ds?

 

Thank you,

LV

Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,538
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Need help with setting my 5Ds


@limvo05 wrote:

Hello All,

 

Wondering the same setting applied to the 5Ds?

 

Thank you,

LV


For the most part, yes, you can use the same settings.  Be aware that the 5Ds does not have as wide of an ISO range as the 5D4, which is where the differences between the camera bodies will come into play.

Also, be aware that there is no such thing as a one size fits all exposure setting.  As you read the articles about using 5D series cameras, pay more attention to the technique, and less attention to the exact exposure settings.  Learn why the exposures might be set a certain way.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,608
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Need help with setting my 5Ds

For landscapes... 

 

#1 Use a tripod ... even if you think you don't need one and this is because...

 

#2 You'll want to keep the ISO value extremely low (e.g. ISO 100 ideally).  Contrary to popular misconception... ISO is _not_ part of "exposure".  Aperture is.   Shutter speed is.  ISO is not.  ISO is an amplification which is only applied to the image AFTER the shutter has closed and the exposure is complete.  

 

To reduce "noise" in an image, you want good "exposure" (speciifically it's the signal to noise ratio of the image but I'd rather not get into that here).  ISO is boosted BECAUSE the signal wasn't adequate (exposure was too low) and this results in an amplification of both whatever signal the camera sensor collected PLUS whatever noise managed to build up on the sensor.  That's why high ISO images have more noise (the noise was always there... it just wasn't being amplified until you cranked up the ISO dial.)

 

#3  There's rarely a single set subject distance for a landscape because the whole "scene" is the subject.  This means you want a very broad depth of field.  You can get that by using a high aperture value (e.g. f/16 or even f/22).  There's a problem in that light "bends" around edges due to it's wave-like nature and if you use a tiny aperture value (high f-stop) the problem is increased.  This means you can get very slightly soft images due to the diffraction nature of light at very high f-stops and you don't notice this as much at low f-stops.

 

In other words... at say... f/4, you'd probably get extremely low diffraction and the focused part of your subjects would look very sharp... but the depth of field is shallow so much of the image wont be in focus.  If you increase the aperture to make everything in focus (e.g. f/22, f/32) now you have a broad depth of field, but you also have stronger diffraction meaning that even the sharpest stuff isn't as sharp as it was down at f/4.  So we work to find a trade-off we can live with.  Of that's arounf f/16... if you can get away with it... f/11 (but you'll start to lose more depth of field at f/11).

 

When you use this smaller apertures, you'll need to take LONGER exposures (which is why you need the tripod and make sure nothing bumps it).  If the tripod isn't rock solid, then use a remote shutter trigger to take the shot (beucase the act of you simply pressing the shutter button can vibrate the tripod enough to soften the shot).  If you don't have a remote release, use the 2-second delay timer option so the tripod has a chants to damp the vibrations before it takes the shot.

 

#4  Dynamic range during daytime landscapes can be a challenge.  Especially in very early morning or late evening during the "golden hour" when the sun is low, shadows are long, and the lighting is at it's best.  But... a shot that nicely exposes the foreground can end up leaving you with an over-exposed sky.  A shot that nicely exposes the sky can leave you with a very dark foreground.  What to do?

 

There are two solutions...

 

one is to use a "gradient neutral density" filter (e.g. Lee filters makes excellent ones and loads of tutorial videos on how to properly use them).  They darken the sky without darkenging the foreground because half the filter is clear and half is tinted.  

 

Another solution is to use High Dynamic Range photography (HDR).  This is where you take a series of bracketed images.  You set the camera to spot metering mode and you manually meter the darkest areas of the foreground and then manually meter the brightest parts of your sky (a white puffy cloud for example).  This is the range you need.  Now you take several shots where you shift the exposure from the darkest through the lightest (you can shift about 2 stops at a time... you don't need every 1 stop).  Those shots are imported into HDR software (lots of choices) and merged together.

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 74
Registered: ‎09-13-2014

Re: Need help with setting my 5Ds

I have a 5DsR, also prefer landscape photography, assuming you will be utilizing "L" series lenses, wide angle...
My experience has me at f7. 1, ISO 100 /50 shutter speed to obtain desired exposure in live view/with post process preview, slightly darker than the scale indicates for ideal outcome.
One thing is an absolute must... Tripod the 5Ds and DsR due to the extremely high resolution is also an extremely unforgiving camera, I have heard from several that claim the camera is not as good as most of Canon's better models, due to the assumption that high MP's translates to high quality every shot.
Far from it.
Advice on focusing... If there is any part of the shot you want to accentuate use the zoom view function in live view, manually focus on the subject and than exit the zoom and take the shot
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎01-27-2018

Re: Need help with setting my 5Ds

Thank you for the suggestions and comments!

 

Ever since I've switched to this camera, I dare not use it wihout a tripod. Having said that, I am still very cautios of taking photos with this camera in door or portrait of my highly impatient subjects, namely wife and kids, as they would never stay still for more than 10 seconds for me to compose and take the photos LOL. As mentioned in my other posting, I have now acquired a 24-70 2.8 mark ii and 70-200 2.8 IS MK1.  I'll be looking forward to put both to test during my next road trip to Utah and all the great national parks there.

 

Thank you,

LV

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,517
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Need help with setting my 5Ds


@Mitsubishiman wrote:
I have a 5DsR, also prefer landscape photography, assuming you will be utilizing "L" series lenses, wide angle...
My experience has me at f7. 1, ISO 100 /50 shutter speed to obtain desired exposure in live view/with post process preview, slightly darker than the scale indicates for ideal outcome.
One thing is an absolute must... Tripod the 5Ds and DsR due to the extremely high resolution is also an extremely unforgiving camera, I have heard from several that claim the camera is not as good as most of Canon's better models, due to the assumption that high MP's translates to high quality every shot.
Far from it.
Advice on focusing... If there is any part of the shot you want to accentuate use the zoom view function in live view, manually focus on the subject and than exit the zoom and take the shot

I think the point that's being circled around is that depth-of-field quotations are based on underlying assumptions about the maximum resolution of the camera/lens combination. With the 5DS, we may be entering an era in which those assumptions are no longer valid. You may have to be a determined pixel peeper to have it matter, but what's the point of a 50MP camera if you're not going to pixel peep?

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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