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Registered: ‎07-12-2014
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I recently tried a star trace with a 60d.Camera would not load o the SD card.

 
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,807
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: I recently tried a star trace with a 60d.Camera would not load o the SD card.

I'm not entirely sure what you're trying to ask.  Based on your subject, it looks like you are asking for help on inserting an SD card into the camera (and what you plan to photograph with the camera after the card is inserted is not related.)

 

The card should be inserted so the label faces the back of the camera.

 

I have heard of incidents where someone attempted to force a card in the wrong way, broke bits of plastic, and these remained stuck in the slot.

 

When you insert the card and give it the final firm press, it should click in and remain locked in the slot.  Another firm press should release it.

 

If this isn't happening, check to see if there is debris stuck in the slot.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-12-2014

Re: I recently tried a star trace with a 60d.Camera would not load o the SD card.

Tim,
Sorry about the lack of info. The card is in OK because I had just taken a shot of a shorter exposure and it worked fine.
The next exposure was manually focused with a medium aperture setting.
I exposed using a cable release for 30min. on a tripod.
The 60d did not load the image to the card ( which is a SanDisk Ultra 16gb. 10 ). I waited for about 20min and gave up , removing the battery to cancel the operation.
Have I got a fault or have I made an error. I would like to do more of this type of work.
Can you help.
Rob
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎02-28-2013

Re: I recently tried a star trace with a 60d.Camera would not load o the SD card.


@Rarieman wrote:
Tim,
Sorry about the lack of info. The card is in OK because I had just taken a shot of a shorter exposure and it worked fine.
The next exposure was manually focused with a medium aperture setting.
I exposed using a cable release for 30min. on a tripod.
The 60d did not load the image to the card ( which is a SanDisk Ultra 16gb. 10 ). I waited for about 20min and gave up , removing the battery to cancel the operation.
Have I got a fault or have I made an error. I would like to do more of this type of work.
Can you help.
Rob

First thing I would do, would be to take shorter long exposures (5, 10, 15 mins) etc.  Just to see if everything worked.  I would think you would have to anyway, just to get your exposures set.  I'd hate to wait 30 minutes for a shot that was severely overexposed.  Usually star trails are built off of multiple shorter shots anyway.


That said, I'm going to guess that you have Long Exposure Noise Reduction on.  The camera takes a second picture, just as long as the first, with the shutter closed.  It uses this data to remove hot pixels.  It would take another 30 mins to finish the picture.  If you interrupt the camera in the middle of this operation I would assume it deletes the photo.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,807
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: I recently tried a star trace with a 60d.Camera would not load o the SD card.

Ahhh!  This is completely different.  

 

I suspect you'll find, as Skirball points out, that your camera likely has "Long Exposure Noise Reduction" enabled.  This feature kicks in automatically for "long" exposures.  The camera counts the exposure time for long exposures.  When the shot is done, it takes a 2nd exposure but this time it does not open the shutter.  So basically it is taking a photo with the shutter closed merely so that it can allow the "noise" from long exposures to accumulate.  It then uses that to subtract noise from the original image.  

 

This doesn't actually eliminate noise... it merely reduces some of it.  This is because some noise is pattern noise can can reappear in the same spots and some noise is random.  There are a lot of techniques we use when doing astro-imaging to reduce noise which are even better but that's getting off topic.

 

Meanwhile back to your star trace...

 

There's a free application you download called StarStax.  It's one of the most popular programs for doing what you want and it's available on Winows, Mac, and Linux.  

 

If you take one really long exposure, you'll find that your background image of the sky turns to mud and you can't actually see anything.  

 

I'll give you an example.

 

This is a 4 minute exposure using my 60Da.  The object you're having a difficult time seeing in this image is the Dumbbell Nebula (a planetary nebula) -- it's also known as Messieer 27.  

 

But the real reason I'm showing you this is because this is what happens when you take a 4 minute exposure in suburban skies... all that brownish muddy backgrond isn't a defect in the camera... this is actually a very good exposure.  This is what light pollution does.  Had I allowed this exposure to just keep going, the muddy data would just keep building up getting stronger and stronger.

 

Obviously this is not what you want.  Incidentally... if I had traveled far far away from the light pollution of any city or town, I could have captured a much longer exposure without things being so bad.  

 

Dumbbell Light.jpg

 

This next exposure is the same object... but using a lot of imaging processing to clean it up.  Also, I took 16 of these 4 minute exposures as well as 8 dark exosures (exposures using the same exposure settings except leaving the camera covered so all it can capture is darkness and "noise" which the computer can use to help clean up noise inside the image.)  There are some other techniques we use as well.

 

Dumbbell Nebula copy.jpg

 

This is a processed version of the same object.

 

To get good star trails, you'll need:

 

(1) very good dark skies (the darker and farther from urban and suburban light pollution... the better.)

(2) a moonless night (the moon adds an astonishing amount of light pollution and if you take the images with the moon you might as well just be taking them light polluted urban skies)

(3) the remote timer and tripod you already have.

 

Set the camera to take 30 second exposures.

Turn off "long exposure noise reduction" 

Set the camera to take exposures "continuously" (e.g. you'd normally associated this with shooting sports... e.g. capturing action at 5 frames per second, etc.)  except you can actually put the camera into "continuous" shooting mode, set the shutter to 30 seconds, and then just press and lock the shutter button on the remote release and go enjoy some coffee for a few hours.  The camera will take a new image every 30 seconds.

 

When you're done, import all the images into StarStax and let it process and merge the images. 

 

The application will end up creating star trails... but since the exposures were shot in dark skies and relatively short (for night photography) exposure times of just 30 seconds, you should not have a muddy sky background.

 

You can find LOTS of YouTube videos on doing this, btw.

 

Good luck!

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-12-2014

Re: I recently tried a star trace with a 60d.Camera would not load o the SD card.

Thanks for all your feedback,
As both of you have suggested the long exposure noise reduction was set to auto.
Tim thanks for the examples I found them amazing, now with some expert info. I can not wait to try it all out.
many thanks
Rob
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