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Reputable Contributor
Posts: 778
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

[ Edited ]

Since you don't have any filter on the 100-400mm lens, my next suggestion would be to use the 70D's Micro Focus Adjustment feature to fine tune the focus with that lens (and any other lenses you might have, if you feel the need and wish to do so). There are instructions in the camera manual how to do MFA manually. There are various products available to help with the process (some can be homemade). There also are softwares that can largely automate MFA (Reikan FoCal, for example... Google it if interested). I think it very likely this would solve a lot of your sharpness issues once and for all.

 

I agree with previous responses that AI Servo isn't quite as accurate all the time, as One Shot can be. However, whenever you are shooting subjects that are moving... or that might move unexpectedly at any moment... AI Servo may be your only choice. (Live View can be even more accurate than One Shot, but also can only be used in certain situations.)

 

I don't have a 70D. I have a pair of 7D's. But I am fairly sure your 70D has a Custom Function settings much like my 7D's have, since they use very similar AF systems.

 

First, look for an AI Servo focus priority setting C.Fn. On my camera it's a single C.Fn that serves both 1st image (in a burst of shots) and 2nd/subsequent images (in the burst). I've set it to prioritize "focus vs. shutter release". In other words, I accept that the camera may shoot a little slower, may delay the release of the shutter for a fraction of a second to allow time for more accurate focus. I want my shots in focus, even if it slows down my shooting slightly.

 

I think your 70D might use two different C.Fns for this purpose... One for 1st image... The other for 2nd/subsequent shots in the burst. Some of the models newer than my 7D that I've looked into use two different C.Fn in this way. These C.Fn settings only effect AI Servo focus mode... not One Shot.

 

Using AI Servo a lot, you also might want to might want to experiment with Back Button Focusing. This is a very popular sports/action photography technique where you separate the focusing from the shutter release button. BBF allows you to start AF in advance of taking the shot, giving the camera a moment to acquire and track moving subjects. I've provided a link to an older article about BBF... on your 70D (and my 7D's) it's a little different setting it up. Our cameras already have BBF at the "AF On" button on the back. So it's really just a matter of disabling AF at the shutter release button with these camera models. Optionally, it's possible to swap the function of the AF On and "*" or AE Lock button (I use this because the */AE Lock button is larger, more prominent and closer to my thumb... and I focus every shot, while I only occasionally use AE Lock).

 

To set up BBF on your camera, you need to go into the button/control assignment and setup custom function and navigate to the shutter release button. There you set it to the second (middle) choice, which I believe is simply labelled "metering" or "start metering". That's all you really need to do, unless you want to swap the functions of the AF On and * buttons, which is done by reassigning them within that same custom function.

 

Try BBF and see if it helps. It quickly becomes second nature and puts you more in control of when and where the AF focuses. BBF also makes possible to use AI Servo by default (there are some situations or techniques, such as Focus & Recompose, that can't be done in AI Servo without BBF). Many people like and swear by BBF (including me). Some people just don't find it works for them, in which case it's very easy to switch back.

 

Finally, there are also custom functions controlling AI Servo tracking and how it deals with accelerating/decelerating subjects. Suggest you set the AI Servo tracking speed C.Fn to -1 or -2 at least initially. This governs how quick the camera is to jump to another object that might come between you and the subject or if you accidentally let the AF point slip off the subject momentarily.  This C.Fn doesn't effect One Shot mode... only AI Servo. I find that when I'm in practice and better at keeping my AF point right on the subject, I can turn this back to 0 or even to +1 or +2 (which will deal with subject direction changes better). However I usually set this to -1 when I'm out of practice with the cameras and particular types of subjects.  

 

The other C.Fn governs how AI Servo deals with subjects that are changing speeds. My cameras don't have this feature, but I believe yours does. Most people seem to find it works best for them set +1 or +2.

 

I hope these ideas help. One last thing I'd suggest is to set your camera to it's highest frame rate and get in the habit of shooting short bursts of 2, 3 or more shots, to best insure that at least one of them will be as sharp as possible. Better to have several to choose among, than none in focus. The above recommended settings and techniques, as well as the way AI Servo operates also favor using short bursts in this manner.

 

Oh, and while it's certainly commendable to try to "get it all right" in-camera as much as possible, IMO taking the shot is only half the job of making a photograph. Proper post-processing is every bit as important and essential to producing a great final image. I have never made a finished print or even shared an image online that hasn't been through at least some degree of post-processing . It might be only a few seconds to straighten, crop and tweak color and exposure levels (such as in Lightroom... for proofs). Or it might be many minutes or even some hours of work for finishing to a higher level (in Photoshop and similar... for prints and other purposes). By design, more advanced cameras (such as 70D vs T2i) do less image finishing in-camera, becuase more experienced users tend to do at least some post-processing. Back in the days of film, post-processing was typically done for us by our film lab. Today with digital, for all practical purposes we each are now our own "film lab".

 

***********

 

Alan Myers
San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & EXPOSUREMANAGER 

 

 

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 762
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

[ Edited ]

About the focus points. This is from the 6D, but it is similar.

http://thenewcamera.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Canon-6D-viewfinder-image.jpg

The point you see in the viewfinder is smaller than the real one. You have the 7D here: http://media.the-digital-picture.com/Images/Other/Canon-EOS-7D/Canon-EOS-7D-AF-Point-Coverage.gif

VIP
Posts: 11,622
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

I really like this advise ..........

 

"... set your camera to it's highest frame rate and get in the habit of shooting short bursts of 2, 3 or more shots, to best insure that at least one of them will be as sharp as possible."

 

And this ...

 

"Proper post-processing is every bit as important and essential to producing a great final image."

Smiley Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Highlighted
New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-13-2016

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

I'm having a similar issue with my camera. ... Curious, using the bird photo as an example, what if you wanted the entire photo to be sharp, (the bird and the background). What would you change in settings? ... I tend to shoot everything in Auto, I'm still learning. Normally I take pictures of my kids, but even when they are standing still it seems like something is out of focus. I took a picture the other day of a bunch of girls at a table for a birthday party, the girls in front were in focus and the girls in back were very blurry. I took numerous pictures trying to capture the best shot, but someone was always blurry. 

VIP
Posts: 11,622
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

To virtually guarantee you don't get "great" photos is, use the green square fully auto mode.  That is a compromise for exposure and not for what you intend.

Saying that, all cameras have a limit as to what is possible. Some of the time it is limited by simply the lens you use. Other times for lack of light and so on, etc.

Generally speaking you want a high f-number for a large amount, DOF, of the picture to be in focus. Example f11 or f16.  Again this may be beyond the limit of the camera/lens combo you have.  For instance inside an average family living room, may not have sufficient ligth to warrant f16 or even f11.  In that case you must supply the required amount of light.  It might be a flash for instance.

At any rate, you must learn the other more controllable modes of your camera and get off the green square full auto setting.

 

Getting and learning a good post editor is another way to get you the great photos you seek.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎06-28-2013

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

 I rarely stop by this forum, or any other for that matter, so I feel a little out of place when I do post, what with the plethora of fine photographers located here. I've read most of the advice being given to help this gentleman and it's all good, however, as to the two original photos used as an example of soft focus the first thing I noticed is that the 70D birds eye is turned slightly away from the camera and is in the shade where as the first shot is taken in complete sunshine and the birds eye is considerably larger than the second bird. As mentioned several times: hard to make a comparison. I have to agree with "post processing". One of the best photography tools out there. One more quick observation: that's a big, heavy lens that's being used. I have found that as I get older I simply cannot hold my rig as steady as I could some years ago. Tripod time?

 

tinwhistle

New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-14-2017

Re: I am having issues wit the sharpness of my 70D. I have yet to be able to take a truly sharp phot

I totally agree. I bought this camera last year and still go back to my Rebel Xsi because I get better photos out of it. 

I feel like I have never gotten a clear photo out of this camera ever. 

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