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Registered: ‎01-22-2021

How does the RF24-105 F4L Balance with an RP?

Hi all, would just like some opinions on how well the RF24-105 F4L balances with the RP.

I have smallish hands so the size of the RP body itself does not really seem to be a problem. I have been reading some early reports on other forums that the RP with this lens is a little front heavy, and Im not sure if that will be an issue.

The RP size seems just right, with me being familiar with the M50 body, but Im not sure how the bigger and heftier lens will feel. (I have adapted some heavy and longer EFs glass like the Sigma 17-50 2.8, and the EFs 55-250 without real handling problems)

This lens seems to be what id like in a walkaround travel lens with an f1.8 prime for lower light...

Any experiences with these would be helpful and appreciated.

Thanks

Valued Contributor
Posts: 343
Registered: ‎02-23-2020

Re: How does the RF24-105 F4L Balance with an RP?

There's nothing better than experiencing lenses first hand.  So see if a local camera shop has one you could try.  Or, rent one.

 

I rented the EF 70-200 f/2.8 L III a while back and that quickly helped me to remove that option.  Way too heavy for my liking.

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Ricky

EOS 5D IV, 50mm f/1.2L, 135mm f/2L, 600EX-RT (x6), ST-E3-RT, Vixia HF G50
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Posts: 856
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: How does the RF24-105 F4L Balance with an RP?

[ Edited ]

@Karpenter1 wrote:

Hi all, would just like some opinions on how well the RF24-105 F4L balances with the RP.

I have smallish hands so the size of the RP body itself does not really seem to be a problem. I have been reading some early reports on other forums that the RP with this lens is a little front heavy, and Im not sure if that will be an issue.

The RP size seems just right, with me being familiar with the M50 body, but Im not sure how the bigger and heftier lens will feel. (I have adapted some heavy and longer EFs glass like the Sigma 17-50 2.8, and the EFs 55-250 without real handling problems)

This lens seems to be what id like in a walkaround travel lens with an f1.8 prime for lower light...

Any experiences with these would be helpful and appreciated.

Thanks


It looks like you have a fair amount of experience with some different camera configurations. Smiley Happy  That said, much depends on how you camera is held. I have found that a lot of people (and I have no idea if you are one), coming from cell phones, hold the camera with two hands on the body and extend their arms out to focus etc. using the rear screen.  That might work for a cell phone or a camera with a small, short-focal length and light lens, but cameras (and lenses) much heavier than that create a lot of torque and instability.

 

Best practice, espeically for using a ILC, says that hand-held, one should support the camera with the left hand under the lens, with the heel of the palm against, or forward of the under-front of the camera body.  That means that the weight of the camera is balanced with the centre of gravity around the left hand rather than fore or aft of that.  That should remove the sense of imbalance and after that it's just down to weight - thus resolving your issue.

 

By tucking the left elbow into the chest, a secure bracket is created and by holding the camera to the eye and using the VF or EVF, more stability is achieved.  Finally, by carefully controlling one's breathing when taking the shot, a lot of stability is achieved.  The right hand should thus be free to operate the controls without providing any support - see the image below.

 

How_to_hold_a_camera.jpg

 

That said, I personally add a battery grip to all of my camera bodies, both for the extra capacity (desireable with the high drain of the R series), the dual controls for portrait orientation, and the added weight at the back for some rebalancing of heavier lenses - some of the lenses I shoot with are over 2kg (4.5lb).

 

On a tripod that is a different matter, as the mount is located at the base of the camera body, but it should be designed to take that stress.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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