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Valued Contributor
Posts: 423
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: Help - new photographer!

Wadizzle,

 

EXCELLENT point on the choice of metering!

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M2, 1DX, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,169
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Help - new photographer!

While there may be a metering problem, modern cameras are pretty amazing. My circus shots came out very well metered. Certainly good enough for raw.

 

IMG_5268.jpg

Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,766
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Help - new photographer!

[ Edited ]

@kvbarkley wrote:

While there may be a metering problem, modern cameras are pretty amazing. My circus shots came out very well metered. Certainly good enough for raw.

 

 


For your scene, standard Evaluative Metering was probably good enough.  Your background is not anywhere near as dark as the OP’s background in some of the sample shots.  In fact, metering a wel lit subject against a very dark background is a recognized metering challenge.

 

1FD9545D-6387-412D-8B77-F8BD87ECCE63.jpeg

 

That is a screenshot from the Instruction Manual of a C100 Cinema Camera.  The camera has a special metering called “Spotlight”, which is more or less the exact opposite of a backlit scene.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎03-05-2019

Re: Help - new photographer!

Unfortunately, I am dealing with both spotlight scenes and other backlit scenes. My camera does not have a spotlight mode - what metering would you suggest for those spot light scenes? The shots I'm taking of a kid in a spotlight with dark background are blowing out bigtime. 

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 679
Registered: ‎12-24-2013

Re: Help - new photographer!

You need to shoot manual with a brightly lit subject and black background.  Spot metering will help, but those king of lighting conditions are very challenging. 

 

The problem is is the huge variation between the brightly lit subject and the black background. Moving the camera just slightly can cause big variations in brightness and mess up any auto exposure. 

Mike Sowsun
S110, SL1, 80D, 5D Mk III
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Posts: 10,816
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Help - new photographer!

[ Edited ]

" I am dealing with both spotlight scenes and other backlit scenes."

 

The choice of "modes" will always help.  Choosing the right one is not a thing that any of these guys here and I can tell you specifically. Actually exact settings at all!  WHat I suggested you do will get you close but you still need to make 'tweaks' to that.  Now add the fact, and every photographer reaches this point at some time or another is, photographic gear has limits. One of those limits is DR or dynamic range. If the backlight or spotlight exceeds this it is going to be very difficult to impossible to get a perfect shot. Use the settings I suggested as a starting point. Then make some adjustments if need be. I.E. change the ISO setting or perhaps aperture, etc.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with less and less other stuff.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,766
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Help - new photographer!


@crowgirl1 wrote:

Unfortunately, I am dealing with both spotlight scenes and other backlit scenes. My camera does not have a spotlight mode - what metering would you suggest for those spot light scenes? The shots I'm taking of a kid in a spotlight with dark background are blowing out bigtime. 


I would experiment with partial metering or center weighted metering.  This Canon 101 video may help you to understand how metering works, and the different metering modes.  I would save a special metering mode as a Custom Shooting Mode.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wKA92h0MfIE#

Hope this helps.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,766
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Help - new photographer!


@crowgirl1 wrote:

Unfortunately, I am dealing with both spotlight scenes and other backlit scenes. My camera does not have a spotlight mode - what metering would you suggest for those spot light scenes? The shots I'm taking of a kid in a spotlight with dark background are blowing out bigtime. 


Another solution occurred to me.  Use the previous suggestion to shoot in Av mode.  Take a couple of initial shots, and look at the histogram on the rear of the camera.  You can dial in AEC, Automatic Exposure Compensation, to correct the exposure when the histogram shows over/under exposures.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,855
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Help - new photographer!

Crowgirl, you're obviously doing this in rehearsals and with the approval of The Authorities, so this should allow you to play some games with the lighting. If you need more light in the background, have them brighten it while you're photographing the scene. A camera doesn't see what people see, and you sometimes have to cheat. The fact that the actual performance will use different lighting is irrelevant.

 

When I worked for a city government and was photographing, say, a lecture or awards ceremony that wasn't being televised, I'd often ask to have the TV lights turned on anyway, because it improved the lighting to my advantage. You should be able to apply the same principle.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
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