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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎06-06-2013
Accepted Solution

First DSLR for filming

Hey everyone,

 

I am looking for a DSLR for filming purposes. I have been recently watching reviews and video footages to see which is the best for me. Obviously a 5d mark II or III would be the best choice but unfrtunately I cannot afford it.

 

I have also checked the 60D which looks amazing because of the lcd screen which is adjustable but it has lower image quality, the 6D which also has a full frame sensor as the 5D. But the 60D is cheaper.

 

Which one do you suggest?

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎02-28-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

Are you already invest in Canon glass?  If not, I’d look outside of Canon (the Panasonic GH2 has a bit of a cult following), or if you only want it for video a dedicated video device.  I don’t shoot video, but from the guys I know that do Canon dSLR doesn’t come with high regards.

 

But, if you do want a dSLR that shoots video:  I think the main debate is usually between the 600D and 650D.  The 600D has 3X crop, and the 650D has autofocus while shooting.  There are many debates of which is better (assuming the 600D has Magic Lantern).   Last I heard the 7D didn’t have ML, but that may have changed.  If you’re going to shoot video, you should probably intend on using ML.

 

The 6D has a lot of moiré.  Again, not from personal experience but from the discussions.  Not sure if that’s worth the low light sensitivity.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎06-06-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

I'd rather stick with canon.

New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

[ Edited ]

Actually, historically speaking when it comes to DSLR Filmmaking Canon got it right straight away. In addition, the 7d has had magic lantern firmware available since 2009 [Mod note- edited to remove link]. Now granted technology is always changing but I am big fan of the 7d as well as 650d. If you head over to Vimeo and search by the model number of your interest you will be able to find alot of quality work completed via Canon DSLRs. It might be prudent to also not that Canon is the only company that will continue to support the hardware warranty even with the usage of Magic Lantern firmware http://petapixel.com/2013/05/27/will-custom-firmware-void-my-warranty-canon-nikon-and-panasonic-resp... That is not the case wtih some other camera manufacturers.

 

Mod note - If the Factory Service Center determines that a third party firmware is the cause of the malfunction, the repair would not be considered as an "in warranty" repair, however, the remainder of the hardware warranty would remain intact.  We do not support third party firmware.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

I've used the 5D Mark II, 5D Mark III, and T3i for professional productions. I've not used the 60D or 7D.  But, to start out, you can't go wrong with the T3i or T5i. The video is more than acceptable, and most viewers can't really tell the difference between the 5D Mark II and the T5i, not to mention the 60D. Now, the 5D Mark III is in another category altogether! The 5D Mark III is by far the best for DSLR video, but it's a little pricey for your first camera.

 

I would acquire the T5i (don't remember the non-US model number) and some good lenses. You can spend the difference between the T5i and 60D or 7D on some good non-S lenses that you can use as you upgrade bodies in the future. Spend your money on lenses first, then bodies.  Your lenses will serve you much longer than your bodies!

 

Once you know that a DSLR meets your shooting requirements (they're still-frame cameras first, and video cameras second), you can either sell your T5i or use it as a backup/second camera when you buy a 5D Mark III or other Canon DSLR. Keep in mind that there are major limitations with all DSLRs when it comes to video, and make sure you can live with those limitations.

 

The major benefit for video of the T5i is the fold-out LCD screen. You will be shooting from different angles (high or low), and you can adjust the screen to compose your shot. Otherwise, you'll need an external monitor, rig, or other relatively expensive gear to adequately compose your shots.

 

A previous poster mentioned the Panasonic GH3, and that is a great camera for video, but the product line is not as broad or deep as Canon's. I think your decision to say with the Canon product line is good. Good luck in your shooting!

 

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

When buying your camera, make sure to check around for lens deals. I was able to pick up the 6D and a 70-300mm lens for only an additional $350, normally $800. I was able to get everything under $2,500. I only purchased the body (because the store didn't have the one with the kit lens). I just picked up a 40mm at the same store using "points" I had received for the camera purchase, so really you can save money if you shop around. BTW, I managed to nab one of the two remaining Zoom H4n's at this very store for only $220, which normally goes for about $50 more. I'm not a big shopper, so I am grateful I managed these deals.
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎06-06-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

[ Edited ]

Thank you for your replies.

 

c1video:

 

Now if I am correct the T5i is the 700D and the T3i is the 600D

 

Now i've been trhough the prices and I figured that the T5i is the cheapest from all. What makes the difference then between a T5i or a T3i and a 5d mark II? The prcies are so different however you said there's not that much of a  difference between the image quality.

 

I am a bit confused right now because I encountered so many cameras. Th 600D/T3i the 60D the 6D the 5D the 7D the 700D/T5i. And the prices are so different. What I want is a decent image quality with very low noise (i know it also depends on the lens). The full frame sensor seems to be an imortant thing when talking about image quality and the adjustable lcd screen is also a good point. But what about the others? What makes one better than the other?

 

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

[ Edited ]

Honestly, it really depends on what you intend to do with the camera. If you're going to be shooting in low-light situations, then you're going to want to consider the ISO readings. Although the T5i is a great pre-pro camera, it isn't as good in low light as say a 6D or 5D Mark III. The price variance has to do with things that are loaded into the camera. For instance, the 6D is pretty good in low-light situations, but the 5D Mark III is tons better and handles moiré issues and rolling shutter (that jello effect when you move the camera too fast) slightly better.

What you really need to do is go on Amazon or B&H or any other camera on-line store and start reading all of the reviews for the different types of cameras you're interested in getting. Read both good and bad reviews to give you insight on other people's experiences. They have pretty much done all the homework for you. After that, make a decision of what to buy based on your needs. This was how I came to a decision. It was difficult, but bought the right camera for my current needs.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

[ Edited ]

The full-frame sensor in the 6D and 5D allow better wide-angle coverage, as there is no crop factor.  A 50mm lens on a crop-factor camera such as the 60D or 7D or T3i/T5i is equivalent to an 80mm lens on a full-frame camera. That's good if you want to zoom, bad if you want wide angle shots.  Also, the full-frame sensor gives you less depth of field for a given lens at a give aperture, so you can separate the focus point from the background.

 

The 5D Mark II provides good noise characteristics up to ISO 3200, the 5D Mark III looks good up to ISO 6400. Generally, the newer the camera, the better the noise-handling capability, as the manufacturers continue to improve low-noise capability. I think you could comfortably shoot with a T5i at 3200.  

 

My original recommendation, based on your situation and wanting your first DLSR for video, was the T5i.  It has better overall performance than the T3i in low light with a given lens and saves you lots of money.  So, my recommendation is the T5i with some good lenses. Buy some good lenses with your savings!  Good lenses on a mediocre body is better than bad lenses on a good body, and with lenses, you get what you pay for, and Canon lenses retain their value.

 

The flip-out screen is a great feature for your first DLSR. It gives you a lot of flexibility at a low cost. The 60D has a flipout screen but it is quite old now and I wouldn't recommend it, and the T5i is much better.

 

Here are some reputable vendor ballpark prices for bodies: 60D, $700; T5i, $850; 7D, $1300; 6D, $1900; 5DIII, $3300.

 

You can figure out your budget. Leave out the 60D.  The flip out screen is valuable for video and it's probably comparable in quality nowadays to the older 7D (same 1.6 crop factor APS-C sensor) but newer Digic processor---probably better in low light. The 6D is the middle ground. New sensor, full-frame, probably better overall image quality than T5i, but $1050 more!  Like I said, you may decide that shooting video with a DSLR is not for you after a while. I don't think you want to get  stuck with an expensive camera that doesn't meet your shooting needs. But you will definitely appreciate the fold-out LCD.

 

Hope this helps,

 

 

 

 

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: First DSLR for filming

Rolling shutter is about the same for all of the CMOS chip cameras including the Canon videocameras.

 

However, the moire is noticeably less on the 5DIII than the 6D!  It's not as sharp overall, but that can be easily addressed in post processing with a little sharpening.  

 

Do a YouTube search on "Phillip Bloom," whom I respect very much. He did a fairly comprehensive comparison of the 5DIII with the Nikon D800. Also, you can search on "Dave Dougdale" on Youtube for a comparision of the 5DIII and the 60D.  For Dougdale's review, disregard his "low-light test" at the end of the video. He used center-point focus on both cameras and found the 5DIII couldn't focus in low light whereas the 6D could.  That's because the 5DIII has a totally new autofocus system that is shared with the 1D-X and he should have used focus-assist on the 5DIII.  Then...no comparison. The 5DIII is awesome autofocus.

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