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mjw
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-13-2019
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EOS M5 w/18-150mm

I'm considering buying the EOS 5 camera. So far very impressed wioth info availabl;e on the internet. Are there any new users and what are the experiences. Opinions and experience of others will help me to make decision.

Thanks

Valued Contributor
Posts: 443
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: EOS M5 w/18-150mm

[ Edited ]

It helps if you tell us some information about how it will be used.  Each of us is likely to have their own user profile, so suitability is a personal thing.

1. What will you capture with it - general walk-around photography,  shooting wildlife, portraiture, travel etc.

2. What will you produce with it - images for the web, on-screen or media, small prints or large prints.  There is a massive difference between investment for web publishing and producing good large scale prints.

 

For what it's worth I have the M5 with the 11-22, 18-55, 18-150, and 55-200 lenses.  I got it as a lightweight alternative to my DSLRs when I had injured my knee and could not walk far with a DSLR camera and some hefty lenses.  I always carry a camera with me, so it's purpose was as a general walk-around unit that didn't get in the way and I could carry.

 

As far as the M5 body goes, its performance is roughly equivalent to that of the 80D, which is pretty decent.  My only real issue with it is that the LCD flips down rather than to the side (something they fixed in the later, but lower-end M50).   The camera is capable and has taken great shots for me with the 18-150 and the 55-200 lenses attached.  The lenses are not particularly fast, but for me that is not an issue as I do most of my photography outdoors in decent light. As with all crop sensors, the Field of View: i.e. what the sensor captures from the lens is different from that printed on the lens itself, which is given for the FoV of a FF sensor.  Thus the sensor will capture from the 18-150 an Equivalent FoV of 29-240mm if you were using a FF camera. Note the lens does not change its physical characteristics in any way, but the sensor just doesn't see everything the lens can send it.

 

For me the biggest benefits are a very small form factor with an APS-C sensor and interchangeable lenses.   Rumour has it that there will be an M5 MkII at some stage, but until I see something physical, it's vapourware.

 

I should note that I don't do video to any serious degree, if you want more focus on that side of things I would suggest looking at the M50, which is apparently more inclined in that direction.

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy
mjw
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-13-2019

Re: EOS M5 w/18-150mm

Thank you
It was very helpful
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎07-18-2018

Re: EOS M5 w/18-150mm

Hi -

  I have an M5 on the way via eBay.  Can you send me some of the on-line sources of info you mentioned.  I am anxious to get up to speed.

 

Thanks

Valued Contributor
Posts: 443
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: EOS M5 w/18-150mm


@mangurian wrote:

Hi -

  I have an M5 on the way via eBay.  Can you send me some of the on-line sources of info you mentioned.  I am anxious to get up to speed.

 

Thanks


I am not sure this was addressed to me but I will offer what I can for what it's worth.  Obviously I have no idea of your experience - I tried to find something on your profile.  So if I am undershooting your experience please don't feel offended.

 

1.  You need to have under your belt the 'holy trinity' of exposure: the relationship between Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO.  There are lots of places where you learn about these, but my personal favourite is via lynda.com, which you may have access to free of charge via your library.

 

2.  Read  your manual - we get a lot of questions on the forum that are easily answered by reading the documentation that came with the camera.  THEN if you still have questions we can move on from there.  If you want extra training on the camera itself, I suggest trying Youtube videos:

Canon offers Camera Assist Videos for the M5:

https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/learn/education/topics/article/2018/August/Canon-E...

Tony Northrop offers a tutorial as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQnd7S0bg4U

 

3. Understand the characteristics of a crop sensor compared to a Full Frame unit.  You can use  lynda.com to do so, but simply put...  

 

A lens field of view is, by convention, measured by its focal length.  The longer the FL the greater the magnification and narrower the range of what is sees - its Field of View.  The measurement of focal length is constant for all lenses i.e. if it says 100mm on the lens that is what the lens will deliver, but that is not necessarily what the sensor will capture.  A smaller sensor captures less of what the lens can deliver, giving a Field of View that is narrower - which is the same characteristic of that a longer focal length lens would deliver to a full-frame sensor. 

 

Thus to differentiate between what the lens can deliver and what the sensor captures we use the term Equivalence.  Essentially, to establish the FoV that a sensor will capture from a lens, we mulitply the focal length (remember that does not physically change) by the crop factor to get a measure of a relative FoV in Focal Length terms.  So, since the crop factor of a Canon APS-C sensor is 1.6, we would mulitply the actual FL of the lens by 1.6 to get what the sensor will actually see

 

What that means is that at the wide angle, crop sensors will not deliver as wide a FoV as the lens suggest: e.g. a 10mm lens on a 5D (a Full Frame body) will deliver a FoV of 10mm, but on an APS-C body like a Rebel or M5, the FoV captured from that 10mm lens will be that Equivalent to that of a 16mm lens on the 5D.  Or to apply the corollary of that, to get the 10mm field of view you might expect on a 5D you would need to get a 6mm lens (the reciprocal of 1.6).   At the other end of the spectrum, i.e. for telephoto work it can actually be an advantage - so a 200mm lens on the FF will deliver a FoV value of 200mm, but on the crop sensor the captured FoV is Equivalent to 320mm. 

 

This is simply cropping - there is no extra magnification as such, but one advantage at the telephoto end is that where the sensors have the same total pixel capacity, you will get more pixels assigned to the cropped image - that is one reason wildlife photographers like crop bodies - that, and they are usually much cheaper.  Of course if you were to print the image from a full frame sensor to the same size as that from a crop sensor it will APPEAR that they image is magnified, but in fact it was cropped by the sensor and printed at the same size.

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy
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