Canon Community Canon Community
 


Reply
Highlighted
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,802
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

From page ~400 of the manual:

Untitled.jpg

 

This is arguably better for your purposes than knowing the focus distance.

Your lenses should provide the distance info.

Highlighted
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 86
Registered: ‎11-14-2018

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

Great camara and great lens.  When I try to shoot wildlife I use the top wheel to select the focus point but often have to anticipate.  I pick the wildlife or an item at the same distance and lock the lens focus (hold at half press) and then compose/try to catch the animal befor pressing the rest of the way.  Usually works.

Highlighted
VIP
Posts: 9,257
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject


@kvbarkley wrote:

@Sadie1 wrote:

Thank you - on my laptop - DPP does not work well - it keeps crashing.     Do you know where I can find the list of lenses that provide that info?


I don't think Canon provides that info.


Macro lenses.  It is my understanding that only ertain combinations of professional grade bodies and professional macro lenses provide that info in DPP.  There is a slider that indicates focus distance in DPP.

I do not think any of the super telephoto lenses report distance in DPP.  The DoF can become too great to give a precise distance to the focused subject.  Even the Lightroom plugin I have only reports a range of distances.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
Highlighted
VIP
Posts: 9,257
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject


@Sadie1 wrote:

Thank you.    I think I should hit the resolve button.     I don't think I presented my question clearly.     If I'm looking at a picture on the laptop and I'm not pleased with the sharpness of the subject I was focusing on - it would be nice to know approximately how many feet I was from the subject.

When out shooting wildlife - there are birds I think I can get a decent shot and they do not come out.     I am not a good judge of distance so I was hoping there was an easy way of finding the the focus distance.     I am using the Canon 100-400 L II lens.    Must be I would need the larger lense to get that information displayed in the metadata.

 

Thank you

 

 

 


The EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM has a well earned reputation for being razor sharp.  But, there is a learning curve associated with using super telephoto lenses.  You have to learn how to adjust the camera, and how to adjust the lens.

 

The lens has a focusing distance switch, which I normally leave set to “3m to Infinity”.  This setting makes a world of difference when focusing on subjects further than 10 feet away, which is nearly everything I aiming at with the lens.

The lens also has different IS, Image Stabilization, modes.  Use Mode 1 for focusing on a stationary subject when shooting handheld.  Use Mode 2 when you are panning to track a subject, either horizontally or vertically.  Mode 3 disables IS until you press the shutter.  I would stick to Modes 1 or 2 if you are just starting out.  I almost never use Mode 3, BTW.

 

 

Camera settings are far more complicated.  Every shooting scenario is different, but there are certain strategies that you may want to follow.  Strive for a high shutter speed, always, when shooting most types of action photography.  Sometimes you want to capture motion blur, but for most wildlife you want the fastest shutter that is practical.  I would strive to use 1/800, or faster.  I typically try to shoot with the lens at 1/1600, or faster.

 

Unlike many lenses, you can shoot wide open with the lens and capture razor sharp images.  This can help gain a full stop in our shutter speed.  Dial in the maximum aperture, and go for it.  This is also where the camera shooting mode can make a difference.  Should you Av, Tv, or M?  I prefer to have complete control of aperture and shutter speed, so I shoot in Manual with ISO set to Auto.

 

Setting exposure is the easy part.  Selecting the best AF focusing mode, and drive mode, can make.a big difference.  And, then there is the question of AF point selection.  Do you select it, or should you let the camera select it?

 

My rule of thumb says when using One Shot focusing, then use Single Shot drive mode.  When using AI Servo focusing mode, then use Continuous Shooting drive mode.  I like to use the former for stationary subjects, like a bird on a tree branch.  I like to use the latter for birds in flight.

 

https://cpn.canon-europe.com/files/product/cameras/eos_5d_mark_iii/AF_guide_EOS5D_MarkIII_eng_Januar...

 

As far as setting up AF points and AF tracking settings, you really should become familiar with the AF Shooting Guide.  Generally, I will use the center AF point for One Shot mode.  AI Servo mode is more complicated because of the sophisticated  tracking features, and AF points display modes.  

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
Highlighted
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-18-2018

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

Thank you.    I have that set up on my 5D Mark iii - but on the Mark IV - "Disable Display" is showing off and when I hit the set button to change it - it does not give me the option.   

Highlighted
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-18-2018

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

Thank you - I am fairly new to wildlife photography and still struggle with it when the lighting is bad.     I have not tried focus lock yet.    Thanks

 

Highlighted
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-18-2018

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

Thank you so much for the link and your reply with good information.    I have read many articles and watched YouTube video's.    I will admit the AF tracking system has me still trying to figure it out.    I will read the link you provided and hopefully get  to where it makes sense to me.     If the lighting is good - the shots are coming out pretty good.     But when the weather is very cloudy and gray - the subjects are fuzzy and grainy.     Thankfully the 5D IV is much better than my 5D iii in the grain/noise.

Thank you

 

Highlighted
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-18-2018

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

Quick question - I have both the 5D Mark III and Mark IV.    When I was setting up the AF settings for the IV - there seemed to be a few different options.     The guidebook you provide the link for - is there one available for the Mark IV or are they the same?    Thank you

Highlighted
VIP
Posts: 9,257
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject


@Sadie1 wrote:

Quick question - I have both the 5D Mark III and Mark IV.    When I was setting up the AF settings for the IV - there seemed to be a few different options.     The guidebook you provide the link for - is there one available for the Mark IV or are they the same?    Thank you


I do not know.  There is one for the 7D2 and the 1Dx II, both of which have AF systems that are similar to the 5D4.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
Highlighted
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-18-2018

Re: Distance from end of lens to subject

Thank you

 

powered by Lithium

LIKE US on Facebook FOLLOW US on Twitter WATCH US on YouTube CONNECT WITH US on Linkedin WATCH US on Vimeo FOLLOW US on Instagram SHOP CANON at the Canon Online Store
© Canon U.S.A., Inc.   |    Terms of Use   |    Privacy Statement