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Super Contributor
Posts: 487
Registered: ‎03-17-2015

Re: DSLR 101

That's why I'm not going to get the monitor for my laptop."

 

Not trying to tell you what to do.  If you are going to buy a new desktop and monitor why don'tyou get the monitor as soon as you can.  Use it on the laptop until you get the new desktop?  You will need it anyway?  Yes, no?

Even if it doesn't work well, you would be out nothing

 

I'll get it, but for my desktop. it'llwork just fine.  I listed the specs of the monitor I have with it in the privious post.  Yes...you're right.

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Super Contributor
Posts: 487
Registered: ‎03-17-2015

Re: DSLR 101

BTW..................Ok, I'll try the laptop but i told you I'm crammped for space on my Pc desk.  As of now there's no room I can comfortably use it with the laptop.  If I use it on the laptop I'll have to do a magic trick   LOL

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VIP
Posts: 12,704
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DSLR 101

OK, it sounds like you have a plan.  I am going to lay low for now and let you digest DPP.  Bob from Boston will be far more help on DPP than I.

In the future when you feel you are ready for LR or PS, let me know.  Remember you can not buy PS any longer.  You must rent it.

The Photographers Package is $9.99 per month from Adobe.

I will say, iti s a huge mistake to assume LR and PS are going to be any easier to learn than the freebies.  They are not!   Plus every one of them has a support site just like this one.  Almost everything has a web site if you just look.

 

BTW, the 20" monitor might work?

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Super Contributor
Posts: 487
Registered: ‎03-17-2015

Re: DSLR 101

Ok sounds good.  I'll ask Bob for help with DPP if I need any.      I guess the 20" monitor you're talking about is the one I already have???    I did think paid programs have better help files and manuals than freebees.   I can get GIMP and other free ones no problem.   But for now I'm going to work with DPP.  I did see it's discussed about in the software section of this site.  I will do through it more through later after I come back in.  If I have any questions for you I will post it here in DSLR 101.  I'm gonna ask the instructor of our class Photography 101 this saturday about the examples you posted between RAW and Jpg. and see what he says if he sees it.  Will let you know what he said.   

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Posts: 12,704
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DSLR 101

" I'm gonna ask the instructor of our class Photography 101 this saturday about the examples you posted between RAW and Jpg. and see what he says if he sees it.  Will let you know what he said."

 

OK, that's fine.  But if you are looking on a poor monitor you may not learn anything.  You have to be able to see it before you can see it! Smiley Very Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Super Contributor
Posts: 487
Registered: ‎03-17-2015

Re: DSLR 101

I'm not sure what the resolution on my 11" netbook is, it may not be good enough.  But I thought if he sees anything he could point it out to me.  I do see distortions in some of my own pics but not sure what caused them.  Could be the sun, maybe my lens I dunno.  Be nice to be able to identify things like that, then I will know what to do, if anything to fix that..  

 

BTW...in the samples you posted what caused the defects in the jpg....was it in the editing??? 

 

I have taken pics of the shoreline and in my pic the shoreline was curved.  But it was straight to my naked eye.  I guess that is caused by my lens.  It happens more with my Canon SX60 65X Super Zoom, usually at the farthest zoomed range with is over 1300mm.   What is this kind of distortion called?????

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Posts: 12,704
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DSLR 101

It is barrel and pincushion distortion. Wide angle lenses also have perspective distortion.  It may just be a poorly designed lens, too.

 

Everytime, I mean everytime you save a jpg you trash data, or pixels.  It always compresses the file.  RAW never loses any data because you only edit or alter the "recipe" meta data file.

 

I am really sorry I pushed you to RAW.  I don't believ you are ready now.  The noise alone in the samples should have been obivious.  If you are not seeing it, you should probably stick with jpg.  You don't want to have to unlearn anything later because you didn't see what was going on now.  Either that or just convert your RAW files to jpg applying the camera settings and move on. Remember you have to walk before you can run.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Super Contributor
Posts: 487
Registered: ‎03-17-2015

Re: DSLR 101

Well I don't see the harm in staying with RAW since I've started to use RAW and it's really no botherr.  If the RAW files are absolutely better than jpg why would i not go RAW.   And do you save the RAW pics in your H Drive instread of saving jpg????  RAW files are big so I will have to have a dedicated drive exclusive for RAW files.

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Posts: 12,704
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DSLR 101

[ Edited ]

I have two 2TB external hard drives that store all my photos after six months.  Until than they all stay on my 2TB internal HD of which I have two.  The C: drive and the D: drive.

External HD are cheap any more. I sae Microcenter has a 3TB on sale.

 

"... RAW files are absolutely better than jpg why would i not go RAW."

 

First off RAW files are not "absolutely better".  They are better for certain situations.  Otherwise jpg are "absolutely better".

For instance you don't want to send a RAW file to grandma.  Nor do you want to u/l a RAW to Facebook.  jpg are better and necessary.

If I am making a beautiful 8x10 of a bride, I use RAW.  I shoot everything in RAW but on some stuff I convert it to jpg with camera settings applied and be done with it.

jpg tend to be sharper right from the camera.  RAW can be sharper but require editing.  As I have said many times it is all about your requirments.  Neither is right or wrong.  It is what wroks.

 

I just completed this shoot for the local school.  It is RAW because that is what was required.  It is a 54" mural print.  It is a compilation of several photos.

 

lied center text.jpg

 

 

As a photographer you have to decide what is best for the job.  What is best for the customer.  What gear and how am I going to get them what they expect from me.  For snapshots in the park, jpg and the camera set on P is OK.  For something like this mural, it is not OK and a RAW file is needed.  Customers do not understand the problems, nor do they care, a photographer has.  All they want is their photos.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,484
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: DSLR 101


@jazzman1 wrote:

Well I don't see the harm in staying with RAW since I've started to use RAW and it's really no botherr.  If the RAW files are absolutely better than jpg why would i not go RAW.   And do you save the RAW pics in your H Drive instread of saving jpg????  RAW files are big so I will have to have a dedicated drive exclusive for RAW files.


I'll let those who use Lightroom and Photoshoppe advise you regarding those editors. But if you're going to continue to use DPP (and I would if I were you), the advantage of shooting in RAW is significant. Because it's specifically designed for Canon's RAW format, DPP is easier to use, and does a better job, on RAW files than on JPEGs. The advantage extends to printing. If you have a decent printer attached to your computer, you'll get better results if you print directly from DPP than if you save the image as a JPEG and then print it. (Note, however, that differences in printer quality have an even greater effect. So if you're going to have a picture framed for decorative or competitive purposes, you should save it as a JPEG at the highest resolution available and send it to a good commercial print shop.)

 

Yes, RAW files are big, but JPEGs can be pretty big as well. When you save a RAW file as a JPEG, you have considerable latitude in your choice of resolution (i.e., size in pixels) and picture quality (usually specified on a scale of 1 to 10 and reflective of the amount of file compression allowed for each selected value). You should be sure to select a value for each of those parameters that's sufficient for the application, but choosing values that are too high is just a waste of spece.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
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