Canon Community Canon Community
 


Reply
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,815
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow

Even photographers don't use Kelvins the way when they are selecting lighting.

 

For examle, when you buy lighting, you might want 'daylight' color balance.  The daylight is about 5700ºK... that's the actual temperature of our Sun -- a G2 class star.  

 

If you hate the "white" LED light bulbs with the pale blue cast and prefer the light bulbs that resemble what you had with an incandescant light with a golden cast, then you're probably shopping for something in the 2500-3000K range. 

 

If you look at Orion in the winter, you might recognize the stars Betelgeuse and Rigel.  Betelgeuse is a red super-giant star with a temperature of 3500K.  But Regel - the blue star - is about 11,000K.

 

If you own a telescope, then during the summer months you can point it to Alberio - the head of the constellation Cygnus the swan.  But Alberio is actually a double-star and it's one of the most interesting doubles becuse of the very strong color contrast between the two stars.  One is definitely blue, the other is gold.    The "gold" star is just a tiny bit over 4000K.  The "blue" star is a a little over 13,000K.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albireo).

 

Higher color temperatures are bluer... not redder.  Hotter, higher-energy sources pump out wavelengths of light that repeat more frequently.  That produces a bluer color.  Lower energy sources produce wavelengths that repeat less-often... each single wave is longer.  That produces a reddish color.

 

When you buy lighting systems, the color temperatures represented in Kelvins are basically correct for photographic lighting... it's only incorrect when you deal with post-processing software such as DPP or Lightroom. 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
VIP
Posts: 11,358
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow

You can fight it all you want there Tim but you ain't gonna change it.  We both know the facts but others do not and could care less.

No different that the stubborn dpi confusion.  Look at how these guys on this forum replied to that!

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
VIP
Posts: 8,359
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow

[ Edited ]

@sensia25 wrote:
None of that effected DPP3. The culprit is DPP4. WMP has nothing to do with DPP4 as was evidenced from procmon log.

Okay.  Mine runs just fine, though.

 

[EDIT]. BTW, you're correct about none of it having anything to do with DPP.  I never said it did.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,815
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow

I noticed a little sluggishness... a typical adjustment seems to have about a 1-2 second delay before the screen updates.  Granted their huge RAW files.  

 

Mostly what I notice are that in DPP, if I change the white balance, saturation, or most other global image adjustments ... there's about a 1-2 second lag before it shows up on the screen.  If I do the same in Lightroom it seems to happen almost in real-time (delays are minimal).

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,017
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow


@TCampbell wrote:

I get that people will refer to an image as "warmer" as having more amber/orange/red tones and a "cooler" has more blue tones.  My problem is that they state that in Kelvins... and they get it backwards.  If the kelvin value is higher then the image will change to the BLUE side... not the red side.


I agree with your previously stated point about "warm" vs "cool", but in this case I think you misunderstand what DPP is doing. When they set the color temperature (in degrees K), they're referring to the presumed color temperature of the ambient light, not the colors in the image. So if you change the color temperature from 5200 (daylight) to, say, 5700, you're telling the program to correct for a 500-degree increase in its assumption of the color temperature of the ambient light, i.e. to make the resulting image 500 degrees less blue.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,815
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@TCampbell wrote:

I get that people will refer to an image as "warmer" as having more amber/orange/red tones and a "cooler" has more blue tones.  My problem is that they state that in Kelvins... and they get it backwards.  If the kelvin value is higher then the image will change to the BLUE side... not the red side.


I agree with your previously stated point about "warm" vs "cool", but in this case I think you misunderstand what DPP is doing. When they set the color temperature (in degrees K), they're referring to the presumed color temperature of the ambient light, not the colors in the image. So if you change the color temperature from 5200 (daylight) to, say, 5700, you're telling the program to correct for a 500-degree increase in its assumption of the color temperature of the ambient light, i.e. to make the resulting image 500 degrees less blue.


Ahhh... now that makes sense!   I was baffled as to why the colors were shifting opposite of what they should.  

 

This means, in theory, that if I take a RAW shott outside at mid-day (clear sunny day) then bring it into DPP or LR and adjust the white balance to 5780k (the color temperature of sunlight) then I should get reasonably accurate color balance.   (There will likely be some variation based on the sensor filters for a given camera model.)

 

I learned something new today.  Thanks Bob!

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
VIP
Posts: 11,358
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow

The program thinks like a camera and not like a physicist. The temperature slider in LR and the reason the adjustment seems backwards is that you are choosing a color temperature to compensate for, not setting what the color temperature of the image should be. In LR reducing the color temperature value cools off the image, while increasing it warms up the image. This certainly seems backwards based on the actual Kelvin scale for color temperature.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Highlighted
VIP
Posts: 8,359
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: DPP 4.6.10, sickenning slow


@TCampbell wrote:

I noticed a little sluggishness... a typical adjustment seems to have about a 1-2 second delay before the screen updates.  Granted their huge RAW files.  

 

Mostly what I notice are that in DPP, if I change the white balance, saturation, or most other global image adjustments ... there's about a 1-2 second lag before it shows up on the screen.  If I do the same in Lightroom it seems to happen almost in real-time (delays are minimal).

 


I hope this works.  First time I have ever uploaded to YouTube.

 

https://youtu.be/btUuHHqvOQs

 

That is a short clip of how my DPP4 runs on Windows 10.  Does that look slow.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
powered by Lithium

LIKE US on Facebook FOLLOW US on Twitter WATCH US on YouTube CONNECT WITH US on Linkedin WATCH US on Vimeo FOLLOW US on Instagram SHOP CANON at the Canon Online Store
© Canon U.S.A., Inc.   |    Terms of Use   |    Privacy Statement