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New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-26-2017
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Canon T50

I got a Canon T50 35mm in a garage sale for a few dollars, batteries are in and i'm wondering what is the iso for a color film that i should get for it and the same for black and white.

 

I have read some part of the user manual but because i'm using EOS camera since a long time i would like to have your recommandations about that.

 

Thank you

Product Expert
Posts: 978
Registered: ‎10-16-2012

Re: Canon T50

Hi Bertrand1,

 

Thanks for posting.

 

Regardless of whether you're using color or black & white film, its ISO number (for example ISO 100) represent its sensitivity to light. The higher the number, the less light needed for an exposure. Thus with ISO 400 you can shoot even in dim light.

 

For typical daylight shots, I'd use a speed, such as 100. In brilliantly lit areas, an ISO speed of 25 may be all you need. If you're shooting at night, an ISO film speed of 1000 or even 1600 may be needed.

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VIP
Posts: 11,660
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon T50

One of my favorites is Fujifilm Fujicolor 200 Color Negative Film.  ISO is 200.  Kodak Tri-X Pan 400 is one of my favorite B&W.  ISO is 400.

 

The basic rule of thumb is the Sunny 16 Rule.  It says in bright daylight you set the camera like this; If your ISO is 200 at f/16, then your shutter speed will be 1/200 seconds. If your ISO is 400, then your shutter speed will be 1/400 seconds or the closest which would be 1/500 on a T50.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
VIP
Posts: 11,660
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon T50

Of course the granddaddy and likely the best film ever was KodachromeKodachrome was the first color film that used a subtractive color method to be successfully mass-marketed. No longer made. 

A close second is Ektachrome.  Ektachrome had the advantage of being able to be processed by almost anyone. Kodachrome requires a complex lab to process.   Ektachrome is also much faster than Kodachrome, meaning a higher ISO number.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-26-2017

Re: Canon T50

Thanks all for the replies.

 

I take a lot of photography, i have a T2i and a T3i (i know they are not really new) and i have 5 different lenses that i can use with them so i know a little bit about ISO, aperture and other configurations. A photograph in my area told me once to invest in lenses more than in camera and that is what i did Smiley Happy

 

With old 35mm camera and film i'm a beginner and for me it's to know if the result is going to be the same. I want to use the best film and learn what configuration you use in daylight or in dim light or in the middle of the night. Some film are probably better in certain condition so keep writing your advices and thanks for doing it.

VIP
Posts: 11,660
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon T50

In that case you want Ektachrome.  It has a huge ISO range possible.  You can process it yourself. Last current Ektachrome process is E6 and is used for all major color reversal films.  Ektachrome can be easily push-processed to ISO 1600.  It is supposed to return this year but I really don't keep up on it.  Just what I hear from the grapevine.  Check some of the big retail stores to see what they have.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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