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Valued Contributor
Posts: 363
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"... Nik*on is set to announce its new flagship, the D6, ..."

 

Smiley Happy Yes, and I love'em.  I have owned several, D2x, D3, D3x but I always come back to my Canons. Canon 1 series just feel better. They feel better made, they feel better in my hand.  Each brand has its strong points and weaknesses. I finally unloaded all my Nikon gear, this year, and have no intention of getting any more. To me and I know to others it (Nikon) is fantastic gear but it's just not a Canon 1 series.

 

.........am I hi-jacking, too?


No, you're not hijacking, as I already hijacked my own thread. However. what you are stating about the Canon 1 "feeling better" in the hand, is of course subjective. Others would say that Nikon "feels better." I've not handled the D5 specifically, so I can't comment on that specific model. But in the end, each photographer must decide for himself, which camera feels best and more capable for their style of photography. In other words, Ernie, YMMV Smiley Happy

VIP
Posts: 8,168
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

[ Edited ]

@John_SD wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"... Nik*on is set to announce its new flagship, the D6, ..."

 

Smiley Happy Yes, and I love'em.  I have owned several, D2x, D3, D3x but I always come back to my Canons. Canon 1 series just feel better. They feel better made, they feel better in my hand.  Each brand has its strong points and weaknesses. I finally unloaded all my Nikon gear, this year, and have no intention of getting any more. To me and I know to others it (Nikon) is fantastic gear but it's just not a Canon 1 series.

 

.........am I hi-jacking, too?


No, you're not hijacking, as I already hijacked my own thread. However. what you are stating about the Canon 1 "feeling better" in the hand, is of course subjective. Others would say that Nikon "feels better." I've not handled the D5 specifically, so I can't comment on that specific model. But in the end, each photographer must decide for himself, which camera feels best and more capable for their style of photography. In other words, Ernie, YMMV Smiley Happy


I have a 1D Mark IV and D3.  I agree with what Ernie is saying about feel in the hand.  It is more of an ergonomic than subjective observation.  I have to hold the Nikon D3 slightly differently to reach buttons than I would with the Canon 1D Mark IV.  This changes the balance of the camera in your hand.  Plus, the Canon feels like it has a deeper grip than the Nikon.

 

Canon places the main dial wheel to adjust shutter speed on top of the camera where your forefinger can adjust it.  Nikon places the equivalent function on a wheel on the rear panel where your thumb would adjust it.  The Nikon has buttons so that you can adjust many settings without having to go into a menu like you would on the Canon, most of which I do not adjust very often.  

 

Nikon has a secondary dial wheel on top of the body, so you can swap the wheel functions if you want.  But the Nikon top dial is not in as convenient spot as the Canon top dial, so I do not swap out the dial functions.  Again, in order to reach the thumb dial you have to hold the Nikon a little differently than the Canon, which changes the way the weight balances in your hand.

 

On the Canon, I use my thumb to press buttons, sometimes in conjunction with the main dial.  On the Nikon, there are buttons on the top of the camera body that you would press while turning the main thumb dial.  The problem is that you have to press the top buttons by feel, or stop and look at the top of camera to make sure you press the right button.

 

Besides exposure settings, I do change between AF-S [One Shot] and AF-C {AI Servo} focusing the most.  But, this button is on the front of the body, where once again you have to stop and look at the camera or adjust it by feel.  The only part of the camera I want to look at is the rear panel.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Valued Contributor
Posts: 363
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

All those cameras you mention are long in the tooth. Of the recent Nikons, I love the D850, which I've had the opportunity to play around with at a local shop. I would not spend the kind of coin that a D6 will likely cost upon its release. I cannot justify it. But I will be honest with you. I am growing weary of what I perceive as some sort of identity crisis at Canon. You yourself made a great point the other day in referencing Canon's increasing number of mounts. What are they doing? Even if I switch to Nikon, I intend to stay a part of this group because I will remain a Canon shooter, and because I like this group. I have no plans to sell my lowly equipment. But just from my limited exposure, I prefer Nikon cameras, even the D750, which itself is long in the tooth. I also played around with the new Z6, which I really like. YMMV. 

VIP
Posts: 8,168
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

[ Edited ]

@John_SD wrote:

All those cameras you mention are long in the tooth. Of the recent Nikons, I love the D850, which I've had the opportunity to play around with at a local shop. I would not spend the kind of coin that a D6 will likely cost upon its release. I cannot justify it. But I will be honest with you. I am growing weary of what I perceive as some sort of identity crisis at Canon. You yourself made a great point the other day in referencing Canon's increasing number of mounts. What are they doing? Even if I switch to Nikon, I intend to stay a part of this group because I will remain a Canon shooter, and because I like this group. I have no plans to sell my lowly equipment. But just from my limited exposure, I prefer Nikon cameras, even the D750, which itself is long in the tooth. I also played around with the new Z6, which I really like. YMMV. 


Age of the bodies has nothing to do with it.  The ergonomics have not changed, and are still the same on every Nikon body being sold today.  The main dial is on the back of the body, which forces you to use your thumb. The secondary dial is in a bad spot to use as a main dial.

 

There are functional differences I like, too.  All Canon DSLR bodies allow you to use the rear display as a rea time display of your exposure settings.  When you using a tripod, you are not forced to look through the viewfinder, or use the tiny top LCD display to see your exposure settings.  Just disable the shutter blanking the rear display, and use the [INFO] button to call up the exposure display that resembles the Quick Menu screen.

 

I do not know if the newer Nikon bodies can do it, but the D3 cannot do it.  There is no option in the D3 to stop the shutter button from automatically blanking the rear display.  You are forced to use the viewfinder, or the top LCD, to set your exposure.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 11,200
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

"The Nikon has buttons so that you can adjust many settings ..."

 

Some without knowing it.  The D4 has all buttons fixed so accidential pressing won't happen.  All Nikon D series cameras feel almost the same. Just like my 1D feels alomsot like my (1Ds Mk II, 1D MkIIn, 1Ds Mk III, Mk IV) 1DX.  With the D4 Nikon made the wheel larger which helps a lot.

 

"It is more of an ergonomic than subjective observation."

 

Whatever you call you are correct, sir!  Smiley Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
VIP
Posts: 11,200
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

John,

This is why I qualified my post.........

"I know to others it (Nikon) is fantastic gear ........"

 

However,

"... but it's just not a Canon 1 series."

 

Perhaps it does just come down to how each body feels and its ergonomics effect each individual.  Because both are fantastic miracles of innovation. Back when I started I would have never thought there would be cameras like we have today. 

 

Canon just won!  Smiley Wink

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
VIP
Posts: 11,200
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

"I love the D850, which I've had the opportunity to play around with at a local shop."

 

This D850 almost got me.  I got to spend some quality time (way more than just in a shop) with one and I already had a ton of Nikkor glass.  I stll have friends that do not see the light and still use Nikons. Smiley Happy Anyway one guy let me borrow his D850.  It is utterly a super camera. IQ out of this world. Perhaps still the best there is. 

 

Ever so often, well actually fairly often, a camera comes along and I can't resist it.  I try believe me I try.  The 90D is doing the same thing but I have not touched one yet.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
VIP
Posts: 11,200
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

"The ergonomics have not changed, and are still the same on every Nikon body being sold today."

 

I have used all the D series Nikons and you can tell there is a difference but you would not be challenged at all with any of them.  You will feel right at home with any D model.  The same is true with the 1 series Canons, small differences but essentially the same. The move from the 1D to the 1D Mk II is fairly big but after the MkIIn the rest are close.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
Reputable Contributor
Posts: 540
Registered: ‎01-25-2018

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II

I went from a 1D Mark II to using 1DX and 1DX 2 bodies and it was an easy transition with very little readjustment time. 

 

BUT even a small change in the ergonomic design is noticeable.  I shoot a lot of sports with the 1DX 2 and 1DX and my typical setup is either a 300 or 400 2.8 prime on the 1DX 2 and a 70-200 2.8 on the 1DX.  At times I change the focus point setup when capturing different aspects of a game, sometimes using a single high precision single point and other times allowing the predictive focus tracking to work with several points. The multicontroller pad buttons for the 1DX are a bit taller than those for the 1DX 2; either works fine but I had to "train" myself that I wasn't touching the wrong control when I first started shooting with both bodies because out of habit you expect the same height difference between the body and control surface with both cameras.  It is a minor thing that I quickly got used to but it shows how something very small is noticeable when you are working by feel under time pressure; sort of like the way it is amazing that a tiny rock barely bigger than a grain of sand feels like a huge rock when it gets inside my shoe when I am running.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M2, 1DX, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video
Valued Contributor
Posts: 363
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Canon EOS 90D, M6 Mark II


@ebiggs1 wrote:

 

Perhaps it does just come down to how each body feels and its ergonomics effect each individual.  Because both are fantastic miracles of innovation. Back when I started I would have never thought there would be cameras like we have today. 


I think you have it right. This stuff about this dial being in a bad spot, or that button being a millimeter farther to the left than one is accumstomed to, etc., is completely subjective and doesn't make the camera an ergonomic failure. 

 

There are just too many enthusiasts and pros alike singing the praises of Nikon bodies, menus and yes, even glass, to believe that there is some inherent failure of ergonomics or performance related to the products. 

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