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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎08-01-2015

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings


@TTMartin wrote:

@EvrenDumanoglu wrote:

 

My question is;

What should be my camera setting for interior. . .

 

Thank you

 

 

Evren Dumanoglu

Photographer 

 


All I can say is Wow!
My suggestion would be to hire an actual photographer to train you.
Short of that, try the Green A+ intellegent auto mode.

From what has been said in this discussion, the above quote is the correct answer.

 

Based on the initial settings the OP says he used and the susequent responses, forgive me but it seems to me that you have spent very little time actually using a camera despite the fact that you say you are a photographer.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-20-2015

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

I'm using Lightroom and Photoshop with RAW file format.
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-20-2015

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

Thank you for your help... I think all about sharpening.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,921
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

[ Edited ]

@Bryston3bsst wrote:

@TTMartin wrote:

@EvrenDumanoglu wrote:

 

My question is;

What should be my camera setting for interior. . .

 

Thank you

 

 

Evren Dumanoglu

Photographer 

 


All I can say is Wow!
My suggestion would be to hire an actual photographer to train you.
Short of that, try the Green A+ intellegent auto mode.

From what has been said in this discussion, the above quote is the correct answer.

 

Based on the initial settings the OP says he used and the susequent responses, forgive me but it seems to me that you have spent very little time actually using a camera despite the fact that you say you are a photographer.


I agree. A photographer who asks newbie questions, then gets defensive when somebody notices, is probably a newbie. Which doesn't mean that the OP lacks the talent and ambition to succeed. But there's going to be a learning curve there, and admitting it is the first step in traversing the curve.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
VIP
Posts: 10,993
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

This is my suggestion, too!

 

"My suggestion would be to hire an actual photographer to train you.

Short of that, try the Green A+ intellegent auto mode."
Sharpening is not your problem. Smiley Frustrated  And with out actually seeing the venue, no one here can tell you the settings.  But using what little info you stated, your settings are completely wrong, IMHO.
I am guessing you want a large DOF and you have very little availble light?  You will have to balance each to get the best outcome.  The 6D should be able to handle ISO 800 or possibly 1600 without too much grain.  You may be restricted to middle of the ramge f ratios.  Like f5.6 for instance.  Don't try to get too close.
And despite what has been said, PS can improve the finished image.  You need to use the adjustments in ACR 9 first and open in PS.  You need to know "how" to use PS and LR and not just move slidders!   But you already know that? One more accessary that will help you is a good tripod.

 

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎08-01-2015

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

I think we have all probably been in furniture showrooms. They are all pretty well lit, in fact, many now are using color corrected lighting. Last one I was in was just a few months ago and I remember thinking how fun it would be to do a model shoot in it.

 

I cannot imagine not being able to get excellent results under those condirions using a 6D.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,805
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

I am fond of saying that (1) if the subject is not moving (and let's hope that a furniture showroom isn't moving or you're probably having an earthquake) and also (2) if the camera is also not moving, then (3) there is always enough light to expose thes shot.

 

Do you own a tripod and a remote shuter release (remote shutter relase being optional, but it's what I prefer to use when I want to make sure the camera cannot move as I take a long exposure shot.)

 

f/20 will be diffraction limited.  See:  http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/diffraction-photography.htm

 

Based on the sensor size and resolution of a 6D body, it will not be diffraction limited at or below f/11, but will be diffraction limited above f/11 (e.g. f/16, for example, would be diffraction limited.)  Someone may not notice it unless they inspect closely.  The higher you go, the more easily the image will appear to be soft due to the physics of diffraction limits.

 

Note that diffraction limits are based on laws of physics and the math to determine diffraction limits assume the lens is not a factor (e.g. assume the lens is perfect.)  In other words... the quality of the camera and lens are not factors here.

 

At f/11, you'd have TREMENDOUS depth of field even if using the 16-35mm lens at the 35mm focal length (which would provide the narrowest depth of field for any given focus distance).

 

Assuming a focus distance of 15, the Depth of Field at f/8 is 127' (everything from 8' through 135' away will appear to be in reasonably good focus.)  

 

At f/11 that DoF becomes infinite on the far end (the hyperfocal distance for a 35mm focal length at f/11 is 12' meaning... if you focus the lens to 12' away from the subject everything from 6' through infinity will be in focus.

 

There's no need to use f/20 and it will "soften" the quality of the image (which may result in you wanting to apply more sharpening and sharpening can generate noise as a side-effect of the sharpening process.)

 

If you are shooting at ISO 100 with the 6D and using RAW, you should have no noticeable noise.  If you do have "noise" then it would be helpful if you could post an unprocessed example (completely with all EXIF data still intact) so we can see what it is. I'm wondering if you might be noticing something else (e.g. JPEG compression artificacts can show up in shadowy areas of an image regardless of the ISO.)

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Highlighted
Reputable Contributor
Posts: 766
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Canon EOS 6D Settings

You also mentioned the "spotlighting" in the showroom. Depending upon what type of lighting it is, you may have problems.

 

If it's halogen or tungsten, set a custom white balance. There are neat targets available for this purpose (Lastolite EZ Balance are some I use), but even a plain white piece of paper or a "gray card" would be adequate.

 

If it's fluorescent (or sodium vapor or mercury vapor, which are unlikely), also set a custom white balance, but don't be surprised if some of your shots have color casts and/or exposure issues. These types of lighting cycle on and off 120 times a second, which our eyes don't see but our cameras might. It messes with both the color of light and the level of exposure. Nothing can be done about it (some of the newer Canon models try to deal with it using a Flicker Free technology, but the 6D doesn't). Just take plenty of extra shots and check them as best you can during the shoot, to be sure to get what you need with these types of lights.

 

You also could use flash, but that will introduce another color of light if it's mixed with the ambient lighting. You either need to filter the flash or filter the ambient light, to try to make them match in color temp.

 

It might be easier to make long exposures and if you have some issues with shadows, either set up some fill lights using the same bulbs as the ambient lighting uses or use some large white foam core or cardboard to "bounce" some of the ambient light to fill the shadows.

 

I would certainly use a tripod, too. I'd also use f16 at the smallest (f11 would be better). Use hyperfocal distance to set your point of focus and check things using Depth of Field Preview and Live view, to be sure you have adequate depth of field. 

 

Set an 800 or lower ISO and use a long shutter speed. If your exposure is 1 second or longer you can enable Long Exposure Noise Reduction on the camera, but need to be aware how it works. LENR only works with 1 second or longer exposures, and after your first exposure of the subject, the camera will take a second exposure of the same duration with the shutter closed. It uses this second "blank" exposure to identify the noise in the image, which it  then subtracts from the first exposure. If you inadvertently (or deliberately) interrupt the second exposure before it's completed, the camera discards both it and the first shot. (Some people making long exposures with LENR enabled think the camera is going whacky and cancel the second exposure by turning the camera off or pulling the battery, then wonder where their first shot went.)

 

Yes, selective sharpening such as was mentioned earlier helps minimize the appearance of noise. The 6D is one of the most image noise-free cameras that Canon has ever made, so you might even be able to use higher ISOs. You also can do noise reduction. I do a little in Lightroom, but will also use a Noiseware Photoshop plug-in for especially high ISO shots... It's even possible to do NR in each separate color channel with it, if needed. Do any noise reduction before final sharpening of the image.

 

Sharpening is best done in steps. Do some in Lightroom, but tread lightly until you have done any cropping and sized the image for it's final use... then finish sharpening with the image magnified so you can watch for any artifacts or other issues that sharpening might cause.

 

It sounds as if you'll need to do some experimentation... but once you have it worked out, it will be faster to set up and shoot the second and subsequent times.

 

***********


Alan Myers
San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & EXPOSUREMANAGER 

 

 

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