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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎08-10-2017

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

Tnx bro. Or if anyone have servise manual for 450D , 1000D .... I will check all fuses on board, and DCDC board. But cant find any service manual.
Super Contributor
Posts: 264
Registered: ‎09-29-2015

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

There is service manual for 1000D But it is not free.

New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-25-2018

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

[ Edited ]

Hi Peter,

 

the fact that many Canon 1000D / KISS F / Rebel XS were disposed due the the infamous "busy error" is widely known.

I understand you want to know the cause of the fault and that you did not find the answer yet.

 

The cause of the problem is that spontaneously the camera ends in an endless boot loop due to a buggy boot loader coming with the original firmware 1.0.3. It can also be a minor fault with Error 99 or other unexplainable behaviour where the camera is still addressable bot does not behave as it should do.

 

If the camera is still addressable and receives an upgrade with the common 1.0.6 firmware (or with 1.0.7) it is still not guaranteed that the bug is removed . Though the camera shows the new firmware installed the old boot loader from 1.0.3 is still in place so the better way to overwrite the buggy boot loader is done by a special service firmware 1.0.6.

 

Normally the user will download the firmware file e6kr5106.fir from Canon and install it. In my case the file has the size of 7.257 KB while Canon service would use the file EOS1000D_RXS106SC.FIR which is 8.175 KB large. The difference is because the service firmware contains the new boot loader.

 

By using this special firmware I managed to heal couple of cameras that had the Error 99 or where the battery would have to be removed after each shot. After applying this special firmware I installed the latest firmware 1.0.7. and never faced any boot loops. Whenever I met a Canon 1000D user I applied the service firmware to prevent a future boot loop.

 

How does Canon proceed in case a customer sends the bricked camera in which is is in the boot loop (large LCD dead and "busy" in viewfinder?

 

They use a hardware tool that connects to the hot shoe adapter to monitor the camera and to apply the new firmware. This recovery process is very simple and done in minutes.

 

Surprising to me that (Canon 1000D is there since 2008) the community is still in blur about the fact that the boot loop to most known as "busy error" this is a manufacturers fault which MUST be corrected by Canon at NO COST.

 

Thanks to one service engineer I learned that any authorized Canon service center is bound to correct this fault until the cameras End of Life in July 2018. I prefer the word correct rather than repair because I regard a firmware upgrade as correction. From the standpoint of an engineer I question why many of Canon service centers (in Germany) will state the customer that the fault can be only repaired by changing the digital main board (they write "Austausch des Leiterplattensystems") which appears to be complex for a cost of approx. 250 Euro while the current market value of the camera may be max 50% of the repair cost for a 5-minute-job.

 

In most cases such a cost estimate will results that clients sell these bricked cameras for 50 Euro or less on Ebay ending being frustrated why of the camera's sudden death.

 

I would not believe this practice if I had not purchased several bricked cameras from clients having the original Canon cost estimate attached to it. After I sent these cameras to Canon and having them repaired at no cost except the shipping cost to Canon. It is hard to believe that I was so lucky to find one engineer who chose truth and explained to me the internal process. Would he be the exception? Surely not but I am surprised why customers had not reported their positive experience with Canon after the correction was done at no cost to help aggrieved parties rather leaving them disposing the cameras as bargain (or as in Germany e.g. in order not to pay the extra 20 Euro for the absurd cost estimate let Canon dispose the camera free of charge...).

 

There are numberless threads asking how to deal with this "busy error" with ten times more useless answers per thread such as formatting the SD card or taking the battery out for hours but no answer to contact Canon's repair center claiming the consumer right. I am sure that a persistent request to Canon factory would help the customers to get their right.

 

It is up to the community to challenge such a manufacturers treatment:

 

Did the staff not follow Canons service bulletin because they were not aware that a firmware update has to be done rather than changing the digital main board with the rat-tail of subsequent camera adjustment? Or did they apply the patch, downloaded the camera and digital data, replaced the board, uloaded the original data back to camera save the 1 hour service adjustment?

 

Were they unaware about their duty to explain the customer that the repair is free of charge until the End of Life of the Canon 1000D?

 

Did they hope to make extra money from a frustrated customer?

 

Or did they hope to motivate the customer will happily purchase the 1000D's successor?

 

Hopefully brought a bit of clarity to this actually very simple firmware brick.

New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-25-2018

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

@ Peter,


the fact that many Canon 1000D / KISS F / Rebel XS were disposed due the the infamous "busy error" is widely known.

I understand you want to know the cause of the fault and that you did not find the answer yet.


The cause of the problem is that spontaneously the camera ends in an endless boot loop due to a buggy boot loader coming from in the original firmware 1.0.3. It can also be a minor fault with Error 99 or other unexplainable behaviour.


If the camera is still addressable and receives an upgrade with the common 1.0.6 firmware (or with 1.0.7) it is still not guaranteed that the bug is removed . Though the camera shows the new firmware installed the old boot loader from 1.0.3 is still in place so the better way to overwrite the buggy boot loader is done by a special service firmware 1.0.6.


Normally the user will download the firmware file e6kr5106.fir from Canon andf install it. It has the size of 7.257 KB while it needs a special service firmware EOS1000D_RXS106SC.FIR of 8.175 KB size. The difference is because the service firmware contains the new boot loader.


By using this special firmware I managed to heal couple of cameras that had the Error 99 or where the battery would have to be removed after each shot. After applying this special firmware I installed the latest firmware 1.0.7. and never faced any boot loops.


How would Canon proceed in case a customer sends the bricked camera in which is is in the boot loop (large LCD dead and "busy" in viewfinder?


They use a hardware tool that connects to the hot shoe adapter and the the camera can be controlled to replace the bricked boot loader. This recovery process is very simple and done in minutes.


Surprising to me that up to date (Canon 1000D is there since 2008) the community is in blur about the fact that the boot loop to most known as "busy error" is a manufacturers fault which MUST be corrected by Canon at NO COST until the cameras End of Life in July 2018.


I hope I could bring a bit of clarity to this actually very simple firmware brick.

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 693
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

Than you very much Iami!
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Moderator
Posts: 1,176
Registered: ‎10-25-2012

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

Hi iami,

 

The Rebel XS actually ended its service life on December 30, 2015 here at Canon USA. That means our Factory Service Centers no longer have the ability to perform service on this model. 

 

If anyone has any questions about this, or the Canon Upgrade Program here in the USA, please contact our team at 1-800-OK-CANON (800-652-2666) from 8am to Midnight (ET) weekdays and 10am to 8pm (ET) Saturdays. 

 

If you're outside of the USA, please reach out to Canon in your area by clicking HERE

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,939
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

California's Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Act — manufacturers of most household electronic goods that sell for more than $100 have to provide spare parts for up to seven years, regardless of warranty status.

If they fail to do so, lawyers say, consumers have a strong case for demanding a replacement product.

Moderator
Posts: 1,176
Registered: ‎10-25-2012

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

We're aware. The Rebel XS came out in 2008. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,939
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY


@Stephenwrote:

We're aware. The Rebel XS came out in 2008. 


The 7 years is from the last date of manufacture, no the date of introduction. 

Moderator
Posts: 1,176
Registered: ‎10-25-2012

Re: Canon EOS 1000D problem buSY

Tom or Elizabeth,

 

If you're having an issue with your Rebel XS, you're welcome to contact support at 1-800-OK-CANON (800-652-2666) tomorrow between 8am and Midnight (ET) for any support options that are available to you. 

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