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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎02-13-2013

Re: Accidental Lens Release


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"Sounds to me like there are a handful of people that need to review how they handle their equipment given that there are hundreds or thousands, perhaps millions, of Canon DSLR users worldwide that don't seem to be having a problem with it."

 

I agree. Going on 50 years of daily use of Canon gear and it hasn't happened to me.  Using cameras from the 1D to the1D Mk IV and even the 5D to the 5D Mk III.  I feel for these folks but I do think they need to really revisit how they handle their gear.

 

 


Yep - because it hasn't happened to you then there isn't a problem. Very good. Thanks.

VIP
Posts: 8,492
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Accidental Lens Release


@schmegg wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"Sounds to me like there are a handful of people that need to review how they handle their equipment given that there are hundreds or thousands, perhaps millions, of Canon DSLR users worldwide that don't seem to be having a problem with it."

 

I agree. Going on 50 years of daily use of Canon gear and it hasn't happened to me.  Using cameras from the 1D to the1D Mk IV and even the 5D to the 5D Mk III.  I feel for these folks but I do think they need to really revisit how they handle their gear.

 

 


Yep - because it hasn't happened to you then there isn't a problem. Very good. Thanks.


It stretches the limits of beliefs that everyone who has had a lens unexpectedly drop off, that it was caused by a manufacturing defect, and not operator error.  

 

If you have suffered a costly loss because your gear dropped, then you have my sympathies.  But, to automatically and categorically rule out any possibility that you could have unknowingly triggered the release is simply outright denial, plain and simple. 

 

Such denials, is probably why their lenses fell off in the first place.  They.just simply were not paying close attention, and cannot come up with a better excuse.  It has nearly happened to me.  But, I caught myself in time.

 

If you [plural] wish to deny the possibility of operator error, then more dropped lenses is in your future.  Good luck.

 

 

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎02-13-2013

Re: Accidental Lens Release

[ Edited ]

Beats me why, when a few people express their concerns with a design feature, that some feel it's necessary to defend that feature and imply that those affected are in some way incompotent. But, it happens on forums - much more than in face-to-face interactions.

 

The fact remains, over the years the lens release button has grown larger and more prominent. And, even for those of us that have been using this gear for over three decades, it now occasionally seems that lenses can be released without the express intention of the photographer.

 

I'm sure that on some of these occasions the photographer was purely negligent in mounting the lens etc. I'm also sure that in some other cases, the photographer has had plenty of experience and has carriued out all due diligence and has still had a lens come loose.

 

It's the later that concerns me and I'd like to bring that to the attention of Canon so that they may consider it further in future designs.

 

Those chiming in with unhelpful diatribe about the ineptitude of the operator are, in my mind, simply trolling the subject - probably because they are massive brand fanboys. And there's nothing wrong with loving a brand, but, if you truly love it, you'll want it to continue to develop its designs in a sensible direction. And part of that process is taking feedback - both good and bad - from its customers.

 

I, and some others here, are trying to give that feedback. Continual rebuttal by others is neither helpful nor constructive.

 

Thanks for nothing.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,042
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Accidental Lens Release


@schmegg wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"Sounds to me like there are a handful of people that need to review how they handle their equipment given that there are hundreds or thousands, perhaps millions, of Canon DSLR users worldwide that don't seem to be having a problem with it."

 

I agree. Going on 50 years of daily use of Canon gear and it hasn't happened to me.  Using cameras from the 1D to the1D Mk IV and even the 5D to the 5D Mk III.  I feel for these folks but I do think they need to really revisit how they handle their gear.

 


Yep - because it hasn't happened to you then there isn't a problem. Very good. Thanks.


Much has been written in this forum about that problem. You should read it all, taking particular note of the fact that some ways of holding the camera can put your left hand in contact with the lens release button, while others probably can't. So if, as some claim, the release button is too easy to press, you should at least be able to minimize the risk.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎02-13-2013

Re: Accidental Lens Release

Yeah. I agree Bob that there should (and are) ways to circumvent a nasty surprise by modifying the way the gear is handled.

 

Clearly the lens just doesn't unlock by itself - some amount of physical interaction is required to make that happen. I guess that makes those who've had it happen easy targets. Hehe.

 

ebiggs1 has an extra twenty years with Canon gear over me and he's had no problem. There'd be many, many thousands of others who've had no issue either.

 

My reason for joining this thread was simply because I have been a Canon shooter for over three decades and I've only recently had this happen to me after all those years. I've not become less diligent or careful with the way I handle my gear, but the situation regarding confidence in the lens mount, at least for me, has changed. And, coupled with this is the fact that the lens release button has become larger and easier to push.

 

Might be a coincedence, or, as I feel, they may be related. I tend to think they are related based on my experience. I can understand why others, who have plenty of experience with Canon gear but have not encountered the issue might feel otherwise.

 

Anyway - I don't know if I'm right in connecting the recent trend for larger, easier pressed lens release buttons with the recent 'accidental' release of a couple of my lenses, but I'd really like it if Canon considered this going forward. That's all. Nothing more.

 

Appologies if I seem to be labouring the point. Just trying to counter the dismissal peddled by others because I can assure you that I am careful with my gear, delibrate with its use and have decades of experience, most of which saw mounted lenses stay assuredly and safely on the body. I'd be happy to leave it at that but there seems to be a couple of people here who jump back in, without having experienceed the issue, to dismiss it as user error. I'm sure sometimes that's the case. I'm also sure that sometimes it's not so cut and dried.

VIP
Posts: 8,492
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Accidental Lens Release

[ Edited ]

Schmegg,

If you make the assumption that it is always your fault, an accidental release may never happen to you again.

 

I used to work with electronic technicians troubleshooting control systems.  I would sometimes step in, and help them trace down a nagging problem.  Most of the time, and I mean most of the time, we would find a wire connection that had somehow come apart, and became separated from a terminal strip.

 

The wires had "ring" shaped connectors on the ends.  The rings resembled a washer.  The terminal screw had to be removed so that the "ring" connector could be put in place before the terminal screw was threaded down.  It was a very secure arrangement.

 

Somehow, we would open a panel and find that wire disconnected from the terminal, yet the screw was still in place on the terminal.  Obviously, someone had removed the wire in the course of their troubleshooting in another nearby panel, and had simply forgotten to restore a connection.  It's an easy, though careless, oversight to make.

 

However, some of the technicians would never admit to such an oversight, as minor as it was.  The cost of re-attaching a wire is only a labor cost, not a material cost.  The techs would argue that the wire had come loose on its' own.  Of course, the odds of a screw removing itself, and then replacing itself, are within the realm of possibility, but truly astronomical just the same.

 

 

 

The Canon EF mount has been in use for decades, and it seems to have changed very little over time.  Yet, in recent years their has been an apparent rise in the number of people suffering from lenses spontaneously dropping off of the cameras.  So, what has changed?

 

 I don't think the lens mounts have changed, but I do think they way people use and carry their gear has changed.  Most of the complaints on this thread have come from people carrying their camera/lens combos in a sling, or otherwise handling their gear in a hundred different ways, except actually using it to shoot photographs.  

 

In othe words, all of these accidental releases seem to have one thing in common.  They seem to occur immediately after the gear had not been handled for a period of time, just like the wires that had come apart in the terminal cabinets I inspected with technicians.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 11,508
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Accidental Lens Release

"Yep - because it hasn't happened to you then there isn't a problem. Very good. Thanks."

 

I know if it has happened to you, it is a more heartbreaking event.  The fact it hasn't happened to me is no indication it can't.  That was not my point.  But the fact it hasn't happened to me and thousands of Canon owners does say something.

 

In addition, I use Nikon cameras, too.  The button is in very nearly in the exact same place.  It may even be slightly larger and stick out slightly more.  I haven't lost a lens form one of them either for whatever that's worth.  I will point out that the lens on a Nikon turns the opposite direction.

 

 

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎02-13-2013

Re: Accidental Lens Release

[ Edited ]

@Waddizzle wrote:

Schmegg,

If you make the assumption that it is always your fault, an accidental release may never happen to you again.

 

Hehe. Yep. Get your drift here. And that has been exactly my approach.

 

I used to work with electronic technicians troubleshooting control systems.  I would sometimes step in, and help them trace down a nagging problem.  Most of the time, and I mean most of the time, we would find a wire connection that had somehow come apart, and became separated from a terminal strip.

 

The wires had "ring" shaped connectors on the ends.  The rings resembled a washer.  The terminal screw had to be removed so that the "ring" connector could be put in place before the terminal screw was threaded down.  It was a very secure arrangement.

 

Somehow, we would open a panel and find that wire disconnected from the terminal, yet the screw was still in place on the terminal.  Obviously, someone had removed the wire in the course of their troubleshooting in another nearby panel, and had simply forgotten to restore a connection.  It's an easy, though careless, oversight to make.

 

However, some of the technicians would never admit to such an oversight, as minor as it was.  The cost of re-attaching a wire is only a labor cost, not a material cost.  The techs would argue that the wire had come loose on its' own.  Of course, the odds of a screw removing itself, and then replacing itself, are within the realm of possibility, but truly astronomical just the same.

 

OK. So here it seems you are once again subtly intimating that it's purely user error and has absolutely noting at all, in any way, shape or form, to do with the design of the gear in question. And that is where we differ in opinion my friend. 

 

The Canon EF mount has been in use for decades, and it seems to have changed very little over time.  Yet, in recent years their has been an apparent rise in the number of people suffering from lenses spontaneously dropping off of the cameras.  So, what has changed?

 

 I don't think the lens mounts have changed, but I do think they way people use and carry their gear has changed.

 

Yes. That is perhaps true. And it be prudent for manufacturers to be aware of the changing ways in which their gear is being used and continue to cater for that. IMHO.

 

 Most of the complaints on this thread have come from people carrying their camera/lens combos in a sling, or otherwise handling their gear in a hundred different ways, except actually using it to shoot photographs.  

 

Perhaps. But transporting a camera/lens combo is definitely part of the process of photography. And as slings have become much more popular (because they are very convienent) I feel it would be sensible for the camera design to evolve with this change. Once again, just my take on it.

 

In othe words, all of these accidental releases seem to have one thing in common.  They seem to occur immediately after the gear had not been handled for a period of time, just like the wires that had come apart in the terminal cabinets I inspected with technicians.

 

No, not like the wires in the cabinet at all. Certainly not in my case anyway. The fact that you think they are analogous tells me that you think I'm either lying about what happened or am mistaken about my own actions (like you'd know better!). You can probably understand that this rubs me the wrong way a little.


 

Highlighted
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎02-13-2013

Re: Accidental Lens Release


@ebiggs1 wrote:

 

I know if it has happened to you, it is a more heartbreaking event.  The fact it hasn't happened to me is no indication it can't.  That was not my point.  But the fact it hasn't happened to me and thousands of Canon owners does say something.

 

Yes. True. I wold imagine that my experience is most definitely a minority one. Thankfully. I ony hope it stays that way. Which is kinda the point here for me really.

 

Sorry to labour this point, but it seems there have been just a few here who, for whatever reason, have attempted to downplay this issue. Perhaps it's my fault - I never intended to make out that this was a huge, earth shattering problem. But I would like Canon to consider this going forward. The fact that this is happening is not great. It's all too easy to say - 'oh, noob error' or 'you're doing it wrong' or such. I'm just trying to point out that this can also happen to experienced people who are careful and deliberate with their gear and their actions.

 

My opinion (take note of that word) is that it would be good if this were not happening at all. The fact that there are a number of people here who have experienced this means that there is the possibility of accidental lens releases occuring. And I feel it would simply be prudent to bring this to the attention of Canon and hopefully they will take this into consideration in future designs.

 

I honestly understand that, if it hasn't hapened to you personally, it would be easy to think that it was just a numpty error. And I'm sure in some cases it is exactly that. In my case it was less numpty and more that I had faith, based on my previous decades of doing this, that the lens mounting would be OK. It was not. The logical conclusion I have drawn is that it is just a little too easy for the lens release to be accidentally activated.

 

Would be nice if, in future, it was a little less easy for this to occur.

 

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎02-13-2013

Re: Accidental Lens Release

Waddizzle wrote:

Schmegg,

If you make the assumption that it is always your fault, an accidental release may never happen to you again.

 

Hehe. Yep. Get your drift here. And that has been exactly my approach.

 

I used to work with electronic technicians troubleshooting control systems.  I would sometimes step in, and help them trace down a nagging problem.  Most of the time, and I mean most of the time, we would find a wire connection that had somehow come apart, and became separated from a terminal strip.

 

 

....

 

Somehow, we would open a panel and find that wire disconnected from the terminal, yet the screw was still in place on the terminal.  Obviously, someone had removed the wire in the course of their troubleshooting in another nearby panel, and had simply forgotten to restore a connection.  It's an easy, though careless, oversight to make.

 

However, some of the technicians would never admit to such an oversight, as minor as it was.  The cost of re-attaching a wire is only a labor cost, not a material cost.  The techs would argue that the wire had come loose on its' own.  Of course, the odds of a screw removing itself, and then replacing itself, are within the realm of possibility, but truly astronomical just the same.

 

OK. So here it seems you are once again subtly implying that it's purely user error and has absolutely nothing at all, in any way, shape or form, to do with the design of the gear in question. And this is where we differ in opinion. 

 

The Canon EF mount has been in use for decades, and it seems to have changed very little over time.  Yet, in recent years their has been an apparent rise in the number of people suffering from lenses spontaneously dropping off of the cameras.  So, what has changed?

 

 I don't think the lens mounts have changed, but I do think they way people use and carry their gear has changed.

 

Yes. That is perhaps true. And it be prudent for manufacturers to be aware of the changing ways in which their gear is being used and continue to cater for that. IMHO.

 

 Most of the complaints on this thread have come from people carrying their camera/lens combos in a sling, or otherwise handling their gear in a hundred different ways, except actually using it to shoot photographs.  

 

Perhaps. But transporting a camera/lens combo is definitely part of the process of photography. And as slings have become much more popular (because they are very convienent) I feel it would be sensible for the camera design to evolve with this development. Once again, just my take on it.

 

In othe words, all of these accidental releases seem to have one thing in common.  They seem to occur immediately after the gear had not been handled for a period of time, just like the wires that had come apart in the terminal cabinets I inspected with technicians.

 

No, not like the wires in the cabinet at all. If the lens had not been correctly mounted in the first place - then, yes. But that's not the case here.

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