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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 63
Registered: ‎11-14-2018

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?

I don't want to say you don't have a problem, just not sure I understand what it is.  It would help with a well lit photo because if that is ok, then the problem may be with sometning at low light, slow shutter, ...  Just saying it would help with analysis.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,967
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?


@AndreaW wrote:

That's lovely, really it is.  But that is not the issue I am having.  I know the importance of lighting and I know I shot in a low lit environment and I know all about "motion blur", "noise", etc. 

 


The blurry items in the snake photo have nothing to do with 'motion blur' or 'noise'. The blurry things in the snake photo are completely Depth of Field related.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-03-2019

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?

This is helpful; thank you.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,087
Registered: ‎02-06-2013

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?

[ Edited ]

@TTMartin wrote:

@AndreaW wrote:

That's lovely, really it is.  But that is not the issue I am having.  I know the importance of lighting and I know I shot in a low lit environment and I know all about "motion blur", "noise", etc. 

 


The blurry items in the snake photo have nothing to do with 'motion blur' or 'noise'. The blurry things in the snake photo are completely Depth of Field related.


From what I can tell from the snake picture, if the focus point was on the snake's head,  the camera front focuses.  The twig in front is a lot clearer and appears to be in focus.  The whole picture is kinda blurry though (not enough contrast).  You might want to check the focus and either send the camera in or do an AFMA adjustment.

 

Having said that, like TTMartin said, it's mostly depth of field...also you must open your mind to others' comments.  You gave very little description, turn off your exif data on your picture.  Your vague description pointed to user's techniques.  We are guessing blind here so don't get mad at us.  Even if our offered guesses indeed do not address your problem, they will help in eliminating possibilities, thus isolate the real cause.  If the problem happened to one of the people here like myself or TTMartin, we would have found it ourselves already or at least can articulate it.  

================================================
Diverhank's photos on Flickr
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,803
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?


@AndreaW wrote:
I think you made a mistake and meant to respond to someone else because your response did not address my issue. My issue has nothing to do with depth of field.

A-

No mistake.  The comment was directed at you.

 

I'm reading your responses to people who are trying to be helpful, but you're rejecting any ideas that indicate that there is the remotest possibility that the problem is due to the photographer's error.

 

In the words of Ansel Adams "The most important part of the camera is the 12 inches behind it."

 

I also tried to explain that if you *really* insist on thinking that the problem must be the camera, then you've got to isolate all other possibilities by taking a test shot using proper testing techniques so that the things like camera movement, photographer movement, subject movement, focus position, shutter speed, etc. can't possibly be the reason for a blurred shot.  But this means using proper test targets and tripods.

 

Your shot doesn't have any EXIF data attached.  But the issue with the musician's hands is caused by motion blur.  There's no mistake here ... that is motion blur.  If you think otherwise, then you're still not familiar with it.  

 

I use motion blur on purpose.  Here's an example:

 

43489027021_34719b533a_b.jpg

 

To freeze motion ... shutter speeds of around 1/250th *might* freeze motion if it isn't moving very fast (and close inspection will usually reveal some blur).  For fast-moving subjects you can need shutter speeds of 1/1000th sec or faster.  THIS shot was taken at just 1/125th (I've taken motion blur at much slower speeds).  The image is tack-sharp.  You can count the whiskers on his face.  You can see the fine detail in his face, hands, and torso.  But his legs and shoes are blurred (they are moving relative to his body) and while the bike frame is tack-sharp, the wheels and spokes are blurred.  The background is blurred due to the effects of motion because the camera lens was swinging from left to right "following" the rider.    The whole effect is done on purpose to create a sense of high-speed motion in a "still" photograph.

 

The musician's hands in your photo are blurred due to the effects of motion (I have many such examples myself).

 

Here's one:

 

IMG_0941.jpg

 

That was shot using my 5D II (I no longer own that camera body) using a Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM lens ... at f/2.  So depth of field is shallow.   It was also shot at ISO 6400 & 1/60th sec.  There's a bit of noise (I've de-noised it a bit via Lightroom but used masking to protect the "edges") but 1/60th isn't fast enough to freeze the motion blur of his hands.  

 

The background here is blurred (notice the drum-set in the lower right), not due to motion blur, camera defects, or lens defects ... but because this was shot at f/2 ... so the blur you see in the background is due to being well-outside the depth-of-field.

 

You can send your camera to Canon if you wish.   They'll send it back with a report that they were unable to find defects and the camera is performing to spec.

 

You may want to pick up a good read such as Bryan Peterson's book "Understanding Exposure".

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,967
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?


@diverhank wrote:


From what I can tell from the snake picture, if the focus point was on the snake's head,  the camera front focuses.  The twig in front is a lot clearer and appears to be in focus.  The whole picture is kinda blurry though (not enough contrast).  You might want to check the focus and either send the camera in or do an AFMA adjustment.


The snake photo was mine. The focus might have been slightly forward of the snakes head. The point I was making was that the leaves were out of focus because they were in front of the range of acceptable focus. I think the posters weren't realizing Deoth of Field impacts things both in front of and behind the plane of focus.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎02-03-2019

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?

I'm glad you posted the picture of the musician because it illustrates a lot of what I am talking about.  Take a look at his left hand -- not the hand with the obvious motion blur.  Do you see the fuzziness on his hand?  I am getting that fuzziness wherever the lighting isn't strong -- even when the musician ISN'T MOVING.  That is the issue, not the motion blur.  Smiley Happy

 

By the way, great color in that photo!  It's a shame his hands came out looking that way as his right hand looks deformed with all of the blur.  It could have really been a nice shot. 

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 63
Registered: ‎11-14-2018

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?

[ Edited ]

I don't know if anyone noticed but the original poster "Sophós" only posted on the first page and then only twice.  This is a very interesting set of posts, but are we really solving the problem.  Are more than a single person having the problem?  Focus and DOF are very interesting and complex subject and obviously somewhat controversial.  BTW nice to see a number of great photos in the posts.

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,803
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?

Two things are happening with the hand on the fret bar.  First, this is a very shallow depth of field.  The DoF is maybe 6" (I'm thinking I'm probably 14-15' away).  You can calculate DoF by using websites like DOFmaster.com (DOF marks are common on old lenses and some modern lenses still have them.  But modern lenses are usually designed to adjust focus faster (less turning of the focus ring ... basically they are not "geared" the same) so even the lenses that have DoF marks usually have them fairly tight together.

 

Anyway, the musician would have been moving his left hand (on the right in this photo) along the neck to switch from chord to chord.  But it's also close enough that it's no longer within the DoF.

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,967
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: 6D gave me really blurry photos?


@AndreaW wrote:

I'm glad you posted the picture of the musician because it illustrates a lot of what I am talking about.  Take a look at his left hand -- not the hand with the obvious motion blur.  Do you see the fuzziness on his hand?  I am getting that fuzziness wherever the lighting isn't strong -- even when the musician ISN'T MOVING.  That is the issue, not the motion blur.  Smiley Happy

 

By the way, great color in that photo!  It's a shame his hands came out looking that way as his right hand looks deformed with all of the blur.  It could have really been a nice shot. 


Andrea it is still a really nice shot. Motion blur isn't necessarily  detractive in a photo as it illustrates movement.

As for the left hand it is a combination of motion blur and beginning to be out of the depth of field.

The capo by the left hand is sharper than the left hand, but, becoming soft being near the front edge of the depth of field.

The left hand is even softer than the capo as the softness of being towards the front edge of the depth of field is exaggerated by slight movement. The impact of those two things are additive. 

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