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New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-05-2014

settings - 300 dpi

How do I change settings on my EOS Rebel T1i so that my photos are 300dpi?  Most that I have taken are coming out 72 dpi

 

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,410
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: settings - 300 dpi

What software are you using to print your files? That's where the ppi is set.
John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic
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VIP
Posts: 12,272
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: settings - 300 dpi

DPI is meaningless in shooting digital images. What is important is the total resolution:

In your case, 4272 x 2848, give or take. Smiley Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-13-2016

Re: settings - 300 dpi

I have a t3i and a t5 I also was wondering how to change n order to shoot at 250-300 dpi

 

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,410
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: settings - 300 dpi

You can't, because as stated above dpi is related to printing, not digital capture. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic
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New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-13-2016

Re: settings - 300 dpi

John thanks for answering my question even though it was a repeat.
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VIP
Posts: 9,234
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: settings - 300 dpi

Canon's Digital Photo Professional has a setting that seems to do what you want.  Use "Batch Process".

 

DPP2_BatchProcess.PNG

 

There is an output setting there, but I have never used it

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Posts: 12,272
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: settings - 300 dpi

The question was, "How do I change settings on my EOS Rebel T1i so that my photos are 300dpi?"

 

What you displayed is "print settings".  There is no 300 dpi in the camera.  Print settings are entirely a different thing.

 

screen.jpg

 

The top red circle deals with the image size.  The bottom blue circle deals with print size. Two different quanties.  DPI can only be set as an output from an editor.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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VIP
Posts: 9,234
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: settings - 300 dpi

As far as the computer software is concerned, generating a JPEG from a CR2 file is a print function. 

 

As a matter of fact, in most computer languages the command to generate the the JPEG is "Print".  As far as the program code is concerned, the only difference between printing to a formatted file, or a formatted hardware device is the "print driver' that is specified to perform the print operation.

 

Maybe I did read the question too quickly, but I also suspect the it is likely OP had a high degree of uncertainty as to how to phrase and ask the question.  Most people do not know how to ask technical questions because they do not speak the language, if you will.

 

Yes, the OP said< "How do I change the settings on my EOS Rebel T1i..."  The question makes the assumption that the solution is a setting that needs to be changed in the camera.  The solution is not a camera setting change.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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VIP
Posts: 12,272
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: settings - 300 dpi

I think you are confused a bit.

The resolution of a RAW file and a JPEG is identical unless you scale it up or down. Processing a RAW file does not affect its resolution. There is no DPI involved. If you save it as TIFF, you can get the same color-depth too. If you save it as JPEG, then the bit-depth reduces to 8-bit per channel.

 

A digital image is composed of pixels. Each pixel represents one colored dot. Millions of pixels make an image. The term resolution is frequently used to describe the number of dots that make up that image.  Photoshop calls it the image size because it uses the term resolution to describe it.  But resolution does not describe the physical size of an image because the size of each pixel is not known, just how many there are.

 

Thet digital cameras produce images of a given number of pixels, but what is the resolution of the camera's image? The real answer is that it depends on the viewing or the printing size.  Software cannot tell what the true DPI of an image is without additional input from you. This is where software like Photoshop confuses folks. Photoshop assumes a DPI until correctly input by the photographer.  To do that you access the resizing box or tab,  and change the DPI. Now with the resample option unselected Photoshop knows that it must not change the image's pixels in any way. It simply sets the DPI. Once the DPI of an image is set, the software knows its intended physical size. Photoshop can figure out the correct DPI by asking the person for a physical size.

Any number of images sizes can be selected and Photoshop figures out what DPI is required. Remember that physical size, image size and image resolution are related, so if any two are known, the third one can be figuered out.

Once an image's DPI is selected, it can be printed easily to a specific size.

 

To further this discussion, where do you find DPI in Photoshop?  If you notice the example I displayed says PPI or Pixels Per Inch.  Not DPI or dots per inch.  Which is undersdtandable as DPI is a PRINTING term and not a digital image term.

 

screen.jpg

 

 

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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