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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,099
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6

I think you mean pterosaur like:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quetzalcoatlus

 

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VIP
Posts: 12,868
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6

Whatever you get the point.  Oneof these things......

Pterodactyl-KA12120.jpg

 

Only without the hangy thingy.  Smiley Happy

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,119
Registered: ‎02-06-2013

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"...about 100 or more yards away..."

 

That is way, way too far away.  It is too far away for even a 600mm lens. Unless you are shooting a pterodactyl. Smiley Happy


I agree with ebiggs1...I don't even bother if it's more than 15 yards away... While true for all photography, it's especially true for BIF : closer is better.  Here is a shot I took a couple of years ago.  This was less than 10 yards taken with a 600mm f/4L + 1.4X on a 7DII (that's 600mm x 1.4 x 1.6 = 1344mm equivalent) and the image did not even fill the full frame.  

 

@Canon 7DII, 600mm f/4L IS USM + 1.4X II @ FL840 (1344); f/5.6; 1/1600; ISO 800

24654534336_b022c78f23_h.jpg

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Diverhank's photos on Flickr
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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 40
Registered: ‎01-22-2017

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6

The long distance shots are for identification only, where binoculars are inadequate – basically using the camera as a telescope, when the birds are much closer the depth of focus is shallow so spot focus important. I use spot metering because it is the bird that needs to be correctly exposed – evaluative on a gull will result in the whites being burnt out, even though the background may be correctly exposed.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,119
Registered: ‎02-06-2013

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6


@mike21 wrote:

The long distance shots are for identification only, where binoculars are inadequate – basically using the camera as a telescope, when the birds are much closer the depth of focus is shallow so spot focus important. I use spot metering because it is the bird that needs to be correctly exposed – evaluative on a gull will result in the whites being burnt out, even though the background may be correctly exposed.


You use whatever modes and methods that work for you.  That's the bottom line.  I think the previous advices (from Waddizzle?) are meant for BIF...when the birds are moving fast, it's very hard to keep a small dot on them for focus and exposure.

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Diverhank's photos on Flickr
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Posts: 10,146
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6


@mike21 wrote:

The long distance shots are for identification only, where binoculars are inadequate – basically using the camera as a telescope, when the birds are much closer the depth of focus is shallow so spot focus important. I use spot metering because it is the bird that needs to be correctly exposed – evaluative on a gull will result in the whites being burnt out, even though the background may be correctly exposed.


Okay.  You are using spot metering and complained about your photos not being properly exposed.  You will not always get everything in a frame ideally exposed, especailly when shooting outdoors.  There is too much dynamic range for the camera during most outdoor shooting conditiona, especially those involving the sky.

 

One word about spot metering on the T6.  If it is like my T5, which strongly suspect is the case, then only the center AF point can be used for spot metering. 

 

Even if you select another AF point, spot metering will only be performed at the center.  You must lock metering using the center as your spot, and then recompose and focus your shot if you wish to use another AF point besides the center.

Again, how automatic exposure is locked changes in One Shot and AI Servo mode when you control it with the shutter button.  You can even change the behavior through custom programming of the rear [AE LOCK] button. 

 

At the distances you are shooting, have you considered using a spotting scope as a lens?

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,409
Registered: ‎03-01-2014

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6

Hi Waddizzle,

"At the distances you are shooting, have you considered using a spotting scope as a lens?"

Not sure if he is but I am, I'd like to hear more on this option.

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Posts: 10,146
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6


@John_ wrote:

Hi Waddizzle,

"At the distances you are shooting, have you considered using a spotting scope as a lens?"

Not sure if he is but I am, I'd like to hear more on this option.


Spotting scopes will have magnification factors ranging from 20-60x.  A 1x magnification is roughly equivalent to a 50mm lens, A spotting scope with a range of 20-60x would be equivalent to a 1000-3000mm zoom lens.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,409
Registered: ‎03-01-2014

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6

And at a fraction of the cost of a 1000-3000mm lens too. Do you know how well a spotting scope will work with the T6i's metering systems when attached together?

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Posts: 10,146
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Using Manual with 750D/Rebel T6


@John_ wrote:

And at a fraction of the cost of a 1000-3000mm lens too. Do you know how well a spotting scope will work with the T6i's metering systems when attached together?


Focusing will, of course, be manual focusing only.  I recommend a tripod, a chair, and a 45 degree viewfinder.

 

As far as metering goes, the lenses have fixed apertures.  They will typically be in the f/11 - f/16 range.  How well the camera will meter a scene will depend on how much available light you have, the sensitivity of the camera’s metering system.

I would not expect any problems shooting in Live View with a spotting scope and a T6i.

 

[BTW]. I just noticed that the OP is probably talking about a T6i not a Rebel T6.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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