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Valued Contributor
Posts: 369
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Rebel T6 Flash


@TightGit wrote:

 

Yes, I realise this is a quality camera and that i should be learning how to use it properly, but at my advanced years my eyesight and mental capacity will not allow me to use it to its full potential.

 

I just want to point and shoot!

 

 


A phone camera or a Canon PowerShot is what you want. 

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎05-11-2017

Re: Rebel T6 Flash

Thanks for your interest.

 

Do either of your suggestions include the following?

 

(1) A viewfinder I can look through, as my eyesight prevents me from seeing a LCD on the back without putting on my reading glasses.

 

(2) Ability to add telephoto lens (at least 200mm) for when I go on African safari.

 

 

VIP
Posts: 8,340
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Rebel T6 Flash



I have bad eyes, too.  I am very short sighted.  It is a major hurdle at times.  I need reading glasses to best see the LCD, but I need my distance glasses that I use for driving in order to see the viewfinder display clearly.  I can still see the LCD well enough with the driving glasses to use the menus, but not for really critical focusing using Live View.

 

1)  There is a viewfinder already built into the camera.  In order to use it, you must turn off the Llive View display.  You have a choice of using the viewfinder, or Live View.  Using the viewfinder is far less of a drain on the battery.

 

2)  Canon offers one of the widest selection of lenses for DSLRs in the industry.

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/lenses-flashes

 

I like to visit the Refurbished Department.  But, it can frequently be "out of stock" on the most popular items for weeks at a time.

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/lenses-flashes/refurbished-lenses

 

Depending upon the type of wildlife, and the size of the animals, and your distance to them, I think a focal length of 200mm could be far too short.  A 200mm focal length falls into the telephoto category, between 100mm and 300mm.

Most wildlife photographers prefer focal lengths in the super telephoto range, which generally 300mm and longer.  In fact, most use focal lengths in the 600-800mm range.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎05-11-2017

Re: Rebel T6 Flash

Thanks, Waddizzle.

 

I'm aware that the 1300D has those features (which is why I bought it) but I was really querying whether the suggested phone cameras or PowerShot have them (I suspect not).

 

In any case, given that my 1300D seems to be faulty, I'm getting a replacement from Amazon, so hoping for better luck with the next one.

VIP
Posts: 8,340
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Rebel T6 Flash


@TightGit wrote:

Thanks, Waddizzle.

 

I'm aware that the 1300D has those features (which is why I bought it) but I was really querying whether the suggested phone cameras or PowerShot have them (I suspect not).

 

In any case, given that my 1300D seems to be faulty, I'm getting a replacement from Amazon, so hoping for better luck with the next one.


The PowerShot Series of cameras fall into a category known as "Point & Shoot" cameras.  There are a few different types of P&S camera lines within the PowerShot Series, too.  The majority of cameras in the highly competitive P&S market do not include a viewfinder, but some of the upscale models do offer an optional viewfinder.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎08-15-2017

Re: Rebel T6 Flash

It's normal for the flash to work in auto during the daylight IF your subject is back lit or is in harsh light. The flash helps to eliminate shadows (raconteurs, long nose ahawdows)!caused by the sun. I use my T6 in manual and rely on my flash during the day if the natural light is challenging to work with.
I hope that this helps.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎07-23-2017

Re: Rebel T6 Flash

The answer to your question is YES. You will find that it is because the camera thinks you are shooting into the sun. If you are shooting people, that leaves their faces dark. So some fill flash in full sun has a purpose.

As you think, that isn't always a good idea. Though generally harmless, you look silly in public and do drain the battery.

By shooting semi-auto you will avoid that but still be able to raise the flash when needed.

You should try it out first. Trying some of the controls can turn your pictures into real treasures.

Good luck.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,009
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Rebel T6 Flash


@Mr_Fusion wrote:
The answer to your question is YES. You will find that it is because the camera thinks you are shooting into the sun. If you are shooting people, that leaves their faces dark. So some fill flash in full sun has a purpose.

As you think, that isn't always a good idea. Though generally harmless, you look silly in public and do drain the battery.

By shooting semi-auto you will avoid that but still be able to raise the flash when needed.

You should try it out first. Trying some of the controls can turn your pictures into real treasures.

Good luck.

If you mind looking silly in public, serious photography probably isn't for you.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎07-23-2017

Re: Rebel T6 Flash


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@Mr_Fusion wrote:


If you mind looking silly in public, serious photography probably isn't for you.


Good point.

New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎09-22-2018

Re: Rebel T6 Flash

I've had this problem as well.  This is an old message so you have probably returned your camera or have found some other solution.  I figured that I would share my input since I think that I have the answer.  The flash sensor relies on light hitting it.  If you have a hat on, it shades the sensor so it thinks that you need the flash.  I've had this happen as well when I've done outdoor shots with a hat on.  Solution is to change the camera to the "no flash" option for these shots (or take off your hat). 

 

Cheers my friend...

 

Traci

 

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