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New Contributor
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-28-2019

Rebel EOS t6

Got this camera as a gift. I have watched several videos and read up on using it. I am currently having 2 issues: 1) my subject is always slightly soft or blurred as is the print on the clothing ahe is wearing. 2) colors are often way off. I have the 18-55mm and 75-300mm lenses that came with it as well as a 50mm lense. I have issues with all of them. I am sure it is user error, but unsure what to do to fix it. Most often I am shooting in overcast weather about 1-2hours before dark. Any help/suggestions are much appreciated.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,342
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Rebel EOS t6

What mode are you using? Green Square? Is there something closer that the camera might be focusing on? Can you post a sample?

New Contributor
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-28-2019

Re: Rebel EOS t6

I am using AV mode and not sure how to post a picture in here.
Moderator
Posts: 1,619
Registered: ‎07-08-2013

Re: Rebel EOS t6

Hi, Tannamers!

It's easy to add a photo to your post.  When composing your message, click the "Insert/Edit Image" icon at the top of the text box. It's near the center and it's a square with a pair of mountain peaks in it. You'll get instructions from there.

That's all there is to it. We look forward to seeing what you share!

New Contributor
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-28-2019

Re: Rebel EOS t6

Hi Danny,

There is no "insert/edit image" button. I have a grey "Add Comment" and "Accept as Solution" and then a black "Kudo" button.
New Contributor
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-28-2019

Re: Rebel EOS t6

Figured it out

 Had to change it out of mobile mode. This was taken yesterday around 5:30-6pm with the 75-300 in AV mode

 f/4.0 and ISO 800. I will be honest and really have no idea what I am doing with this camera and just keep trying rhungs I get off line. I need her face and the image on her clothing to be sharper and I need good colors.

20190328113415_IMG_5530.JPG

VIP
Posts: 8,177
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Rebel EOS t6

Without looking at your EXIF data, I think your photo is fine.  But, .......

 

The kit lenses are not good examples of quality lenses.  They are designed to teach you how to use the camera and interchangeable lenses.  But, with practice and insight, you can capture quality photos with the kit lenses.  With better lenses, you can capture very high quality photos.

 

I think your sample photo is actually pretty good.  Digital images have resolution limits.  You can zoom in on a photo so far that it appears to be fuzzy, out of focus, and pixelated.  I think you posted is a good candidate of this possibility.  But, there are other factors that can contribute to misconceptions about the quality of a photo.

 

You have expressed a lack of confidence in your knowledge of how to use the camera.  I have recently created a thread that contains links to a few tutorial playlists on the Canon YouTube channel.

https://community.usa.canon.com/t5/General-Camera-Discussion/Canon-YouTube-Video-Series/m-p/269237#M...

 

Take a look at the series of videos at the first link, “EOS 101.”  This series introduces you to the two most basic concepts in photography the “ Exposure Triangle “ and “ Depth Of Field “.  Most people benefit from watching them more than once.  There is a lot of material and concepts to digest.

 

One of the most important concepts is how you save your images in the camera.  You can save them as RAW or JPG.  Digital cameras are designed to emulate the behavior of film cameras.  Film cameras came in two basic flavors.  You had cameras that film cartridges, which could spit out a print [JPG].  Or, you would have a roll of film that would needed to be developed in a laboratory [RAW].

 

———————

 

Back to your posted photo.  I think it is as almost as good as it gets with the 18-55mm kit lens.  Any improvements in image quality would have to come from technique.  Techniques such as using a high shutter speed, low ISO, thoughtful aperture setting, and using a stable platform like a tripod.

As for the colors in the image, one of the EOS 101 videos explains WB, White Balance.  The human brain is very good at fooling the eye into showing you what colors should look like, instead of what they actually look like.  White Balance compensates for the color spectrum of your light source when you take a photograph.

 

For example, if someone is wearing a white shirt in a dark room, and you shine a green light on them, your brain will show you a white shirt and a green light.  Your camera will simply see a green shirt.  Your camera has different WB settings, including an automatic setting.  But, even the automatic setting can be slightly off the mark, or even completely fooled by multiple light sources.

 

This is where saving your photos as RAW or JPG comes into play.  When you shoot as JPG files, you wil get an instant photo image, which cannot be edited very well.  However, when you shoot as RAW, you have file that can be edited more easily than a JPG, most especially when it comes to setting up proper WB levels.  

 

Just like a guy in film dark room, you need to convert the digital negative, a RAW file, into a digital print, a JPG file.  You can use Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software to perform this task.  You can use Canon DPP software to adjust the WB of your captured images however you like.  You can also use a “grey card’ to capture a sample image so that you can calibrate the WB settings to the available light when you took the photos.

If this sounds like a LOT, then that is because it is a lot.  Your camera is an instrument that requires practice to use well.  My advice is to keep shooting, keep practicing exposure settings.  Learn how to shoot RAW images and process them into JPG images.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 11,216
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Rebel EOS t6

[ Edited ]

First, she is a doll. Smiley Happy

 

Second, this is pretty wrong! "This was taken yesterday around 5:30-6pm with the 75-300 in AV mode  f/4.0 and ISO 800."

 

Why are you using a tele zoom for a normal snapshot?  Put the 18-55mm back on and get closer to her. Don't use Av mode. As a matter of fact, reset your camera right now.  Menu, Tools, clear all settings. This will put you back to square one. Next put the mode dial to "P" mode.  Set the ISO to 200. Set WB to daylight or cloudy if it is so. I suggest using only the center focus point and focus on her face.

 

The 75-300mm is not known as a real sharp lens so just switching to the 18-55mm is going to help.

 

The other modes like Av or Tv, etc, are for specific requirements,  This shot is not one of those.  Even the full auto (green square) mode would do this shot.

 

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
Highlighted
VIP
Posts: 11,216
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Rebel EOS t6

"This is where saving your photos as RAW or JPG comes into play."

 

Normally I am all in for shooting Raw file format, however, in your case it is a walk before you run thing.  Use the large jpg format for now.  No sense adding another level of difficulty right off. A jpg is a finished photo while a Raw requires you to convert it and edit it in post.

Also, while, some reading and learning is a good thing, overload is not.  Too, much will only confuse you and make it harder to concentrate on getting a good picture. That is why we never start with advanced settings for beginners.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
Valued Contributor
Posts: 469
Registered: ‎02-13-2016

Re: Rebel EOS t6

[ Edited ]

Focus and sharpness actually appear pretty good considering the lighting and the lens used. But your EXIF info shows a -2/3 exposure compensation setting which at least partly explains the lack of contrast and highlight details. If shot in RAW a much greater amount of detail could be brought out in this shot. When shooting in JPEG your metering and W/B have to be much closer to spot-on.

 

If you were shooting this handheld, at 1/320 of a second you might be seeing a touch of camera movement blur. This shot might have been good time to use the 50mm/f1.8 lens. The larger aperture would have let you increase shutter speed a bit and the narrower depth of field would have allowed you to sharply focus on your subject while softly blurring out the background.

 

Try setting exposure compensation back to "0" or maybe slightly overexposed. Keep shooting JPEGs till you get comfortable with the camera and your results. Try both Auto and Manually adjusting W/B and find what works best for you. And keep rereading Waddizzle's post above till it starts making sense to you.

 

Then get ready to start shooting in RAW.

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