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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-11-2019

Question about ISO

New to DSLR's. Am I missing something or should I see a fairly significant difference in a photo using ISO 200 and 12800? -- because I don't? I've never been able to use ISO to give me more light with this camera. I just took 2 pictures both at F/8 and with the ISO set at the numbers already mentioned. They look almost identical? I would post the pictures but I'm not sure how to upload here. Thanks so much.

Moderator
Posts: 1,616
Registered: ‎07-08-2013

Re: Question about ISO

Hi, tattyne!

Inserting photos is easy! When composing your message, click the "Insert/Edit Image" icon at the top of the text box. It's near the center and it's a square with a pair of mountain peaks in it. You'll get instructions from there.

We hope this helps!

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,340
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Question about ISO

What camera?

Post by clicking the little mountain icon. You might need to resize the image a little smaller.

 

An ISO of 12800 should be very grainy. There should also be a 4 stop difference in shutter speed. If the ISO200 -f/8 image was 1/20 of a second, the ISO 12800 -f8 image should at 1/1280 of a second.

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-11-2019

Re: Question about ISO

Thanks so much!
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-11-2019

Re: Question about ISO

Here are the two photos. The first is ISO 200 the second is ISO 12800. I understand the higher the ISO the more grain/noise is introduced into the photo but I also thought that I would increase ISO when I needed more light. These photos probably arent the best example because I really didn't need the light sensitivity (does a too high ISO not "over expose" a picture though?) If I go into a room that definitely needs more light, I increase my ISO -- even by lots like in this example but it doesn't seem to change anything. I don't get it?

iso200.jpgISO12800.jpg

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,340
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Question about ISO

[ Edited ]

If you zoom in you can see the difference:

 

ISO 200:

 

iso200.jpg

 

 

ISO 12800:

iso12800.jpg

Note the extra grain and lack of detail, probably due to the noise reduction. It is still pretty good for an ISO12800 image, though! Very usable. This is way you use a DSLR, the large sensor gives good noise performance.

 

 

Valued Contributor
Posts: 365
Registered: ‎10-21-2016

Re: Question about ISO

If you are using the camera in green square(auto), P,AV,TV or any of the scene modes then changing to a higher ISO will not cause over exposure because the camera will adjust either shutter speed or aperture to compensate and give you the correct exposure, if however you are in manual (M) mode then you will have to change these yourself to get the exposure correct.

VIP
Posts: 11,199
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Question about ISO

" I increase my ISO -- even by lots... but it doesn't seem to change anything."

 

Being new I think you might be falling for the huge increase in numbers and not the lesser increase in f-stops.

 

The rule is a doubling of numbers.  I.E., ISO 800 to ISO 1600, seems like you added a lot of numbers, however, you just increased the f-stop by one. So, 800 to 1600 is one to 3200 is two and 6400 is three. That makes ISO 12800 four stops faster than ISO 800 but the number spread is huge at 12,000!

Most current DSLRs can shoot cleanly at ISO 6400 and even 12,800.  Something that a few years ago would have not been possible.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-11-2019

Re: Question about ISO

" I increase my ISO -- even by lots... but it doesn't seem to change anything."

 

Being new I think you might be falling for the huge increase in numbers and not the lesser increase in f-stops.

 

The rule is a doubling of numbers.  I.E., ISO 800 to ISO 1600, seems like you added a lot of numbers, however, you just increased the f-stop by one. So, 800 to 1600 is one to 3200 is two and 6400 is three. That makes ISO 12800 four stops faster than ISO 800 but the number spread is huge at 12,000!

Most current DSLRs can shoot cleanly at ISO 6400 and even 12,800.  Something that a few years ago would have not been possible.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, along with less and less other stuff.
 
Thank-you, that makes a lot of sense, perhaps I'm expecting too much from a higher ISO? I guess the bottom line is, if I don't have enough light (the picture looks dark in the display) and I already have the aperture wide open (I currently only have the canon kit lens) I guess I need auxilliary lighting? I take real estate interior photos.
VIP
Posts: 11,199
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Question about ISO

Consider a tripod
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV, even less and less other stuff.
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