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Valued Contributor
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

No mirror lockup on the T6?

As I mentioned in another post, I'll be going out to the old graveyard this weekend and hope to spend some time in low light conditions taking some photos. I had assumed I would require the use of a tripod and long(er) exposures, as I plan to shoot after sundown and into the evening, if I can. 

 

I have read that shutter shake and image stabilization can cause some blur even on a tripod. I'll shut off IS, but it seems the mirror will still be a problem as the T6 doesn't seem to have a mirror lockup feature that I can find.

 

So what do you choose -- Live View or a 2-second timer? Would either or both emulate mirror lockup? 

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,861
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

You could shoot in live view, which takes the mirror out of play (locks it up and shoots like video).  You can also activate the camera with a remote trigger or simply use a 3 second delay to prevent your hand pressing the button from shaking the camera. 

 

 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?
VIP
Posts: 8,575
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

[ Edited ]

@John_SD wrote:

As I mentioned in another post, I'll be going out to the old graveyard this weekend and hope to spend some time in low light conditions taking some photos. I had assumed I would require the use of a tripod and long(er) exposures, as I plan to shoot after sundown and into the evening, if I can. 

 

I have read that shutter shake and image stabilization can cause some blur even on a tripod. I'll shut off IS, but it seems the mirror will still be a problem as the T6 doesn't seem to have a mirror lockup feature that I can find.

 

So what do you choose -- Live View or a 2-second timer? Would either or both emulate mirror lockup? 

 

 


I would not worry about lack of mirror lockup with a T6.  There are other factors that can have an equal or greater impact, such as the robustness of your tripod/head combination.  Camera shake from mirror vibrations are minuscule compared to camera shake from hand holding the camera, or even camera shake from using a low quality tripod.  A plastic tripod can vibrate in breeze like a tuning fork.  A cheap tripod, and/or cheap head, can amplify vibrations from the mirror, whereas a robust tripod will not be affected at all.  Fully extending the center column on a tripod destabilizes it, which can have a greater negative impact, or even amplify vibrations from your hand or the mirror.

 

The quality and focal length of your lens, as well as the distance to your subject, can contribute to how much camera shake from the mirror can degrade your photos.  Not unless you are shooting at telephoto focal lengths, I wouldn't worry about camera shake from the mirror too much.  Not unless you are shooting at close to macro distances, I wouldn't worry about mirror vibrations too much.  Not unless you are shooting at comparatively short shutter speeds, significantly less than 1/[focal length], I wouldn't worry about mirror vibrations too much.

 

If you are using a tripod for long exposures, then I would encourage using the 2-second timer, or even the 10-second timer.  If you are using a tripod, then it is beneficial to turn off Image Stabilization.  Some combinations of camera body and lens claim to be able to determine when the camera is tripod mounted.  Unfortunately, the entry level T6 is not one of those camera bodies.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 11,622
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

"Would either or both emulate mirror lockup?"

 

This is something you needn't worry about.  It will have zero effect on your photos.

 

 

"So what do you choose -- Live View or a 2-second timer?"

 

You don't need Liveview either. Use the exposure meter in the T6 and shoot in Av mode.  Select your aperture before hand for the look you desire.  Have a good tripod and use the delay timer as the shutter release.

 

What you are shooting is a simple task.  Don't try to make it a difficult one.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Valued Contributor
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

Thanks for the tips, guys. I had planned on using Av anyway, but based on the responses I'll definitely be going with the 2-second timer as well.

 

I plan to take a series of shots starting at sundown. I'll stay about an hour. I plan to vary the ISO and see what the results are. As I am a beginner, I don't yet have a feel for what to expect from adjusting the ISO to varying light conditions, but I look forward to the experience. I don't want to go too high with the ISO and end up with a lot of noise, but since it will be getting dark, I expect to have to raise it. I don't want to go over 800 if I can avoid it. 

 

As for a tripod, I've got the Manfrotto 290 Light Tripod with the ball head. Why did I choose that one? Price, weight and material. It was $79.99 at the big box member store I frequent, it is LIGHT (about 3 1/2 lbs.) as I will be carrying it around all day in the desert in due course, has a load capacity of about 8.8 lbs, and is made of aluminum, not plastic. Not a high-end tripod by any means, but having twiddled around with it a little bit, I believe it will be perfectly adequate for my purposes for the next few years at least. Thanks again for the tips. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,861
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

Please don't shoot ISO 800 on a Rebel if you are shooting static subjects and you have the benefit of a long exposure on a tripod to help you.  I would shoot at ISO 100, or possibly ISO 200 and I'd simply let the long exposure give me all the light I need.  

 

That's the beauty of long exposures. It is a luxury you can't always use because sometimes your subjects are alive and moving and sometimes you don't have a tripod handy, but you have a still life subject and time to use a pod. Take advantage of it and stay out of the higher ISO's. 

 

If your tripod has a little hook on the underside between the legs, hang your camera bag or something heavy on the hook to stabilize your setup. 

 

If you are not not sure how stable your untested pod is, you might cover yourself and grab a few shots with your camera resting flat and solidly on some more solid object if possible. A flat gravestone, a bench, a flat rock, etc..., just in case it turns out the pod is not up to it, you have not wasted the trip. 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,861
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

[ Edited ]

Looking again your load rating of 8 pounds is definitely on the low end of the specs range (as is the price).  If there is wind there could be issues.  I'd be wary until I was more familiar with its limits.

 

Another way to maximize stability is to not extend it to full height, and to not use the little crank-up center stalk at all. The shorter you have the legs the more stable it is, and the less any vibration can be amplified.  You will have to stoop over or kneel to shoot but it is worth the effort if it turns out there is any doubt your pod is holding solidly. 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?
VIP
Posts: 11,622
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

"Your load rating of 8 pounds is definitely on the low end ..."

 

Any tripod is better than no tripod.  The 290 isn't a bad one but it is a little on the weak side of things.  Probably OK with the Rebel and kit lens. 

 

Tip:  Shoot at all the ISO's you have.  That is how you learn.  Not by reading what someone else did or does.

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
VIP
Posts: 8,575
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: No mirror lockup on the T6?

[ Edited ]

If that is the tripod that I have in mind, then that is a pretty good tripod, and a good match for a Rebel T6.  Try to avoid fully raising the center column.  Bringing something to sit on would be a good idea, since you plan to be out there for an hour.

 

If you are not familiar with the "Exposure Triangle", then I suggest that you do a web search on the subject.  There countless articles and videos out there.  Become familiar with reading the exposure meter in the viewfinder, and how to read Shutter Speed, Aperture Value, and ISO Setting.

 

One rule of thumb to capturing sharp photos is to grab as much light as you can [low aperture value], as fast as you can [fast shutter speeds], with as little effort as possible [low ISO value].  

 

Changing your aperture value can change how much of the photo foreground and background are in focus.  Changing your shutter speed changes how long light is allowed to enter the camera, which controls under/over exposure on your shots.  Changing the ISO changes how much the signal on the image sensor is amplified.  The more a signal is amplified, the more noise and static that can creep into your shots.  The lower the ISO value, then the less amplification is applied to the signal. 

 

Shooting at ISO 100 will produce very clean shots.  As you raise the ISO, more and more noise can be introduced to your photos.  How much noise is unacceptable is pretty subjective, and can vary depending upon what you are photographing.  You should be able to capture acceptable shots to at least ISO 800.

 

As you vary your ISO, the camera will adjust the shutter speed for correct exposure.  You will get the slowest shutter speeds at ISO 100, but you will also get your cleanest and sharpest photos at the ISO value.  Good Luck.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
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