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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎01-01-2017
Accepted Solution

Moon pics

I have a t6i, 75-300 'll zoom, and tripod. My moon pics show no detail of the moon, just a very sharp, crisp white ball. Very new to all this, any suggestions. Thanks, 😎
Super Contributor
Posts: 145
Registered: ‎12-03-2016

Re: Moon pics

If you're not setting exposure manually, try spot metering rather than evaluative.  Also, note that while you can get attractive shots of a full moon, the greatest detail will be visible during a partial phase when shadows along the terminator highlight crater detail.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,413
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Moon pics

Remember, the moon is an object lit by bright sunlight. Use the looney11 rule and use a manual exposure:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Looney_11_rule

Occasional Contributor
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎01-01-2017

Re: Moon pics

Thanks !!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,853
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Moon pics

If any automatic exposure is used (especially with evaluative metering) the camera notices the blackness of the nigtht sky, assumes the sky is underexposed, and it tends to over-expose the moon.  This blows out any details on the surface.

 

The exposure guideline suggests that at f/11 (and only at f/11 for this guideline to work) that the shutter speed is simply the inverse of the ISO setting.  E.g. at ISO 100 then the shutter speed should be 1/100th sec; at ISO 200 then the shutter speed should be 1/200th, etc.

 

Here's an example

 

IMG_2918.jpg

 

You can see a larger version on my Flickr page:  https://flic.kr/p/TDsy5A

 

You don't have to use f/11... you can use f/8 or f/5.6, or any f-stop... as long as you know how to trade "stops" of aperture for stops of ISO or shutter speed.  e.g. if you used f/8 (which is one stop brighter then f/11) then you'd need to either reduce the ISO by a stop, or reduce the shutter speed by a stop to balance the exposure.

 

To control this, you'll need to use manual exposure - don't even meter.  Just dial in the exposure and shoot.

 

 

Moon exposures like the one above are typically presented after the photographer has post-processed them.  The image above has had a white balance adjustment as well as some exposure & contrast adjustment, and I also typically apply a bit of sharpening to help the craters pop.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
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Posts: 13,574
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Moon pics

[ Edited ]

What most folks fail to realize is, it is always daylight on the Moon.  It isn't night time up there! Smiley Happy

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
VIP
Posts: 11,122
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Moon pics


@ebiggs1 wrote:

What most folks fail to realize is, it is always daylight on the Moon.  It isn't night time up there! Smiley Happy


You read my mind.  So, what WB settings should be used?  

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,853
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Moon pics


@ebiggs1 wrote:

What most folks fail to realize is, it is always daylight on the Moon.  It isn't night time up there! Smiley Happy


That's exactly right.  But there is one caveat.

 

For a typical daylight (mid-day sun on a clear day) we can use the "Sunny 16" rule:  if using f/16, just set the shutter speed to the inverse of your ISO (or ASA back in the film days) - the rule was great to know when you did photography back when cameras didn't have built-in light meters.

 

But the moon is actually a rather poor reflector of light.  It's true tonality is roughly the shade of the sidewall of an old black tire... or an old asphalt road (not freshly paved road when it looks darker).   A properly exposed image of the moon would actually look a bit dim because of this rather poor reflectivity.  

 

The "Looney 11" suggests brightening it up by shooting 1 stop brigher than the "Sunny 16" rule (hence "Looney 11" rule).

 

The moon is technically in "sunlight" and the Sun is pumping out a VERY consistent amount of light.  The light meter reading you could get 1000 years ago is the same meter reading you'd get today and it will be the same in another 1000 years.  So there's no need to "meter" the moon as long as you know the rule.  Just dial in the exposure and take the shot.

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,853
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Moon pics


@Waddizzle wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

What most folks fail to realize is, it is always daylight on the Moon.  It isn't night time up there! Smiley Happy


You read my mind.  So, what WB settings should be used?  


I shoot everything in RAW.  But if using JPEG, just set it to Daylight (Sun).

 

My astrophotography camera (Canon EOS 60Da) is about 4-5x more sensitive to "reds" than a typical camera, so all the images come out looking very warm and I always have to adjust the white balance in post processing.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,558
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Moon pics


@ebiggs1 wrote:

What most folks fail to realize is, it is always daylight on the Moon.  It isn't night time up there! Smiley Happy


Well, er, you could just as easily say that about the Earth. Yes, it's always daylight somewhere on the Moon, but not necessarily where you're looking. Remember: the "dark side of the Moon" is just a figure of speech.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
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