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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎06-08-2021

Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

Hello Canon friends.

 

 I recently bought a new Canon T8i following the advice from some friends on this forum.  I will be traveling to Maine in a few days and I'm hoping to get the best possible pictures from my new Canon T8i camera as possible. 

 

I went from a Canon Rebel T-3 to this camera.  It's definately taking a little getting use too.  I see it has so many more creative options to chose from so it's a little over whelming. I'm just looking for some basic beautiful fall landscape pictures.

 

Does anyone have any basic recommendations for settings to take some crisp fall landscape pictures without it being more that I can handle as a new-be with this camera?

 

Thank you so much for any recommendations.

VIP
Posts: 8,439
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

While the T8i may have more built-in special modes it still has the same basic modes as your T3. 

I would not recommend exploring the new features on a special trip/event. 

Use P or green square Auto or whatever other settings you successfully used on the T3. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic
Reputable Contributor
Posts: 957
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

If you are looking for general guidance try this link:

How to Take Landscape Photographs with a Canon EOS Rebel

 

This link will give you sample images to look at.  The point here is to REALLY look at how the image was constructed and obeserve the settings used by the photographers.

Canon EOS Rebel T8i (850D) sample gallery: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 

Try this video on landscape photography:

The BEST SETTINGS for Landscape Photography - YouTube

 

If you are really hoping to get the most out of your new camera, you need to invest some time in getting the skill to use the tool fully.  So look on-line for tutorials.   I recommend going to your local libary website and searching the catalogue for an item called LinkedIn Learning - if available, this will give you free access via the library to a huge range of tutorials on photography by highly skilled photographers and talented educators.  They cover everything else from the very basics of exposure to advanced post-production techniques.

 

Otherwise Youtube tutorials, books from the library - SPEND TIME LOOKING AT THE IMAGES OF GOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS and understanding how their settings created their results.

 

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me
Forum Elite
Posts: 14,339
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

"I would not recommend exploring the new features on a special trip/event. 
Use P or green square Auto or whatever other settings you successfully used on the T3."

 

John is correct here. The best advice is keep a simple shot,... simple. Smiley Happy

 

Don't over think it. P mode will most likely capture most of what you want. I personally would avoid any of the so-called creative modes. Do shoot Raw. <--- Always !  Do use a lower ISO number like 200 for most daylight shots. Be prepared to change it though. Smaller aperture number perhaps f8. Be prepared to change it too.

 

It is nice to read stuff and watch tutorials and such but experience is the best teacher. Also, don't over think it. And, remember no photographer gets a prize winner on every shot.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,935
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 957
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

[ Edited ]

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"I would not recommend exploring the new features on a special trip/event. 
Use P or green square Auto or whatever other settings you successfully used on the T3."

 

John is correct here. The best advice is keep a simple shot,... simple. Smiley Happy

 

Don't over think it. P mode will most likely capture most of what you want. I personally would avoid any of the so-called creative modes. Do shoot Raw. <--- Always !  Do use a lower ISO number like 200 for most daylight shots. Be prepared to change it though. Smaller aperture number perhaps f8. Be prepared to change it too.

 

It is nice to read stuff and watch tutorials and such but experience is the best teacher. Also, don't over think it. And, remember no photographer gets a prize winner on every shot.


The quote and comments about THIS trip I support.  My advice is for when you have the opportunity to spend time and take a structured approach to learning to get the most from your new investment.  Photography is a 'slow burn', so if you want to get out there and take pictures right now, then trust the camera's auto features.   You may find that they don't work on all occasions, but they should give you acceptable shots for the majority of your trip. 

 

That said, when you get back, if you want to take more control, then use the many links suggested as a starting point to expand your skill.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,935
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

Or, move to where Trevor is and you have another 6 months to get ready. 8^)

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 957
Registered: ‎10-18-2016

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

[ Edited ]

@kvbarkley wrote:

Or, move to where Trevor is and you have another 6 months to get ready. 8^)




Absolutely, apply NOW - it will take at least that long to be allowed in.  We have about 5,000 Managed Isolation Facility spaces for those who want to enter the country, and 25,000 NZ'ers alone, who want access to come home.  So heaven knows how many foreign nationals want in!

 

Spring down here has been a long time coming, so I am going to enjoy it!

 

Stay safe and well, wherever you are!

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me
Forum Elite
Posts: 14,339
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

"Photography is a 'slow burn',..."

 

Good fact. Smiley Happy

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 80
Registered: ‎09-18-2020

Re: Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

[ Edited ]

@jburch921 wrote:

Hello Canon friends.

 

 I recently bought a new Canon T8i following the advice from some friends on this forum.  I will be traveling to Maine in a few days and I'm hoping to get the best possible pictures from my new Canon T8i camera as possible. 

 

I went from a Canon Rebel T-3 to this camera.  It's definately taking a little getting use too.  I see it has so many more creative options to chose from so it's a little over whelming. I'm just looking for some basic beautiful fall landscape pictures.

 

Does anyone have any basic recommendations for settings to take some crisp fall landscape pictures without it being more that I can handle as a new-be with this camera?

 

Thank you so much for any recommendations.


jburch921,

 

I got an T8i recently too.

I've been doing a lot of shooting in Aperture Priority mode with my aperture set at 7.1.and Auto ISO..

If you do that, you can know ahead of time that the camera will automatically set a shutter speed at close to 2X your focal length.

If you are shooting a stationary object, that should be more than adequate to avoid any motion blur.

If you are shooting a moving object, you can change over to Shutter Priority mode and try to pick a shutter speed that will either freeze the motion, or deliberately introduce subject blur..

 

When I started out, I was using Auto White Balance, but thought that my pictures were coming out ;loking kind of washed out.

When I started using either Daylight White Balance, or Cloudy White Balance, they are coming out better, I think.

 

Here's a picture I took just the other day. I was Aperture Priority mode. My lens was at 186mm and the camera set a shutter speed of 1/400. I was so startled, that I completely forgot to focus. I thought he was going to land on my head

Smiley Happy

 

I'm not dead yet.jpg

 

Steve Thomas

 

 

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