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mode dial eos 6d fell off.

Granolakid
Occasional Contributor

I had to purchase a new one.  What is the best glue to use to glue it back on so chances are less that it won't fall off again?  

 

Thanks.

 

barb

9 REPLIES 9

RobertTheFat
Honored Contributor

The consensus from earlier discussions seems to be that it falls off because Canon glued it on the cheap, with only two tiny drops of Superglue. Superglue or its equivalent should presumably be up to the job if you use enough of it (but not, of course, enough to accidentally glue your finger to the dial).

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Granolakid
Occasional Contributor

Thanks.  I will go out and purchase a tube. I had thought of using Gorilla Glue, but if SuperGlue has a track record, I will go with it. I know it's late but did anyone ever complain to Canon about this.  When I spoke to the tech department, they couldn't even telll me how to put it back on.  I've owned Canon equipment forever and this was terribly disappointing because I had to pay $26.00 for a poorly designed feature.

 

The one other thing that bothers me is that the lens cases are not cases at all and I probably should look into purchasing decent cases.  If you have any suggestions, please let me know.  Things seem to be spiraling down.

 

Happy New Year to you and thanks for your quick reply.

 

barb

cicopo
Esteemed Contributor

Personally I'd be more inclined to use a tiny amount of expoxy even though I have lots of CA (AKA Super Glue) on hand. Fewer risks & a better long term track record. If a drop of CA gets into the wrong place bad things will happen. If I were going to use it I'd be very sparing & invert the camera so that any excess runs away from the body.

 

Re lens pouches I've used LowePro for a very long time & think they are a good value for the protection they offer. Last year I decided to order a full set of new ones for all the lenses I have & used their "bag finder" software & stupidly followed their recommendations. Several pouches were too big or 2 small relative to the lenses the software said fit, & that's with or without the hoods. I wrote them & they said they would make corrections but I haven't verified that they did SO I recommend measuring for yourself & picking by size.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

RobertTheFat
Honored Contributor

@cicopo wrote:

Personally I'd be more inclined to use a tiny amount of expoxy even though I have lots of CA (AKA Super Glue) on hand. Fewer risks & a better long term track record. If a drop of CA gets into the wrong place bad things will happen. If I were going to use it I'd be very sparing & invert the camera so that any excess runs away from the body.

 

Epoxy is good when you need a bit of bulk to hold things together. (I used it to very good advantage many years ago to repair a broken cable release,) But my understanding of the 6D problem is that what falls off is the thin metal plate with the markings on it. Cyanoacrylate glue should be fine for that, since you don't really want to add bulk. But if it runs at all after you push the piece back on, you've used too much. If it's the whole knob that falls off, then yes, you might need to use epoxy (though I think I'd be inclined not to attempt that repair myself).

 

Re lens pouches I've used LowePro for a very long time & think they are a good value for the protection they offer. Last year I decided to order a full set of new ones for all the lenses I have & used their "bag finder" software & stupidly followed their recommendations. Several pouches were too big or 2 small relative to the lenses the software said fit, & that's with or without the hoods. I wrote them & they said they would make corrections but I haven't verified that they did SO I recommend measuring for yourself & picking by size.

 

B&H sells "Pearstone" cases (a house brand of theirs, I guess) that are fairly beefy and have worked well for me. But I've also come to like the Canon pouches for some applications. You wouldn't want to hang one on your belt, but they don't take up much space (or add much weight) in a bag.

 

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

cicopo
Esteemed Contributor

I use both plus a lot of other adhesives regularly. If it's just the dial on top of the actual knob I'd be even more inclined to use epoxy because it's non porous & because you can clean up any excess that squeezes out when pressing the dial down into the epoxy. A little bit of rubbing alcohol on a paper towel can clean it up but cleaning up excess CA is tough. Either way both will glue it together but use it sparingly.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

Granolakid
Occasional Contributor

Hello Robert,

 

Thanks so mich for helping me.  I appreciate your complete and thoughtful answers.  It is the metal piece that goes on the dial.  And I know I have to be very careful not to get any on the button in the middle that turns the dial.   I will get epoxy instead.

 

Kind regards,

 

barb

Granolakid
Occasional Contributor

Oh well the epoxy was meant for Cicopo.  Sorry for the mix up.

 

I see you also have a sense of humor.

 

barb

Granolakid
Occasional Contributor

Thank you so much for your reply.  It is the metal piece that fell off.  But no matter what I use, I have to be careful not to get any on the button in the center.  

 

Kind regards,

barb

cicopo
Esteemed Contributor

Use a toothpick to apply a very small amount of Vasolene all around the button. That will protect it from the epoxy. 

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."